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Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover Animation

This 11-minute animation depicts key events of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, which will launch in late 2011 and land a rover, Curiosity, on Mars in...
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Overheard@GDC 2014: Working with NASA on VR is cool | Joystiq

Overheard@GDC 2014: Working with NASA on VR is cool | Joystiq | Science | Scoop.it
Speaking during the Morpheus reveal event, Marks stated that Sony has been working with NASA to create a VR simulation of the surface of Mars, incorporating actual data from Mars rovers. Sure, it's a great way to showcase ...
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Rescooped by Joshua Meyer from Telecom internet and space news
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NASA’s 3D Printer Launch into Space Expected in 2014 | The Money Times

NASA’s 3D Printer Launch into Space Expected in 2014 | The Money Times | Science | Scoop.it
NASA’s 3D printer is receiving finishing touches and is almost ready to be shuttled out to the space.

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Rescooped by Joshua Meyer from Scientificus
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NASA - NASA's Kepler Discovers Multiple Planets Orbiting a Pair of Stars

NASA - NASA's Kepler Discovers Multiple Planets Orbiting a Pair of Stars | Science | Scoop.it

Coming less than a year after the announcement of the first circumbinary planet, Kepler-16b, NASA's Kepler mission has discovered multiple transiting planets orbiting two suns for the first time. This system, known as a circumbinary planetary system, is 4,900 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus.

 

This discovery proves that more than one planet can form and persist in the stressful realm of a binary star and demonstrates the diversity of planetary systems in our galaxy.

 

Astronomers detected two planets in the Kepler-47 system, a pair of orbiting stars that eclipse each other every 7.5 days from our vantage point on Earth.

 

One star is similar to the sun in size, but only 84 percent as bright. The second star is diminutive, measuring only one-third the size of the sun and less than 1 percent as bright.

 

"In contrast to a single planet orbiting a single star, the planet in a circumbinary system must transit a 'moving target.'

 

As a consequence, time intervals between the transits and their durations can vary substantially, sometimes short, other times long," said Jerome Orosz, associate professor of astronomy at San Diego State University and lead author of the paper. "The intervals were the telltale sign these planets are in circumbinary orbits." ...


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