Science
9 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Joanna from Science News
Scoop.it!

Babies learn to babble like birds learn to sing

Babies learn to babble like birds learn to sing | Science | Scoop.it
Babies learn to babble before they learn to talk, at first simply repeating individual syllables (as in ba-ba-ba), and later stringing various syllables together (as in ba-da-goo). Songbirds exhibit similar patterns during song-learning, and the capacity for this sort of syllable sequencing is widely believed to be innate and to emerge full-blown — a theory that is challenged by a paper published on Nature's website today1.A study of three species — zebra finches, Bengalese finches and humans — reports that none of the trio has it that easy. Their young all have to learn how to string syllables together slowly, pair by pair.“We discovered a previously unsuspected stage in human vocal development,” says first author Dina Lipkind, a psychologist now at Hunter College in New York.More: http://www.nature.com/news/babies-learn-to-babble-like-birds-learn-to-sing-1.13090
Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
Sakis Koukouvis's curator insight, June 2, 2013 11:24 AM

Research challenges theory of innate vocal abilities.

Broken Arrow Veterinarian Clinic's comment, June 28, 2013 10:49 PM
how cute! :)
Rescooped by Joanna from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Cancer-resistant blind mole rat gets its genome sequenced

Cancer-resistant blind mole rat gets its genome sequenced | Science | Scoop.it
Scientists have sequenced the genome of the blind mole rat, a mammal that digs with its teeth, has skin over its eyes and lives for more than 20 years. It is also resistant to cancer, like its distant cousin the naked mole rat.Among the results were what the researchers believe are the genetic signatures of the mole rat's complete loss of vision and its impressive tolerance of low oxygen (or "hypoxia"). They also discovered how its special cancer-fighting mechanism might have evolved.One of the study's lead authors, Prof Eviatar Nevo from the University of Haifa in Israel, has studied blind mole rats for more than 50 years. In all of that time, a spontaneous tumour has never been discovered.Even when treated with carcinogenic chemicals, these remarkable rodents were incredibly resistant to cancer.Most animals rely on cells detecting a cancerous malfunction and shutting themselves down (programmed cell death or "apoptosis"), but the blind mole rat's immune system attacks tumours and causes "necrosis" instead. The new study reports that genes involved in this immune defence have been favoured by evolution, and some have been expanded or duplicated.All this may have happened because one of the key mediators of the normal cell-shutdown defence, a protein called p53, is mutated in the mole rats as part of their adaptation to low oxygen.The mole rat spends its entire life under the ground, where oxygen is scarce. In other animals this would send p53 into overdrive. "When there is low oxygen, in other species, normal p53 would mean that some cells would die from apoptosis - but not in blind mole rats, because that would be a disaster," said Dr Denis Larkin from the Royal Veterinary College in London, one of the study's authors.So the mole rats have evolved a unique trade-off, weakening p53 and boosting the immune system's necrotic defence, which "the cancer doesn't know how to deal with," Dr Larkin. The blind mole rat (the newly sequenced species is Spalax galili) is only distantly related to the naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber), another unusual, subterranean critter with remarkable cancer resistance.Their evolutionary histories diverged over 70 million years ago, according to calculations in the new study, and the two mole rats adapted completely separately to life underground.The new work, published in the journal Nature Communications, will help unpick those secrets and the wider adaptation of animals to difficult environments.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joanna from Geology
Scoop.it!

Trace of another world found on Moon

Trace of another world found on Moon | Science | Scoop.it
“ Researchers find evidence of the world that crashed into Earth billions of years ago to form the Moon.”
Via Catherine Russell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joanna from Science News
Scoop.it!

The moon's mysteriously uneven gravity is explained at last

The moon's mysteriously uneven gravity is explained at last | Science | Scoop.it
“A lunar mystery that has lingered for decades has finally been solved, thanks to data collected by NASA's GRAIL mission and some science detectives here on Earth.”
Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joanna from Good news from the Stars
Scoop.it!

The Moon Now Has a Better Internet Connection Than You Thanks to NASA

The Moon Now Has a Better Internet Connection Than You Thanks to NASA | Science | Scoop.it
“It's tough to find a good Internet speed without paying your cable provider through the nose to get it, but NASA can get you one... if you live on the Moon.”
Via Guillaume Decugis
more...
Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, May 29, 2014 9:56 PM

Ready to move?

Vincent Lieser's curator insight, June 3, 2014 7:28 PM

Information overflow goes interplanetary. 

Rescooped by Joanna from Contemplative Science
Scoop.it!

New Blog Alert: Hallucinations and hysterias - The science of imagining things

New Blog Alert: Hallucinations and hysterias - The science of imagining things | Science | Scoop.it
"This blog will cover lucid dreaming, psychosis, schizophrenia, paranormal and metaphysical experiences, as well as the placebo and nocebo effects, hypnosis and psychogenic illness. It is a wide range of sub-topics but they all involve the illusion of sensory perception in the absence of external stimulus or the physiological manifestations of mental perception that is shaped by suggestion. In other words, at work is a faulty or highly fluid interaction between an individual’s internal mental world and the external world." Looking forward to it!
Via Eileen Cardillo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joanna from ScienceStuff
Scoop.it!

Drew Berry: Animations of unseeable biology | Video on TED.com

“ We have no ways to directly observe molecules and what they do -- Drew Berry wants to change that. In this talk, he shows his scientifically accurate (and entertaining!) animations that help researchers see unseeable processes within our own cells.”
Via KeeterScience
more...
KeeterScience's curator insight, July 25, 2013 3:55 PM

Cell Structure and Function

 

Rescooped by Joanna from IB Biology
Scoop.it!

The Origins of Life

Hazen, a mineralogist, is investigating how the first organic chemicals—the kind found in living things—formed and then found each other nearly four billion years ago. He began this research in 1996, about two decades after scientists discovered hydrothermal vents—cracks in the deep ocean floor where water is heated to hundreds of degrees Fahrenheit by molten rock. The vents fuel strange underwater ecosystems inhabited by giant worms, blind shrimp and sulfur-eating bacteria. Hazen and his colleagues believed the complex, high-pressure vent environment—with rich mineral deposits and fissures spewing hot water into cold—might be where life began. Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/The-Origins-of-Life.html#ixzz2biFL7wJU Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter
Via jlinzel
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joanna from Robots and Robotics
Scoop.it!

Are the robots about to rise? Google's new director of engineering thinks so…

Are the robots about to rise? Google's new director of engineering thinks so… | Science | Scoop.it
“ Ray Kurzweil popularised the 'singularity' concept, when artificial intelligence overtakes human thinking. Now he is trying to make it a reality for Google. Carole Cadwalladr meets him”
Via ROBOLUTION CAPITAL, Kalani Kirk Hausman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joanna from Astronomy news
Scoop.it!

How Big Is The Universe?

Beakus were commissioned to create three animated films that explain key concepts about our universe, with humour helping to explain the 'almost' unexplainable!…
Via Marcelo Bassani de Freitas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joanna from Seeking innovation and science
Scoop.it!

The Best Candidates For Earth 2.0

The Best Candidates For Earth 2.0 | Science | Scoop.it
“ The end is imminent.”
Via Ike Cerrada
more...
Ike Cerrada's curator insight, April 22, 2014 10:15 AM

Sometime we will have to escape our own planet. Where will be heading to? Probably to one of these.

Rescooped by Joanna from Natural Products Chemistry Breaking News
Scoop.it!

Can You Patent A Natural Product? Prepare For a Different Answer.

Can You Patent A Natural Product? Prepare For a Different Answer. | Science | Scoop.it
So, can you patent naturally occurring substances, or not? That's a rather complicated question, and some recent Supreme Court decisions have recomplicated it in US patent law. Mayo v. Prometheus and Assoc. Mol. Pathology v. Myriad Genetics. The latter, especially, has sent the PTO (and the IP lawyers) back to staring out their respective windows, thinking about what to do next.The Patent Office has now issued new guidelines for its examiners in light of these rulings, though, and things may be changing. Previous standards for patenting naturally occurring compounds have been tightened up - if I'm reading this correctly, no longer is the process of isolation and purification itself seen as enough of a modification to make a case for patentability. The four "judicial exception" categories, to be used in patentability decisions, are (1) abstract ideas, (2) laws of nature, (3) natural phenomena, and (4) natural products. And examiners are specifically asked to determine if a patent application's claims recite something "significantly different" than these.
Via NatProdChem
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joanna from Science News
Scoop.it!

Scientists solve 3.5 billion-year-old mystery of life and its link to meteorites

Scientists solve 3.5 billion-year-old mystery of life and its link to meteorites | Science | Scoop.it
“The importance of this finding is that it provides the missing ingredient in the origin-of-life recipe: a form of phosphorus that can be readily incorporated into essential biological molecules,” said Roger Buick, a co-author of the study.
Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joanna from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Biological comlexity of other worlds: Milky Way may have 100 million life-giving planets

Biological comlexity of other worlds: Milky Way may have 100 million life-giving planets | Science | Scoop.it
Are we alone? It seems highly unlikely, based on a new study. There are some 100 million other places in the Milky Way galaxy that could support life above the microbial level, reports a group of astronomers in the journal Challenges (open access), based on a new computation method to examine data from planets orbiting other stars in the universe.“This study does not indicate that complex life exists on that many planets; we’re saying that there are planetary conditions that could support it, according to the paper’s authors*. “Complex life doesn’t mean intelligent life — though it doesn’t rule it out or even animal life — but simply that organisms larger and more complex than microbes could exist in a number of different forms,” the researchers explain.The scientists surveyed more than 1,000 planets and used a formula that considers planet density, temperature, substrate (liquid, solid or gas), chemistry, distance from its central star and age. From this information, they developed and computed the Biological Complexity Index (BCI).The BCI calculation revealed that 1 to 2 percent of the planets showed a BCI rating higher than Europa, a moon of Jupiter thought to have a subsurface global ocean that may harbor forms of life. With about 10 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy, the BCI yields 100 million plausible planets.The authors cite one study that suggests that “some exoplanets may be more optimally suited for life than Earth. … Such ‘superhabitable’ worlds would likely be larger, warmer, and older, orbiting dwarf stars.”“It seems highly unlikely that we are alone,” say the researchers. “We are likely so far away from life at our level of complexity that a meeting with such alien forms might be improbable for the foreseeable future.”* Alberto Fairén, Cornell research associate; Louis Irwin, University of Texas at El Paso (lead author); Abel Méndez, University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo; and Dirk Schulze-Makuch, Washington State University.References: - Louis N. Irwin et al., Assessing the Possibility of Biological Complexity on Other Worlds, with an Estimate of the Occurrence of Complex Life in the Milky Way Galaxy, Challenges, 2014, DOI: 10.3390/challe5010159 (open access)
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joanna from Science News
Scoop.it!

NASA | SDO: Three Years of Sun in Three Minutes

“Music: "A Lady's Errand of Love" - composed and performed by Martin Lass In the three years since it first provided images of the sun in the spring of 2010, ...”
Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joanna from Science News
Scoop.it!

How to Learn a Language Quickly

How to Learn a Language Quickly | Science | Scoop.it
“Simulations show that you can learn the meaning of words rapidly if you assume that every object has only one word associated with it.”
Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
robyns tut's curator insight, October 14, 2013 1:06 PM

This helps greatly with language students here at rhodes. Find out what is the difference between this learning style and the ordinary ones and what ordinary language learning styles are.

-Tanah

Ro Atkinson's curator insight, November 21, 2013 7:06 PM

I saw this a while ago and forgot about it.  It is not a method towards perfect language learning but it is a route to sufficient language learning.

Rescooped by Joanna from Science News
Scoop.it!

Scientists solve 3.5 billion-year-old mystery of life and its link to meteorites

Scientists solve 3.5 billion-year-old mystery of life and its link to meteorites | Science | Scoop.it
“The importance of this finding is that it provides the missing ingredient in the origin-of-life recipe: a form of phosphorus that can be readily incorporated into essential biological molecules,” said Roger Buick, a co-author of the study.
Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joanna from IB Biology
Scoop.it!

All humans may be 'Martians': Growing evidence that all life on Earth came 'on a rock' from Mars

All humans may be 'Martians': Growing evidence that all life on Earth came 'on a rock' from Mars | Science | Scoop.it
“ 'The evidence seems to be building that we are actually all Martians; that life started on Mars and came to Earth on a rock'”
Via jlinzel
more...
jlinzel's curator insight, August 30, 2013 10:32 AM

Incredible suggestions require incredible evidence. I suggest you, dear reader, look up Steven Brenner and the "Westheimer Institute for Science and Technology in Gainesville, Florida". You can also read the comments below. Get back to me after you've done this. 

Rescooped by Joanna from ScienceNow
Scoop.it!

Storytelling Of Science: Bill Nye

Bill Nye, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, theoretical physicist Brian Greene, Science Friday's Ira Flatow, popular science fiction writer Neal Stephenson, executive director of the World Science Festival Tracy Day, and Origins Project director Lawrence Krauss as they discuss the stories behind cutting edge science from the origin of the universe to a discussion of exciting technologies that will change our future. They demonstrate how to convey the excitement of science and the importance helping promote a public understanding of science. (Video by Black Chalk Productions via the Origins Project)
Via Jasmin Rez, iSargantana
more...
Jasmin Rez's curator insight, April 24, 2013 3:28 AM

"They discuss the stories behind cutting edge science from the origin of the universe to a discussion of exciting technologies that will change our future. They demonstrate how to convey the excitement of science and the importance helping promote a public understanding of science." 

Rescooped by Joanna from Robots and Robotics
Scoop.it!

9 Robots That Are Stealing Our Jobs

9 Robots That Are Stealing Our Jobs | Science | Scoop.it
“ 9 Robots That Are Stealing Our Jobs AOL Jobs Kurzweil's predictions have pegged such a time as still being many years away (our brains will supposedly be powered by computers in 2035), but already in the here and now, we have early examples of how...”
Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Joanna from Good news from the Stars
Scoop.it!

This Nature video explains why the recent big bang evidence discovery is such a big deal

Scientists from the Centre for Astrophysics have found evidence of gravitational waves created mere moments after the dawn of the Universe. These waves were created in a period of rapid expansion called cosmic inflation. This new evidence could prove the definitive confirmation of the inflation theory. It seems that finally, scientists can claim to understand the goings on at the beginning of everything.
Via Guillaume Decugis
more...
Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, March 17, 2014 9:11 PM

The recent discovery of the first direct evidence of cosmic inflation is a big deal: until now, the Big Bang has only been a theory.


Until now.

Rescooped by Joanna from Seeking innovation and science
Scoop.it!

Google Is Officially Bankrolling the Robot Uprising

Google Is Officially Bankrolling the Robot Uprising | Science | Scoop.it
“ The first super-strong, agile, perceptive, and autonomous cyborg gets closer in a single buy.”
Via Ike Cerrada
more...
Ike Cerrada's curator insight, April 21, 2014 11:51 AM

Google might be preparing its own robot army in the best Terminator fashion.

Rescooped by Joanna from Astronomy news
Scoop.it!

Faraway Moon or Faint Star? Possible Exomoon Found

Faraway Moon or Faint Star? Possible Exomoon Found | Science | Scoop.it
Faraway Moon or Faint Star? Possible Exomoon Found
Via Marcelo Bassani de Freitas
more...
No comment yet.