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The 50 Greatest Breakthroughs Since the Wheel

The 50 Greatest Breakthroughs Since the Wheel | Science | Scoop.it
Why did it take so long to invent the wheelbarrow? Have we hit peak innovation? What our list reveals about imagination, optimism, and the nature of progress.

Via Dolores Gende
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from Understanding Physics
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Re-Defining Failure

Re-Defining Failure | Science | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter, Gary Faust
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 16, 2013 7:55 PM

Check out the notes from the talk above, consider watching the video embedded within the post and think about new ways to work with your students this year about the concept of failure. If you are an engineer failure you understand that failure is a teaching tool, allowing you to improve the project, but in education most students consider failure just that...they have failed. A couple of quotes found in this visalization are below. What are your thoughts as you read them?

* Have courage. It's not easy to do new things!

* No failure means no risk which means nothing new.

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Rockets at East Islip Middle School launch curiosity in young minds - Newsday

Rockets at East Islip Middle School launch curiosity in young minds - Newsday | Science | Scoop.it
Rockets at East Islip Middle School launch curiosity in young minds Newsday After learning about rocketry, the Space Race and Newton's three laws of motion in class, 21 East Islip Middle School technology students on Thursday launched handmade...
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Here Are Some Questions I Use For Class Closing Activities — What Are Yours?

Here Are Some Questions I Use For Class Closing Activities — What Are Yours? | Science | Scoop.it
"I've previously written about research on the importance of “good endings.” It’s a priority for me to end my classes on an upbeat note, but I’ve been thinking lately that I might be able to enhance its benefit to students if I’m a bit more intentional about it with a regular formal closing activity that might take a minute or two. I’ve certainly often done this, but I’m going to try doing it more like 70-80% of the time instead of its present 50%."
Via Beth Dichter, Gary Faust
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from Physics
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MAGNETS: How Do They Work?

“ The Conquest Continues over on Veritasium: http://bit.ly/VEMagnets_m THANK YOU to our amazing Subbable.com subscribers whose donations help keep MinutePhysic...”
Via Simon Dale
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from Stars, Sun, Exoplanets
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This Planetary Nebula Comes With a Twist

This Planetary Nebula Comes With a Twist | Science | Scoop.it
“ From the Cat’s Eye to the Eskimo, planetary nebulae are arguably among the most dazzling objects in the Universe. These misnamed stellar remnants are crea”
Via Pascal Petit
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from Physics as we know it.
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Male brain vs female brain: How do they differ?

Male brain vs female brain: How do they differ? | Science | Scoop.it
“ Male and female brains differ in structure and function, but we don't know how these differences affect behaviour Chapter 16 of my book, 50 Human Brain Ideas You Really Need to Know.”
Via Gary Bamford
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from Amazing Science
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Classification of cell death: How do cells die?

Classification of cell death: How do cells die? | Science | Scoop.it
Cell death can be classified according to its morphological appearance (which may be apoptotic, necrotic, autophagic or associated with mitosis), enzymological criteria (with and without the involvement of nucleases or of distinct classes of proteases, such as caspases, calpains, cathepsins and transglutaminases), functional aspects (programmed or accidental, physiological or pathological) or immunological characteristics (immunogenic or non-immunogenic). The Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) has formulated a first round of recommendations in 2005, in Cell Death and Differentiation. Since then, the field of cell death research has continued its expansion, significant progress has been made and new putative cell death modalities have been described. The NCCD provides a forum in which names describing distinct modalities of cell death are critically evaluated and recommendations on their definition and use are formulated, hoping that a non-rigid, yet uniform, nomenclature will facilitate the communication among scientists and ultimately accelerate the pace of discovery. As it stands now, three distinct routes of cellular catabolism can be defined according to morphological criteria, namely apoptosis (which is a form of cell death), autophagy (which causes the destruction of a part of the cytoplasm, but mostly avoids cell death) and necrosis (which is another form of cell death). Although frequently employed in the past, the use of Roman numerals (i.e., type I, type II and type III cell death, respectively) to indicate these catabolic processes should be abandoned. Moreover, several critiques can be formulated against the clear-cut distinction of different cell types in the triad of apoptosis, autophagic cell death and necrosis. First, although this vocabulary was originally introduced based on observations of developing animals, it has rapidly been adopted to describe the results of in vitro studies performed on immortalized cell lines, which reflect very poorly the physiology of cell death in vivo. In tissues, indeed, dying cells are usually engulfed well before signs of advanced apoptosis or necrosis become detectable. Thus, it may be acceptable - if the irreversibility of these phenomena is demonstrated - to assess caspase activation and/or DNA fragmentation to diagnose apoptotic cell death in vivo. Second, there are numerous examples in which cell death displays mixed features, for instance with signs of both apoptosis and necrosis, a fact that lead to the introduction of terms like ‘necroapoptosis’ and ‘aponecrosis’ (whose use is discouraged by the NCCD to avoid further confusion). Similarly, in the involuting D. melanogaster salivary gland, autophagic vacuolization is synchronized with signs of apoptosis, and results from genetic studies indicate that caspases and autophagy act in an additive manner to ensure cell death in this setting. Altogether, these data argue against a clear-cut and absolute distinction between different forms of cell death based on morphological criteria. Third (and most important), it would be a desideratum to replace morphological aspects with biochemical/functional criteria to classify cell death modalities. Unfortunately, there is no clear equivalence between morphology and biochemistry, suggesting that the ancient morphological terms are doomed to disappear and to be replaced by truly biochemical definitions. In this context, ‘loss-of-function’ and ‘gain-of function’ genetic approaches (e.g., RNA interference, knockout models and plasmid-driven overexpression systems) represent invaluable tools to characterize cell death modes with more precision, but only if such interventions truly reduce/augment the rate of death, instead of changing its morphological appearance (as it is often the case). Present cell death classifications are reminiscent of the categorization of tumors that has been elaborated by pathologists over the last one and a half centuries. As old morphological categorizations of tumors are being more and more supported (and will presumably be replaced) by molecular diagnostics (which allows for a more sophisticated stratification of cancer subtypes based on molecular criteria), the current catalog of cell death types is destined to lose its value as compared with biochemical/functional tests. In the end, such efforts of classification are only justified when they have a prognostic and/or predictive impact, allowing the matching of each individual cancer with the appropriate therapy. Similarly, a cell death nomenclature will be considered useful only if it predicts the possibilities to pharmacologically/genetically modulate (induce or inhibit) cell death and/or if it predicts the consequences of cell death in vivo, with regard to inflammation and recognition by the immune system.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from Conformable Contacts
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Geology | Creation Science 4 Kids

Geology | Creation Science 4 Kids | Science | Scoop.it
An excellent collection of geology-themed posts from a creationist blogger who writes for a young audience.
Via YEC Geo
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from PhysicsLearn
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Real-World Problems | RELATE

Real-World Problems | RELATE | Science | Scoop.it

Using real data to answer authentic problems


Via Dolores Gende
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from PhysicsLearn
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Usain Bolt vs. Gravity

Who's faster over 10 meters - the fastest sprinter in the world, or gravity? Also, explore a map of the big bang! http://www.bigbangregistry.com MinutePhysic...

Via Dolores Gende
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Cristiane Tavolaro's curator insight, December 17, 2012 2:51 PM

Usain Bolt... sabe tudo de física!!!

Rescooped by Fred Snyder from PhysicsLearn
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US NSF - News - The Science of Speed

US NSF - News - The Science of Speed | Science | Scoop.it

Via Dolores Gende
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Dolores Gende's curator insight, December 28, 2012 6:16 AM

The Science of Speed explains the scientific principles that are so essential to the NASCAR experience. Viewers learn how science makes cars powerful, agile, fast and safe--and how these same principles affect their own cars.

Rescooped by Fred Snyder from PhysicsLearn
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Edison’s Cradle? A Kinetic Toy Reinvented with Light | Colossal

Edison’s Cradle? A Kinetic Toy Reinvented with Light | Colossal | Science | Scoop.it

Via Dolores Gende
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Dolores Gende's curator insight, February 8, 2013 3:12 AM

Class project anyone?

Rescooped by Fred Snyder from PhysicsLearn
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Penguin Physics: Torque and Precession

Credit goes to: Xiangjun Shi Ana Kim Sarah Schade Adam Scherlis

Via Dolores Gende
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from PhysicsLearn
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Introduction to Measurement (advanced high school/intro college level)

Introduction to Measurement (advanced high school/intro college level) | Science | Scoop.it
30-page illustrated guide to fundamentals of measurement. This is intended to be a clear, comprehensive overview of effective measurement technique. Intended for advanced high school or introductory college level ...

Via Dolores Gende
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Students make magic with chemistry - Quad City Times

Students make magic with chemistry - Quad City Times | Science | Scoop.it
Students make magic with chemistry
Quad City Times
Four girls from Dan Olson's science class at Wilson Middle School in Moline were furiously taking notes.
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from Quantum Physics
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Parallel Universes: Many Worlds

“ Subscribe to MinutePhysics - it's FREE! References Non-Equilibrium Pilot Wave model: http://arxiv.org/pdf/0811.0810.pdf AND http://arxiv.org/pdf/1001.2758.pd...”;
Via Warren Huelsnitz
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from Physics
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Kinematics of Grasshopper Hops - Smarter Every Day 102

“ Download your free Audio Book Here: http://bit.ly/AudibleSED I'll randomly select 2 people who do the math and send them a free 100th episode poster! Show yo...”
Via José Gonçalves
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from Quantum Physics
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A Capella Science - Rolling in the Higgs (Adele Parody)

“ Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/acapellascience FINALLY BACK ON ITUNES! http://bit.ly/TK07dV Like me on facebook! http://www.facebook.com/acapellascience T...”
Via Warren Huelsnitz
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from Science: resources for South African teachers
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Can We Survive the Sun's Death? by AsapScience

Can We Survive the Sun's Death? by AsapScience | Science | Scoop.it
“AsapSCIENCE host Mitchell Moffit explores whether humans could live through the Sun's eventual expansion in his latest video, "Can We Survive The Sun's Death?" submitted via Laughing Squid Tips”
Via Andrew van Zyl
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from Space & Time
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New ideas for how Earth core formed

New ideas for how Earth core formed | Science | Scoop.it
Experiments on samples of iron and rock held at immense pressures have led to new ideas of how Earth's core formed.
Via Michele Diodati
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Rescooped by Fred Snyder from PhysicsLearn
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Pablo's Physics

Pablo's Physics | Science | Scoop.it

Via Dolores Gende
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MicroLabs - Effective, brief, hands-on science experiments.

MicroLabs - Effective, brief, hands-on science experiments. | Science | Scoop.it

47 easy demos that could be used as mini-labs.


Via Dolores Gende
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Benjamin Franklin and Electrostatics

Benjamin Franklin and Electrostatics | Science | Scoop.it

A Comprehensive Collection of Franklin's Electrical Works and a lab manual 'Ben Franklin As My Lab Partner - Experiments in Electrostatics'


Via Dolores Gende
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Cristiane Tavolaro's curator insight, December 14, 2012 2:41 PM

Material interessante para História da Ciência.

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Understanding the Cavendish Experiment

Understanding the Cavendish Experiment | Science | Scoop.it
Henry Cavendish, in 1798, performed the experiment that can be used to measure the gravitational constant, G, however Cavendish calculated Earth's density not G.

Via Dolores Gende
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Marc Reif's comment, January 24, 2013 6:10 AM
Cool. The article referenced in this page is here, for everybody to read: http://archive.org/details/philtrans01861213