science
4 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Marine worm produces dazzling bioluminescent display in the form of puffs of light released into seawater

Marine worm produces dazzling bioluminescent display in the form of puffs of light released into seawater | science | Scoop.it

Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and their colleagues are unraveling the mechanisms behind a little-known marine worm that produces a dazzling bioluminescent display in the form of puffs of blue light released into seawater.

 

Found around the world in muddy environments, from shallow bays to deeper canyons, the light produced by the Chaetopterus marine worm—commonly known as the "parchment tube worm" due to the opaque, cocoon-like cylinders where it makes its home—is secreted as a slimy bioluminescent mucus.

 

The mucus, which the worms are able to secrete out of any part of their body, hasn't been studied by scientists in more than 50 years. But two recent studies have helped reignite the quest to decode the inner workings of the worm's bioluminescence.

 

In one study, published in the journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, Scripps Associate Research Scientist Dimitri Deheyn and his colleagues at Georgetown University describe details of Chaetopterus's light production as never before. Through data derived from experiments conducted inside Scripps Oceanography's Experimental Aquarium, the researchers characterized specific features of the worm's light, tracing back its generation to a specific "photoprotein" tied to bioluminescence.

"The fact that the light is produced as a long glow without direct oxygen consumption is attractive for a range of future biotechnological applications," added Deheyn, whose current work focuses on identifying the specific protein(s) involved in the light production.

 

The present study, however, focused on the general biochemistry and optical properties of the light production. "We have shown that the mucus produces a long-lasting glow of blue light, which is unique for this environment where bioluminescence is usually produced as short-lived flashes of light in the green spectrum, especially for benthic (seafloor) species," said Deheyn, who added that green travels farthest and is therefore the easiest to detect in shallow coastal environments.

 

As for the light's ecological function, the researchers speculate that the luminous mucus may serve as a trap to attract prey, a deterrent to ward off certain unwelcome guests into the worm's living areas (the glowing mucus could stick to an intruder, making it more visible to its own predators), or possibly serve as a substance to build the worms' flaky, tube-shaped homes.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

A single-atom light switch

A single-atom light switch | science | Scoop.it

With just a single atom, light can be switched between two fiber optic cables at the Vienna University of Technology. Such a switch enables quantum phenomena to be used for information and communication technology.

 

Fiber optic cables are turned in to a quantum lab: scientists are trying to build optical switches at the smallest possible scale in order to manipulate light. At the Vienna University of Technology, this can now be done using a single atom. Conventional glass fibre cables, which are used for internet data transfer, can be interconnected by tiny quantum systems.

Professor Arno Rauschenbeutel and his team at the Vienna University of Technology capture light in so-called "bottle resonators". At the surface of these bulgy glass objects, light runs in circles. If such a resonator is brought into the vicinity of a glass fibre which is carrying light, the two systems couple and light can cross over from the glass fibre into the bottle resonator.

 

"When the circumference of the resonator matches the wavelength of the light, we can make one hundred percent of the light from the glass fiber go into the bottle resonator – and from there it can move on into a second glass fiber", explains Arno Rauschenbeutel.


This system, consisting of the incoming fiber, the resonator and the outgoing fiber, is extremely sensitive: "When we take a single Rubidium atom and bring it into contact with the resonator, the behaviour of the system can change dramatically", says Rauschenbeutel. If the light is in resonance with the atom, it is even possible to keep all the light in the original glass fiber, and none of it transfers to the bottle resonator and the outgoing glass fiber. The atom thus acts as a switch which redirects light one or the other fiber.

 

In the next step, the scientists plan to make use of the fact that the Rubidium atom can occupy different quantum states, only one of which interacts with the resonator. If the atom occupies the non-interacting quantum state, the light behaves as if the atom was not there. Thus, depending on the quantum state of the atom, light is sent into either of the two glass fibers. This opens up the possibility to exploit some of the most remarkable properties of quantum mechanics: "In quantum physics, objects can occupy different states at the same time", says Arno Rauschenbeutel. The atom can be prepared in such a way that it occupies both switch states at once. As a consequence, the states "light" and "no light" are simultaneously present in  each of the two glass fiber cables.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Wearable tech: It’s not a device, it’s a whole new system

Wearable tech: It’s not a device, it’s a whole new system | science | Scoop.it
Building hardware for the wearables market is only the first challenge companies need to master. For a truly differentiated experience, they must build out a service.

 

Wearable computing, or wearables, has recently moved from the realm of science fiction and military technology to being on the cusp of commonplace consumer technology. ABI Research estimates the global market for wearables in health and fitness could reach 170 million devices by 2017. Adding further momentum to the growth of the market is the entry of most of the major platforms into the space, including Google, Microsoft and Apple.

 

The first several decades of wearable computing failed to produce any notable success stories on the consumer front, but advances in materials sciences, battery power, augmented reality and chip evolution have made the possibilities for wearables grow rapidly.

 

Google’s recent unveiling of Project Glass has garnered a great deal of attention, but the market is much broader and includes fashion, health and wellness technologies, and technologies for the aging and disabled. As the quantified-self trend gains traction the use of wearables will grow too. This report covers wearables across these verticals as well as provides examples of how applications developed in one area can enable blue-ocean strategies to open up new market opportunities.

 

Blue-ocean strategies imply not competing with existing market competitors but instead opening up the market space, or blue ocean, to make the competition irrelevant.

 

Finally, one of the more interesting aspects of wearable computing is the potential impact it could have on the form function of mobiles down the road. Much of the functionality of a smartphone can currently be rendered within a wearable device, and as wearable devices become more common over the next decade mainstream devices such as the cell phone may be rethought.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

The physics of iOS 7

The physics of iOS 7 | science | Scoop.it
As soon as iOS 7 made it into the hands of millions of iPhone, iPad and iPod touch users, we began to hear scattered reports of people becoming physically sick when watching the parallax view and zoom in/out animations.

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Geology
Scoop.it!

Evidence That Organic Material Can Survive the Impact of a Meteorite

Evidence That Organic Material Can Survive the Impact of a Meteorite | science | Scoop.it
In a newly published study, researchers from the Natural History Museum provide the first evidence that any organic material, either inside a meteorite or already on Earth, can survive the impact of a meteorite striking the planet at high speed.

Via Catherine Russell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

First remote virtual surgery performed via Google Glass

First remote virtual surgery performed via Google Glass | science | Scoop.it

A University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) surgical team has performed one of the first surgeries using a telepresence augmented reality technology from VIPAAR in conjunction with Google Glass.

 

The combination of the two technologies could be an important step toward the development of useful, practical telemedicine.

VIPAAR (Virtual Interactive Presence in Augmented Reality) is commercializing a UAB-developed technology that provides real-time, two-way, interactive video conferencing.

 

UAB orthopedic surgeon Brent Ponce, M.D., performed a shoulder replacement surgery Sept. 12 at UAB Highlands Hospital in Birmingham. Watching and interacting with Ponce via the VIPAAR technology was Phani Dantuluri, M.D., from his office in Atlanta.

 

The VIPAAR technology allowed Dantuluri to see exactly what Ponce saw in the operating room and introduce his hands or instruments into the virtual surgical field.

 

At the same time, Ponce saw Dantuluri’s hands and instruments in his Google Glass display, along with his own field of view, as a merged-reality environment.

 

The two surgeons were able to discuss the case in a truly interactive fashion since Dantuluri could watch Ponce perform the surgery and simultaneously introduce his hands or instruments into Ponce’s view as if they were standing next to each other during the case.

 

“It’s real-time, real-life, right there, as opposed to a Skype or video conference call, which allows for dialogue back and forth but is not really interactive,” said Ponce.

 

UAB physicians say this kind of technology could greatly enhance patient care by allowing a veteran surgeon to remotely provide valuable expertise to less experienced surgeons.


Via Ray and Terry's , Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, November 14, 2013 5:50 PM

A great example of how Google Glass technology will bring new concepts to many industries.

Femina Gowtham's curator insight, February 6, 2015 6:27 AM

http://www.ojasortho.com/

Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Space & Time
Scoop.it!

Evidence of 3.5 billion-year-old bacterial ecosystems found in Australia

Evidence of 3.5 billion-year-old bacterial ecosystems found in Australia | science | Scoop.it

A new study from a team including Carnegie’s Nora Noffke, a visiting investigator, and Robert Hazen revealed the well-preserved remnants of a complex ecosystem in a nearly 3.5 billion-year-old sedimentary rock sequence in Australia. Their work is published in Astrobiology.


Via Michele Diodati
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dan Ustilovsky
Scoop.it!

The toymaker and his dream

The toymaker and his dream | science | Scoop.it
Meet science-innovator Arvind Gupta who has made Science exciting to millions of children across the world through his ‘toys from trash’ (Science-innovator Arvind Gupta has made #science exciting through his ‘toys from trash’
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dan Ustilovsky
Scoop.it!

Massive Antarctic iceberg sets sail

Massive Antarctic iceberg sets sail | science | Scoop.it
After lingering in its birthing bay for nearly six months, an Antarctic iceberg the size of Singapore is finally heading out to sea (Huge rogue iceberg tracked: http://t.co/xuhb3a9Uib)...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

ITER, the multibillion-euro international nuclear-fusion experiment with goal to generate power by 2028

ITER, the multibillion-euro international nuclear-fusion experiment with goal to generate power by 2028 | science | Scoop.it

Delays in the installation of key parts of ITER, a multibillion-euro international nuclear-fusion experiment, are forcing scientists to change ITER’s research programme to focus exclusively on the key goal of generating power by 2028. As a result, much research considered non-essential to the target, including some basic physics and studies of plasmas aimed at better understanding industrial-scale fusion, will be postponed. A 21-strong expert panel of international plasma scientists and ITER staff, convened to reassess the project’s research plan in the light of the construction delays. The plans were discussed at a meeting of ITER’s Science and Technology Advisory Committee (STAC). The meeting is the start of a year-long review by ITER to try to keep the experiment on track to generate 500 MW of power from an input of 50 MW by 2028, and so hit its target of attaining the so-called Q ≥ 10,where power output is ten times input or more.

 

ITER, which will be the world’s largest tokamak thermonuclear reactor (see ‘A fusion of ideas’), is being built in St-Paul-lez-Durance in southern France by the European Union, China, India, Japan, South Korea, Russia and the United States at a cost of €15 billion (US$20.3 billion). Q ≥ 10 is seen as its raison d’être, and achieving it would be likely to revitalize public and political interest in fusion. Crucial to that is getting to the point, scheduled for 2027, when the first nuclear fuel would be injected into the reactor. The fuel will be a plasma of two heavy hydrogen isotopes, deuterium and tritium (DT).

 

The original 2010 research plan foresaw the entire reactor being built by 2020, when ITER was also scheduled to produce its first plasma, using hydrogen as a test fuel. But cost-cutting and cash-flow problems in member states mean that while the reactor is likely to be operating by then, the delivery of some parts is being deferred until several years later. These include some diagnostics devices for analysing the physics of plasmas at the very large scales of ITER, and elements of the heating system that will eventually take the plasmas to 150,000,000 °C.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
odysseas spyroglou's curator insight, November 5, 2013 10:28 AM

Will such a project recharge our energy sources ?

Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

Science May Cure Alzheimer’s By Blasting It With Lasers

Science May Cure Alzheimer’s By Blasting It With Lasers | science | Scoop.it
SCIENCE!
If there is one thing scientists love to do with chronic diseases, it is blast them with lasers. In fact, we’re pretty sure any planning meeting at major medical facilities has the agenda item “Lasers: Using Them Enough?

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Quantum Hall effect created using rings of light

Quantum Hall effect created using rings of light | science | Scoop.it
Lattice of waveguides provides topological protection

 

A version of the quantum Hall effect (QHE) involving light rather than electrons has been created by physicists in the US. The team believes the demonstration could boost understanding of the QHE and perhaps lead to the development of better photonic circuits that use light to process information.

 

In recent years, physicists have sought mathematically analogous topological edge states that are easier to work with. Systems based on photons rather than electrons have drawn particular interest. However, light is not affected by a magnetic field and therefore researchers need to find another way of bending the photons. The idea of photonic topological states was first proposed in 2008 and first observed in 2009. However, these experiments still required high magnetic fields.

 

Then in 2011 Mohammad Hafezi and Jacob Taylor at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) of the University of Maryland and researchers at Harvard University proposed a true photonic topological system that would need no magnetic field. This would allow them, in principle, to be miniaturized for use in microelectronics.

This goal has been realized by Hafezi and colleagues and also by anindependent group at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany. The latter group used an array of coupled helical waveguides to make a photonic lattice with topologically protected edge states that could not be scattered by imperfections.

 

Hafezi, Taylor and colleagues at JQI took a different approach based on a lattice of ring-shaped silicon waveguides placed just nanometres apart, which allow photons to tunnel between them. To create robust topological edge states, the researchers needed something that would have the same effect on photons that a magnetic field has on electrons. This role is played by the phase change acquired by a photon as it travels around a ring-shaped silicon waveguide. "When an electron goes around a magnetic flux it acquires a phase called the Aharanov–Bohm phase," explains Hafezi. "If I have another particle – even if it's not charged – that goes around a closed loop and acquires a phase, it looks as though that particle is feeling some magnetic field."

To confirm the existence of edge states, the researchers injected photons in one corner of the lattice and found that they propagated around the sides to a collection point at the corner. To check the robustness of these states, they removed a ring and watched as the photons made a neat detour around the defect before continuing along the edge – just like a QHE edge state.

Beyond studying the QHE, the researchers believe their work could allow the precise manipulation of photons in circuits, something that is necessary to make optical analogues of electronic components. "There is no specific proposal," says Hafezi, "but now, with these skills, we have more control on the routing of photons within an array. So we hope that this will give us more knobs to tune and potentially to do logical computation with photons."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

MIT Invents A Shapeshifting Display You Can Reach Through And Touch

MIT Invents A Shapeshifting Display You Can Reach Through And Touch | science | Scoop.it
The Tangible Media Group at MIT's Media Lab has unveiled a futuristic display made of atoms not pixels.

 

We live in an age of touch-screen interfaces, but what will the UIs of the future look like? Will they continue to be made up of ghostly pixels, or will they be made of atoms that you can reach out and touch?

 

At the MIT Media Lab, the Tangible Media Group believes the future of computing is tactile. Unveiled today, the inFORM is MIT's new scrying pool for imagining the interfaces of tomorrow. Almost like a table of living clay, the inFORM is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, allowing users to not only interact with digital content in meatspace, but even hold hands with a person hundreds of miles away. And that's only the beginning.

 

Created by Daniel Leithinger and Sean Follmer and overseen by Professor Hiroshi Ishii, the technology behind the inFORM isn't that hard to understand. It's basically a fancy Pinscreen, one of those executive desk toys that allows you to create a rough 3-D model of an object by pressing it into a bed of flattened pins. With inFORM, each of those "pins" is connected to a motor controlled by a nearby laptop, which can not only move the pins to render digital content physically, but can also register real-life objects interacting with its surface thanks to the sensors of a hacked Microsoft Kinect.

 

To put it in the simplest terms, the inFORM is a self-aware computer monitor that doesn't just display light, but shape as well. Remotely, two people Skyping could physically interact by playing catch, for example, or manipulating an object together, or even slapping high five from across the planet. Another use is to physically manipulate purely digital objects. A 3-D model, for example, can be brought to life with the inFORM, and then manipulated with your hands to adjust, tweak, or even radically transform the digital blueprint.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Peer2Politics
Scoop.it!

Science and Its Skeptics

Science and Its Skeptics | science | Scoop.it
At the same time, it is facile to dismiss science itself. The most careful scientists, and the best science journalists, realize that all science is provisional. There will always be things that we haven’t figured out yet, and even some that we get wrong. But science is not just about conclusions, which are occasionally incorrect. It’s about a methodology for investigation, which includes, at its core, a relentless drive towards questioning that which came before. You can both love science and question it.

Via jean lievens
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

Solving the biggest question in physics soon? Towards a Macroscopic Quantum Superposition

Solving the biggest question in physics soon? Towards a Macroscopic Quantum Superposition | science | Scoop.it
The biggest single problem of all of physics is how to reconcile gravity and quantum mechanics,” said Philip Stamp, a theoretical physicist at the University of British Columbia.

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Astronomers reveal contents of mysterious black hole jets

Astronomers reveal contents of mysterious black hole jets | science | Scoop.it
An international team of astronomers has answered a long-standing question about the enigmatic jets emitted by black holes. Jets are narrow beams of matter spat out at high speed from near a central object, like a black hole.

 

Jets are narrow beams of matter spat out at high speed from near a central object, like a black hole. "Although they have been observed for decades, we're still not sure what they are made of, or what powers them," ESO astronomer Dr María Díaz Trigo, lead author of the study, said.

 

The team studied the radio waves and X-rays emitted by a small black hole a few times the mass of the Sun. The black hole in question was known to be active, but the team's radio observations did not show any jets, and the X-ray spectrum didn't reveal anything unusual.

 

However, a few weeks later, the team took another look and this time saw radio emissions corresponding to the sudden appearance of these jets, and even more interestingly, lines had appeared in the X-ray spectrum -- the tell-tale signature of ordinary atoms -- around the black hole.

 

"Intriguingly, we found the lines were not where they should be, but rather were shifted significantly," Dr James Miller Jones from the Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), who led the radio observations, said.

 

The same effect occurs when a siren from a vehicle changes pitch as it moves towards or away from us, as the sound wave is shortened or lengthened by the movement.

 

"It led us to conclude the particles were being accelerated to fast speeds in the jets, one directed towards Earth, and the other one in the opposite direction," team member Dr Simone Migliari from the University of Barcelona said.

 

Dr Miller-Jones said this is the first strong evidence of such particles in jets from a typical small black hole. "We've known for a long time that jets contain electrons, but haven't got an overall negative charge, so there must be something positively charged in them too," Dr Miller Jones said.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from .. And Beyond!
Scoop.it!

Apple, The Hyperion Ion Cannon And Why Future iPhones Could Have A Sapphire Screen

Apple, The Hyperion Ion Cannon And Why Future iPhones Could Have A Sapphire Screen | science | Scoop.it
Late last week we published a piece about why Apple would want to build a factory to manufacture sapphire crystal, and why it might want to own over $570M worth of that production up front.

Via Andre Bontems
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dan Ustilovsky
Scoop.it!

Nano Flowers 1, false-colored and imaged with ZEISS SEM

Nano Flowers 1, false-colored and imaged with ZEISS SEM | science | Scoop.it
The researchers dissolved barium chloride and sodium silicate into a beaker of water. Carbon dioxide from air naturally dissolves in the water, setting off a reaction which precipitates barium carbonate crystals.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dan Ustilovsky
Scoop.it!

Biometrics researchers at Purdue see world without passwords

Biometrics researchers at Purdue see world without passwords | science | Scoop.it
Some Purdue University researchers are working on technology that could see all those passwords that computer users must punch in replaced with steps such as iris and fingerprint scans. (Biometrics Researchers at Purdue See World Without Passwords.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dan Ustilovsky
Scoop.it!

How Mars evolved over 5bn years - Nasa video animation

A Nasa animation shows what scientists believe Mars would have looked like 5bn years ago and how it evolved to its current state (RT @guardianscience: How Mars evolved over 5bn years - Nasa video animation http://t.co/PTMJPkvIu5)...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dan Ustilovsky from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Astronomers answer key question: How common are habitable planets?

Astronomers answer key question: How common are habitable planets? | science | Scoop.it
UC Berkeley and University of Hawaii astronomers analyzed all four years of Kepler data in search of Earth-size planets in the habitable zones of sun-like stars, and then rigorously tested how many planets they may have missed.

 

A major question is whether planets suitable for biochemistry are common or rare in the universe. Small rocky planets with liquid water enjoy key ingredients for biology. Astronomers now used the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Kepler telescope to survey 42,000 Sun-like stars for periodic dimmings that occur when a planet crosses in front of its host star. They found 603 planets, 10 of which are Earth size and orbit in the habitable zone, where conditions permit surface liquid water. They measured the detectability of these planets by injecting synthetic planet-caused dimmings into Kepler brightness measurements. They find that 22% of Sun-like stars harbor Earth-size planets orbiting in their habitable zones. The nearest such planet may be within 12 light-years.

 

"It's been nearly 20 years since the discovery of the first extrasolar planet around a normal star. Since then we have learned that most stars have planets of some size and that Earth-size planets are relatively common in close-in orbits that are too hot for life," said Andrew Howard, a former UC Berkeley post-doctoral fellow who is now on the faculty of the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii. "With this result we've come home, in a sense, by showing that planets like our Earth are relatively common throughout the Milky Way galaxy."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.