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Rescooped by Betty Jo Moore from Amazing Science
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Stunning Map Reveals World's Earthquakes Since 1898

Stunning Map Reveals World's Earthquakes Since 1898 | Science | Scoop.it

If you've ever wondered where — and why — earthquakes happen the most, look no further than a new map, which plots more than a century's worth of nearly every recorded earthquake strong enough to at least rattle the bookshelves.

 

The map shows earthquakes of magnitude 4.0 or greater since 1898; each is marked in a lightning-bug hue that glows brighter with increasing magnitude.

 

The overall effect is both beautiful and arresting, revealing the silhouettes of Earth's tectonic boundaries in stark, luminous swarms of color. 

 

The map's maker, John Nelson, the user experience and mapping manager for IDV Solutions, a data visualization company, said the project offered several surprises.

 

"First, I was surprised by the sheer amount of earthquakes that have been recorded," Nelson told OurAmazingPlanet. "It's almost like you could walk from Seattle to Wellington [New Zealand] if these things were floating in the ocean, and I wouldn't have expected that."

 

In all, 203,186 earthquakes are marked on the map, which is current through 2003. And it reveals the story of plate tectonics itself.

 

The long volcanic seams where Earth's crust is born appear as faint, snaking lines cutting through the world's oceans. The earthquakes along these so-called spreading centers tend to be rather mild. The best studied spreading center, called the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, bisects the Atlantic Ocean, on the right side of the image.

 

Its Pacific counterpart wanders along the eastern edge of the Pacific Ocean, cutting a wide swath offshore of South America. Another spreading center makes a jog though the Indian Ocean and up through the Red Sea.

But one glance at the map shows that the real earthquake action is elsewhere. Subduction zones, the places where tectonic plates overlap and one is forced to dive deep beneath the other and into the Earth's crushing interior — a process that generates the biggest earthquakes on the planet — stand out like a Vegas light show.

 

Nelson said this concept hit home particularly for the Ring of Fire, the vast line of subduction zones around the northern and western edge of the Pacific Ocean.

 

"I have a general sense of where it is, and a notion of plate tectonics, but when I first pulled the data in and started painting it in geographically, it was magnificent," Nelson said. "I was awestruck at how rigid those bands of earthquake activity really are."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Ari Meier's curator insight, September 9, 2013 3:34 PM

This is amazing.

Rescooped by Betty Jo Moore from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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12 NASA Apps for Students to Learn about Space

12 NASA Apps for Students to Learn about Space | Science | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Betty Jo Moore from SciFrye
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New satellite maps show polar ice caps melting at 'unprecedented rate'

New satellite maps show polar ice caps melting at 'unprecedented rate' | Science | Scoop.it

Climate News Network: Scientists reveal Greenland and Antarctica losing 500 cubic kms of ice annually.

 

German researchers have established the height of the Greenland and Antarctic ice caps with greater precision than ever before. The new maps they have produced show that the ice is melting at an unprecedented rate.

 

The maps, produced with a satellite-mounted instrument, have elevation accuracies to within a few meters. Since Greenland’s ice cap is more than 2,000 meters thick on average, and the Antarctic bedrock supports 61% of the planet’s fresh water, this means that scientists can make more accurate assessments of annual melting.

 

Dr Veit Helm and other glaciologists at the Alfred Wegener Institute’sHelmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany, report in the journal The Cryosphere that, between them, the two ice sheets are now losing ice at the unprecedented rate of 500 cubic kilometres a year.

 

The measurements used to make the maps were taken by an instrument aboard the European Space Agency’s orbiting satelliteCryoSat-2. The satellite gets closer to the poles − to 88° latitude − than any previous mission and traverses almost 16m sq km of ice, adding an area of ice the size of Spain to the big picture of change and loss in the frozen world.

 

CryoSat-2’s radar altimeter transmitted 7.5m measurements of Greenland and 61m of Antarctica during 2012, enabling glaciologists to work with a set of consistent measurements from a single instrument.

 

Over a three-year period, the researchers collected 200m measurements in Antarctica and more than 14m in Greenland. They were able to study how the ice sheets changed by comparing the data with measurements made by Nasa’s IceSat mission.

 

Greenland’s volume of ice is being reduced at the rate of 375 cubic km a year. In Antarctica, the picture is more complex as the West Antarctic ice sheet is losing ice rapidly, but is growing in volume in East Antarctica.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Kim Frye
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Facts and Figures

Facts and Figures | Science | Scoop.it
NASA.gov brings you the latest images, videos and news from America's space agency. Get the latest updates on NASA missions, watch NASA TV live, and learn about our quest to reveal the unknown and benefit all humankind.
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Can animals predict earthquakes?

Can animals predict earthquakes? | Science | Scoop.it
THE idea that animals can forecast earthquakes is not a new one: the notion occurred to the Romans. For more than 2000 years, people have reported unusual animal...
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Rescooped by Betty Jo Moore from NVC Library- Geology
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NASA Images

NASA Images | Science | Scoop.it
NASA Images, a service of Internet Archive, offers public access to NASA's images, videos and audio collections.

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Rescooped by Betty Jo Moore from Topics of my interest
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Costs of missing sleep | Science News for Kids

Costs of missing sleep | Science News for Kids | Science | Scoop.it
Costs of missing sleep | Science News for Kids http://t.co/kU26cX9p...

Via Paulo Mealha
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Rescooped by Betty Jo Moore from Science News
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NASA to send another robot to Mars in 2016

NASA to send another robot to Mars in 2016 | Science | Scoop.it
Hot on the heels of Curiosity's flawless landing, NASA has just announced a brand new mission to Mars, one that will provide us with our best look yet into the Red Planet's mysterious interior.

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Rescooped by Betty Jo Moore from Using Google Drive in the classroom
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The Complete Guide to Google Drive

The Complete Guide to Google Drive | Science | Scoop.it
The Complete Guide to Google Drive Click here to download the document - The Complete Guide to Google Drive The 12 sections can also be viewed online: Section 1:  How to log into Google Drive Secti...

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Gerald Carey's curator insight, September 1, 2014 8:30 AM

I don't know why but it looks familiar.

Anyway, 12 different visual guides to using Google Drive.

There are so many available now that just about everyone should know how to use the application!

Rescooped by Betty Jo Moore from Business Transformation: Ideas to Action
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Why Is Innovation So Hard?

Why Is Innovation So Hard? | Science | Scoop.it
What business today does not want to be more innovative? In business parlance, “innovation” has reached a glorified position—like “customer centricity,” it is deemed to be a strategic necessity. But it is hard to define.

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David Ednie's curator insight, September 2, 2014 7:20 PM

Being smart is knowing what you don’t know, prioritizing what you need to know, and being very good at finding the best evidence-based answers. Being smart requires you to become comfortable saying, “I don’t know.”

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 2, 2014 8:40 PM

Innovation, creativity, and learning are hard work because they are messy, non-linear, and uncertain. They are always on the edge of chaos.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Filip Vereecke's curator insight, September 3, 2014 3:55 AM

ééntje om over na te denken

Rescooped by Betty Jo Moore from The NewSpace Daily
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Mars One To Build Simulated Colony For One-Way Astronauts

Mars One To Build Simulated Colony For One-Way Astronauts | Science | Scoop.it
People selected to live on the Red Planet will train inside an earthbound outpost. If they don't go crazy, they just might make the real trip.

Via Vincent Lieser, Nancy Kay Novak, Stratocumulus
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Rescooped by Betty Jo Moore from UpTo12-Learning
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NASA - NASA Kids' Club

NASA - NASA Kids' Club | Science | Scoop.it
NASA.gov brings you images, videos and interactive features from the unique perspective of America’s space agency.

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Rescooped by Betty Jo Moore from Mystery Science Circus
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Color-changing robot | Science News for Kids

Color-changing robot | Science News for Kids | Science | Scoop.it
Tiny tunnels within the “skin” of a robot allow it to blend in with or stand out from its surroundings (RT @sonicgeekette: Color-changing robot | Science News for Kids http://t.co/wyHIJd0K #STEM #robotics...

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Rescooped by Betty Jo Moore from Discover Sigalon Valley - Where the Tags are the Topics
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Astronomy - Picture of the Day

A different astronomy and space science
related image is featured each day, along with a brief explanation.

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