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Bioactive maca (Lepidium meyenii) alkamides are a result of traditional Andean postharvest drying practices

Bioactive maca (Lepidium meyenii) alkamides are a result of traditional Andean postharvest drying practices | science books, science magazine, science articles | Scoop.it
Highlights•

The bioactive natural product profiles of fresh and dried maca are distinct.

Bioactive amides reported for maca are exclusively present in dried hypocotyls.

Glucosinolate and lipid hydrolysis during drying results in amine and free fatty acid buildup.

Benzylamine and free fatty acid accumulation correlates well with amide synthesis.

VOC monitoring during drying allows an indirect measurement of amide accumulation.


Eliana Esparzaa,Antonella Hadzicha,Waltraud Kofera,Axel Mithöferb,Eric G. Cosioa, ,
Phytochemistry

Available online 25 March 2015



Via NatProdChem
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NatProdChem's curator insight, March 28, 2015 1:22 PM

Nice article linking phytochemical analysis and traditional Andean agricultural practices.

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Invasive Harlequin Ladybird Carries Biological Weapons Against Native ... - Science Careers Blog (subscription)

Invasive Harlequin Ladybird Carries Biological Weapons Against Native ...
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Fine-tuning emission spectra from quantum dots by photon-correlation Fourier spectroscopy in solution

Fine-tuning emission spectra from quantum dots by photon-correlation Fourier spectroscopy in solution | science books, science magazine, science articles | Scoop.it

New MIT analysis should enable development of improved color displays and biomedical monitoring systems. The new method — called photon-correlation Fourier spectroscopy in solution — makes it possible to extract single-particle spectral properties from a large group of particles. While it doesn’t tell you the spectral peak width of a specific particle, it does give you the average single-particle spectral width from billions of particles, revealing whether the individual particles produce pure colors or not.

In addition, the particles “are not isolated on a surface, but are in their natural environment, in a solution. With the traditional methods, there’s always a question: How much does the surface affect the results?

The method works by comparing pairs of photons emitted by individual particles. That doesn’t tell you the absolute color of any particular particle, but it does give a representative statistical measure of the whole collection of particles. It does this by illuminating the sample solution with a laser beam and detecting the emitted light at extremely short time scales. So while different particles are not differentiated in space, they can be differentiated in time, as they drift in and out of the narrow laser beam and are turned on by the beam.

By applying this method to the production of quantum dot nanocrystals, the MIT team can determine how well different methods of synthesizing the particles work.

“It was an open question whether the single-dot line widths were variable or not,” Cui says. Now, he and his colleagues can determine this for each variation in the fabrication process, and start to fine-tune the process to produce the most useful output for different applications.

In addition to computer displays, such particles have applications in biomedical research, where they are used as staining agents for different biochemicals. The more precise the colors of the particles are, the greater the number of different colored particles that can be used at once in a sample, each targeted to a different kind of biomolecule.

Using this method, the researchers were able to show that a widely used material for quantum dots, cadmium selenide, does indeed produce very pure colors. But, they found that other materials that could replace cadmium selenide or produce different colors, such as indium phosphide, can also have intrinsically very pure colors. Previously, this was an open question. 

Todd Krauss, a professor of chemistry at the University of Rochester who was not involved in this research, says the MIT team’s “approach is very clever and builds on what this group has done previously.” Measuring the line widths of individual particles is important, he says, in optimizing applications such as television displays and biological markers. He adds, “We should be able to make much better strides now that this technique is published, because of the ability to get single-particle line widths on many particles at once.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Graphene Paint to Power our Homes?

Graphene Paint to Power our Homes? | science books, science magazine, science articles | Scoop.it
Scientists from the University of Manchester have discovered a material which combines graphene, a one-atom thick layer of graphite, with the transition metal dichalcogenides.

 

Something straight out of a science fiction film is fastly becoming an exciting reality as scientists from the University of Manchester have discovered a material which combines graphene, a one-atom thick layer of graphite, with the transition metal dichalcogenides. The material is thin and flexible, and it can absorb sunlight to produce electricity at the same rates of existing solar panels. This could be potentially used to coat the outside of buildings to generate power required to run appliances inside.

 

The material is composed of transition metal dichalcogenides layers sandwiched between the two outer layers of graphene. The graphene acts as an extremely efficient conductive layer, and the TMDC acts as a very sensitive light absorber.

 

Researchers have found that the 'light absorption characteristic' of the material can be increased when the graphene layer is sprinkled with gold particles. The material has a quantum efficiency of 30%.

 

Researchers believe that entire buildings could be powered by coating their exposed surfaces with the panels. Further, the energy produced by the panels could be used to alter the transparency and reflectivity of windows and fixtures.

 

This type of graphene material could be used to form on the outside of the buildings to generate power required to run the appliances inside. It is flexible and easy to use.

 

Not only can graphene paint be used to power objects, the material will also be able to chaneg color.

 

Researchers also believe that the graphene base substance has the ability to create a new generation of hand-held devices such as smartphones that can be powered using sunlight. These devices can be made ultra-thin, transparent and flexible.

 

Research suggests that there can be a high level of optimism regarding the development of graphene in the near future.

 

They hope that the material can be used for a wide range of industrial and day-to-day applications, providing potential technological breakthroughs in the areas, right from electronics to telecommunications and energy generation.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Marco Bertolini's curator insight, June 7, 2013 11:41 AM

Une peinture qui révolutionne la production d'énergie : une couche large d'un atome.  Appliquée sur la façade de votre habitation, elle change la chaleur solaire en énergie électrique.  La fin des panneaux solaires ?

Nacho Vega's curator insight, June 9, 2013 4:39 PM

New material = Good news!

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DNA SEQ Alliance - Using a quantum computer to identify most potent drug candidates

DNA SEQ Alliance - Using a quantum computer to identify most potent drug candidates | science books, science magazine, science articles | Scoop.it

DNA SEQ Inc. is both a free-standing, independent and privately held enterprise as well as the centerpiece of a cluster of strategic relationships with other independent organizations which it calls the DNA-SEQ Alliance. Co-founded by noted crystallographer Janusz M. Sowadski, DNA SEQ is headquartered in La Jolla, California. DNA SEQ’s business model for its stand-alone company is two-fold: first, via its website, DNA SEQ will promote the use of its collaborative process to provide for cancer patients and their oncologists an alternative data-driven view of the nature of their disease and possible protein kinase inhibitor molecules for the oncologist to consider prescribing in the course of his or her treatment of the patient. Second, the Company will focus on drug discovery of anti-relapse drugs to fight the recurrence of cancer once initial first-in-line drugs begin to fail, which is a demonstrated and expected phenomenon.

 

DNA SEQ Inc. has taken the crucial and missing steps to make Next Generation diagnostics and treatments a reality sooner rather than later by creating a solid inter-disciplinary and cross-organization collaborative alliance with best-in-class researchers, equipped with cutting edge tools. DNA SEQ will have clients deliver a tissue sample from the pathology laboratory of the hospital where their cancerous tumors were removed directly to the Baylor College of Medicine for the best tissue sample preparation to ready the sample for genomic sequencing. DNA SEQ will then have the option of using Baylor for genomic sequencing and follow-on annotation and analytics, or it can turn to its alternative source of supply,Illumina for Next Generation Sequencing, and on to its joint venture partner Diagnomics for annotation and analytics of the data obtained from Next Generation Sequencing. This most advanced genome annotation and analysis platform will allow DNA SEQ to identify rapidly and very accurately the differences between healthy cells and cancerous cells across the entire functional human genome. Next DNA SEQ will internally construct crystallographic models of the mutated cancer cells and use the models to identify corresponding kinase inhibiting molecules from the more than 120,000 kinase inhibitors currently in existence.

 

At the same time, DNA SEQ will rely on its collaboration with founding shareholder D-Wave Systems Inc. which offers the world’s first Quantum Computing platform to speed up the process of identifying effective protein kinase inhibitor molecules, including FDA-approved drugs and molecules in clinical trials, to cause the “inhibition” or cessation of the rapid division of cells caused by cancerous mutations. Moreover, DNA SEQ will harness D-Wave’s Quantum Computing power to target FDA-approved drugs, and kinase inhibitor in clinical trials, to fight the relapse of cancer once initial first-in-line drugs begin to fail.


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Rise of jellyfish reveals sickness of world's oceans - Technology & Science - CBC News

Rise of jellyfish reveals sickness of world's oceans - Technology & Science - CBC News | science books, science magazine, science articles | Scoop.it
The rise of jellyfish populations in many of the world's oceans may be more than just an inconvenience for swimmers who want to take a dip. An expert warns it could be a sign of deteriorating marine health.

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PERPETUAL MOMENTS OF CLARITY

PERPETUAL MOMENTS OF CLARITY | science books, science magazine, science articles | Scoop.it
I heard a quote recently that states, “where there is no clarity, there is no urgency, and where there is no urgency, there is no action”. I believe this to be true. I’ve seen this very dynamic play out numerous times in corporate settings at all levels. Clarity is vital to your productivity and purpose.

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How to Hook Up an LED Light to a Battery

How to Hook Up an LED Light to a Battery | science books, science magazine, science articles | Scoop.it
An led can be hooked up to a battery in a very simple circuit, including a few components. The steps to build a simple circuit that will light an led are very simple.
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Bionic eye prototype unveiled that has iPhone camera and wirelessly transfers signal to brain

Bionic eye prototype unveiled that has iPhone camera and wirelessly transfers signal to brain | science books, science magazine, science articles | Scoop.it
A team of Australian industrial designers and scientists have unveiled their prototype for the world's first bionic eye.

 

It is hoped the device, which involves a microchip implanted in the skull and a digital camera attached to a pair of glasses, will allow recipients to see the outlines of their surroundings.

 

If successful, the bionic eye has the potential to help over 85 per cent of those people classified as legally blind.

 

With trials beginning next year, Monash University's Professor Mark Armstrong says the bionic eye should give recipients a degree of extra mobility. "There's a camera at the front and the camera is actually very similar to an iPhone camera, so it takes live action for color," he said. "And then that imagery is then distilled via a very sophisticated processor down to, let's say, a distilled signal.

 

"That signal is then transmitted wirelessly from what's called a coil, which is mounted at the back of the head and inside the brain there is an implant which consists of a series of little ceramic tiles and in each tile are microscopic electrodes which actually are embedded in the visual cortex of the brain."

 

Professor Armstrong says is it is hoped the technology will help those who completely blind, enabling them to navigate their way around.

"What we believe the recipient will see is a sort of a low resolution dot image, but enough... [to] see, for example, the edge of a table or the silhouette of a loved one or a step into the gutter or something like that," he said.


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Laws of Physics Say Quantum Cryptography Is Unhackable. It's Not | Wired Science | Wired.com

Laws of Physics Say Quantum Cryptography Is Unhackable. It's Not | Wired Science | Wired.com | science books, science magazine, science articles | Scoop.it

 

In the never-ending arms race between secret-keepers and code-breakers, the laws of quantum mechanics seemed to have the potential to give secret-keepers the upper hand. A technique called quantum cryptography can, in principle, allow you to encrypt a message in such a way that it would never be read by anyone whose eyes it isn’t for.

 

Enter cold, hard reality. In recent years, methods that were once thought to be fundamentally unbreakable have been shown to be anything but. Because of machine errors and other quirks, even quantum cryptography has its limits.

 

“If you build it correctly, no hacker can hack the system. The question is what it means to build it correctly,” said physicist Renato Renner from the Institute of Theoretical Physics in Zurich, who will present a talk on calculating the failure rate of different quantum cryptography systems at the 2013 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics in San Jose, California on June 11.

 

Regular, non-quantum encryption can work in a variety of ways but generally a message is scrambled and can only be unscrambled using a secret key. The trick is to make sure that whomever you’re trying to hide your communication from doesn’t get their hands on your secret key. Cracking the private key in a modern crypto system would generally require figuring out the factors of a number that is the product of two insanely huge prime numbers. The numbers are chosen to be so large that, with the given processing power of computers, it would take longer than the lifetime of the universe for an algorithm to factor their product.

 

But such encryption techniques have their vulnerabilities. Certain products – called weak keys – happen to be easier to factor than others. Also, Moore’s Law continually ups the processing power of our computers. Even more importantly, mathematicians are constantly developing new algorithms that allow for easier factorization.

 

Quantum cryptography avoids all these issues. Here, the key is encrypted into a series of photons that get passed between two parties trying to share secret information. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle dictates that an adversary can’t look at these photons without changing or destroying them.

“In this case, it doesn’t matter what technology the adversary has, they’ll never be able to break the laws of physics,” said physicist Richard Hughes of Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, who works on quantum cryptography.

 

But in practice, quantum cryptography comes with its own load of weaknesses. It was recognized in 2010, for instance, that a hacker could blind a detector with a strong pulse, rendering it unable to see the secret-keeping photons.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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cameron scott's curator insight, March 23, 2015 4:25 AM

This article argues over the problems of Quantum Cryptography and why it isn't as flawless as scientists make it out to be. It has been identified in this passage that even though Quantum Cryptography doesn't have the vulnerabilities that normal encryption encounters on a day to day basis,  it is still susceptible to failure due to human errors. I believe that this will always be a predicament in the IT industry due to human error being inevitable,  nonetheless every time we make a mistake we inadvertently find solutions to our existing problems.  

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Technion scientists create biological computer

Technion scientists create biological computer | science books, science magazine, science articles | Scoop.it
New Worlds: Scientists at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have developed and built a molecular transducer. (Technion scientists create biological computer: “The main advantages of biomolecular computing devices over th...
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