Science And Wonder
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Science And Wonder
Soul The Fuel of Science
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The Stars Are Beginning To Go Out… | Life, Unbounded, Scientific American Blog Network

The Stars Are Beginning To Go Out… | Life, Unbounded, Scientific American Blog Network | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
They really are.

The universe is apparently well past its prime in terms of making stars, and what new ones are being made now across the cosmos ...
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Infant stress linked to teen brain changes | Body & Brain | Science News

Infant stress linked to teen brain changes | Body & Brain | Science News | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
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The Diner at the Center of the Galaxy - NASA Science

The Diner at the Center of the Galaxy - NASA Science | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
NASA's NuSTAR spacecraft has detected X-ray flares coming from the center of the galaxy--a signal that the Milky Way's supermassive black hole is having dinner.
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Scientists discover possible building blocks of ancient genetic systems in Earth's most primitive organisms

Scientists discover possible building blocks of ancient genetic systems in Earth's most primitive organisms | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
A team of scientists announced that they have discovered AEG within cyanobacteria, which are believed to be some of the most primitive organisms on Earth.
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Is the Milky Way a Cannibal? An Astronomer Travels to the Driest Place on Earth to Find Out: Scientific American

Is the Milky Way a Cannibal? An Astronomer Travels to the Driest Place on Earth to Find Out: Scientific American | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
At the driest place on Earth, one astronomer sifts through starlight to find clues about the Milky Way's evolution.
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How Google plans to find the UnGoogleable | KurzweilAI

How Google plans to find the UnGoogleable | KurzweilAI | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
Racks of networking equipment connect servers inside a Google data center (credit: Google) Google wants to improve its mobile search services by...
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Proving quantum computers feasible | KurzweilAI

Proving quantum computers feasible | KurzweilAI | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
The possible quantum states of a chain of particles can be represented as points in space, with lines connecting states that can be swapped with no change in...
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Lake life survives in total isolation for 3000 years - life - 26 November 2012 - New Scientist

Lake life survives in total isolation for 3000 years - life - 26 November 2012 - New Scientist | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
The discovery of strange, plentiful bacteria in a lake sealed beneath ice boosts the chance that extraterrestrial life might exist...
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Allan Jones: A map of the brain | Video on TED.com

TED Talks How can we begin to understand the way the brain works? The same way we begin to understand a city: by making a map.
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P versus NP - Intro4All

http://www.science4all.org/le-nguyen-hoang/pnp/ P=NP is probably today's most crucial open problem. Not only is it a very theoretical question in computer sc...
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New Scientist TV: Driving blind video captures award-winning experiment

New Scientist TV: Driving blind video captures award-winning experiment | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
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A Slower Speed of Light Official Trailer — MIT Game Lab

A Slower Speed of Light is a first-person game in which players navigate a 3D space while picking up orbs that reduce the speed of light in increments. A cus...
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Can a Jellyfish Unlock the Secret of Immortality and Reversal of Aging?

Can a Jellyfish Unlock the Secret of Immortality and Reversal of Aging? | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it

Christian Sommer, a German marine-biology student in his early 20s, was conducting research on hydrozoans, small invertebrates that, depending on their stage in the life cycle, resemble either a jellyfish or a soft coral. Every morning, Sommer went snorkeling in the turquoise water off the cliffs of Portofino, Italy. He scanned the ocean floor for hydrozoans, gathering them with plankton nets. Among the hundreds of organisms he collected was a tiny, relatively obscure species known to biologists as Turritopsis dohrnii. Today it is more commonly known as the immortal jellyfish. Sommer kept his hydrozoans in petri dishes and observed their reproduction habits. After several days he noticed that his Turritopsis dohrnii was behaving in a very peculiar manner, for which he could hypothesize no earthly explanation. Plainly speaking, it refused to die. It appeared to age in reverse, growing younger and younger until it reached its earliest stage of development, at which point it began its life cycle anew.

 

Sommer was baffled by this development but didn’t immediately grasp its significance. (It was nearly a decade before the word “immortal” was first used to describe the species.) But several biologists in Genoa, fascinated by Sommer’s finding, continued to study the species, and in 1996 they published a paper called “Reversing the Life Cycle.” The scientists described how the species — at any stage of its development — could transform itself back to a polyp, the organism’s earliest stage of life, “thus escaping death and achieving potential immortality.” This finding appeared to debunk the most fundamental law of the natural world — you are born, and then you die. One of the paper’s authors, Ferdinando Boero, likened the Turritopsis to a butterfly that, instead of dying, turns back into a caterpillar. Another metaphor is a chicken that transforms into an egg, which gives birth to another chicken. The anthropomorphic analogy is that of an old man who grows younger and younger until he is again a fetus. For this reason Turritopsis dohrnii is often referred to as the Benjamin Button jellyfish.

 

Some progress has been made, however, in the quarter-century since Christian Sommer’s discovery. We now know, for instance, that the rejuvenation of Turritopsis dohrnii and some other members of the genus is caused by environmental stress or physical assault. We know that, during rejuvenation, it undergoes cellular transdifferentiation, an unusual process by which one type of cell is converted into another — a skin cell into a nerve cell, for instance. (The same process occurs in human stem cells.) But we still don’t understand how it ages in reverse.

 

Immortality is, to a certain degree, a question of semantics. “That word ‘immortal’ is distracting,” says James Carlton, the professor of marine sciences at Williams. “If by ‘immortal’ you mean passing on your genes, then yes, it’s immortal. But those are not the same cells anymore. The cells are immortal, but not necessarily the organism itself.” To complete the Benjamin Button analogy, imagine the man, after returning to a fetus, being born again. The cells would be recycled, but the old Benjamin would be gone; in his place would be a different man with a new brain, a new heart, a new body. He would be a clone.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Physicists Find Evidence That The Universe Is A 'Giant Brain'

Physicists Find Evidence That The Universe Is A 'Giant Brain' | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
The idea of the universe as a 'giant brain' has been proposed by scientists - and science fiction writers - for decades. But now physicists say there may be some evidence that it's actually true.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Atom Smasher Creates New Kind of Matter

Atom Smasher Creates New Kind of Matter | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
A liquidlike wave of gluons appears to have been formed at the Large Hadron Collider.
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Universe Grows Like a Giant Brain

Universe Grows Like a Giant Brain | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
New, hidden laws of nature may govern both the growth of brain or social networks and the expansion of the universe...
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A 3D printer to turn waste plastic into composting toilets, rainwater harvesting systems | KurzweilAI

A 3D printer to turn waste plastic into composting toilets, rainwater harvesting systems | KurzweilAI | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
3-D printers work like inkjet printers but create 3-dimensional objects, one layer at a time.
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2-Ton 'Alien' Horned Dinosaur Discovered

2-Ton 'Alien' Horned Dinosaur Discovered | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
The bizarre beast sported 2 spiky head horns, hooks jutting from its forehead and a ruffled neck shield.
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Canada Plans to Simulate Mars Research at Former Asbestos Mine

Canada Plans to Simulate Mars Research at Former Asbestos Mine | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
Canada's last asbestos mine, now winding down its operations, may have a new celestial calling — as a stand-in for planet Mars.
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Meet Wall-Ye: The French grape-picking robot which can work day and night - and may well put vineyard workers out of a job

Meet Wall-Ye: The French grape-picking robot which can work day and night - and may well put vineyard workers out of a job | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
The Wall-Ye V.I.N. robot, brainchild of Burgundy-based inventor Christophe Millot, is one of the robots being developed around the world aimed at vineyards struggling to find the labour they need.
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New Scientist TV: 3D-printed magic lens unscrambles hidden animations

New Scientist TV: 3D-printed magic lens unscrambles hidden animations | Science And Wonder | Scoop.it
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