Science and the F...
Follow
Find
34 views | +0 today
Science and the Future of Life
How far science changed or will change our lives?
Curated by M Moos
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by M Moos from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

Nine Things Educators Need to Know About the Brain

Nine Things Educators Need to Know About the Brain | Science and the Future of Life | Scoop.it
In an excerpt from his new book, psychologist Louis Cozolino applies the lessons of social neuroscience to the classroom.

Via Nik Peachey
more...
Γιώργος Παπαναστασίου's curator insight, April 3, 2013 2:08 PM

Ένα ωραίο άρθρο για τη λειτουργία του νου.

MCG23's curator insight, April 3, 2013 5:51 PM

interesting article that i myself can relate to in the classroom.  I have my kids doing occasional exercise in my year 8 Mathematics class and the benefits of how the classes respond after a brief exercise break is fasinating.  Alas I have not done this as much with my older students...i need to break out of this model for my senior students!

  

Mirjana Podvorac's curator insight, April 13, 2013 11:36 AM

A valuable insight! Careful not to misuse it!

Rescooped by M Moos from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

How to Get Hesitant Teachers to Use Technology

How to Get Hesitant Teachers to Use Technology | Science and the Future of Life | Scoop.it
As a tech advocate, I often find myself coaxing established educators to incorporate new tools & technologies. Here are some ways I've found to be successful.

Via Nik Peachey
more...
stevecarter's comment, April 16, 2013 3:45 AM
Much needed - thanks
stevecarter's curator insight, April 16, 2013 3:45 AM

Good start for our schools

Joyce Valenza's curator insight, April 19, 2013 5:04 PM

add your insight...

Rescooped by M Moos from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Studying the hue of alien Earths - How to screen exoplanets for signatures of life

Studying the hue of alien Earths - How to screen exoplanets for signatures of life | Science and the Future of Life | Scoop.it

In astronomy, photometry is a way of measuring the flux of the electromagnetic radiation of an astronomical object. Filter photometry basically means that you split the collected light from a celestial object only into a few wavelength bins that are defined here by the commonly used filters in the visible called 'B, V, I Johnson–Cousins filters' [or blue, green and red colour bins]. The advantage of this approach is that lots of photons are gathered per bin, meaning a good signal-to-noise ratio is achieved, which in turn means that it may be possible to characterize dimmer planets. The researchers use this method to identify planets that have surfaces similar to those on Earth that harbour life. This is done by plotting the blue–green versus blue–red bins using customized filters, creating what is known as a "color–color diagram". While the technique does not provide the finer details of a planet, it can very easily be used to put together a follow-up prioritized "target list" of planets that should be studied in detail with spectroscopy.

 

A way of looking for these extreme environments is to study the "albedo" of a planet – its reflectivity as a function of wavelength. For example, snow has a high albedo, meaning that it reflects well, while water has a low albedo and so does not reflect as well. A previous study, conducted in 2003, compared the colour–colour diagrams of rocky and Jupiter-like planets in our solar system to see whether they were the same – they were not. That study concluded that a color–color diagram can be used to make a first-order basic characterization of a planet's nature. Siddharth Hegde of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Germany and colleague Lisa Kaltenegger from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts extended this idea to rocky exoplanets based on the assumption that these habitats best determine the environmental limits for harboring Earth-type extremophiles.

 

The method is similar to another already used by exoplanet hunters who look for the "red-edge" – a telltale sign of vegetation – in the spectra of planets. This is a large and abrupt change in the absorption of light by plants that occurs at about 700 nm. At shorter wavelengths, chlorophyll absorbs very strongly and therefore plants reflect little light; above 700 nm, chlorophyll does not absorb light, which means that leaves are able to reflect much more sunlight back into space. Combining such spectral readings with color–color diagrams could clearly indicate if a planet has any Earth-like life, or is capable of harboring it. In the future, the researchers are keen to study possible changes in a planet's atmosphere caused by different kinds of extremophiles that might inhabit its surface – for the moment, their model assumes the extremophiles do not affect the atmosphere significantly. "Maybe, with the help of biologists who culture such extremophiles in the lab, we can find out if there are gases in the atmosphere that can tell us whether such surfaces really harbour life," muses Hegde.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by M Moos
Scoop.it!

Hackers backdoor the human brain, successfully extract sensitive data | ExtremeTech

Hackers backdoor the human brain, successfully extract sensitive data | ExtremeTech | Science and the Future of Life | Scoop.it
Using a commercial off-the-shelf brain-computer interface, researchers have shown that it's possible to hack your brain, forcing you to reveal information that you'd rather keep secret.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by M Moos
Scoop.it!

Live from Mars | Mars Odyssey Mission THEMIS

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by M Moos from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Tiny 'Firefly' satellite to solve mystery of extremely powerful terrestrial gamma ray flashes

Tiny 'Firefly' satellite to solve mystery of extremely powerful terrestrial gamma ray flashes | Science and the Future of Life | Scoop.it

Bursts of gamma rays usually occur far out in space, near black holes and other high-energy cosmic phenomena. Scientists were surprised when, in the mid-1990s, they found powerful gamma-ray flashes happening in the skies over Earth. Powerful natural particle accelerators in the atmosphere are behind the processes that create lightning. Terrestrial gamma rays (TGFs) result from this particle acceleration. Individual particles in a TGF contain a huge amount of energy, sometimes more than 20 mega-electron volts. The aurora borealis, for example, is powered by particles with less than one-thousandth as much energy as a TGF. But what causes a TGF's high-energy flashes? Does it trigger lightning--or does lightning trigger it? Could it be responsible for some of the high-energy particles in the Van Allen radiation belts, which can damage satellites?

 

A tiny little satellite, called CubeSat or 'Firefly - the size of a milk carton whirling in space - will soon find out. The CubeSat will look specifically for gamma-ray flashes coming from the atmosphere, not space, conducting the first focused study of TGF activity. Firefly will carry a gamma-ray detector along with a suite of instruments to detect lightning and will return the first simultaneous measurements of TGFs and lightnings. When thunderstorms happen, powerful electric fields stretch upward for miles, into the upper atmosphere. These electric fields accelerate free electrons, whirling them to speeds that are close to the speed of light. When these ultra-high-speed electrons collide with molecules in the air, they release high-energy gamma rays as well as more electrons, starting a cascade of electrons and TGFs. But unlike lightning, a TGF's energy is released as invisible gamma rays, not visible light. TGFs therefore don't produce colorful bursts of light like many lightning-related phenomena. But these unseen eruptions could help explain why brilliant lightning strikes happen.

 

More info:

NSF news release: Cubesats "Land" at National Science Foundation: http://tinyurl.com/8xwa36r
NSF news release: National Science Foundation Awards Grant to Build "CubeSats": http://tinyurl.com/d4j4exj
NSF webcast: CubeSats Come to NSF: http://tinyurl.com/bqwzho9


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by M Moos
Scoop.it!

NASA Archive Collects Great Time-Lapse Videos of our Planet

NASA Archive Collects Great Time-Lapse Videos of our Planet | Science and the Future of Life | Scoop.it
Here's the latest video release from NASA, and it's another wondrous time-lapse film from the Internal Space Station.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by M Moos
Scoop.it!

6 Great Videos on Teaching Critical Thinking ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

6 Great Videos on Teaching Critical Thinking ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Science and the Future of Life | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by M Moos from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

How can mobile devices change the way we teach and learn? - brainstorming and voting

Please add your ideas below (no need to register) also feel free to add some pros and cons of each suggestion and vote on the ones you think are the best.

Via Nik Peachey
more...
bremont Alfredo's curator insight, March 7, 2013 4:18 AM

eventtual tools

Joan Walker's comment, March 8, 2013 1:15 AM
enables learning on the go / possibilities for situated learning, just in time / authentic assessment in situ
Aurion Learning's curator insight, March 14, 2013 10:10 AM

With so much talk about mobile learning in 2012, it looked set to make a real impact in the way that eLearning was delivered, but many organisations have been slow to uptake mobile learning on a large-scale. Having said that, mlearning is starting to come into its own and will inevitably increase as more people pursue to use personal devices to learn.

Scooped by M Moos
Scoop.it!

New Insight on Mars Expected from New NASA Mission - NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

New Insight on Mars Expected from New NASA Mission - NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | Science and the Future of Life | Scoop.it
On Aug. 20, NASA announced the selection of InSight, a new Discovery-class mission that will probe Mars at new depths by looking into the deep interior of Mars.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by M Moos
Scoop.it!

Scientists develop lithium-ion battery that charges 120 times faster than normal | ExtremeTech

Scientists develop lithium-ion battery that charges 120 times faster than normal | ExtremeTech | Science and the Future of Life | Scoop.it
The team of Korean scientists believe they can build a battery pack for electric vehicles that can be fully charged in less than a minute.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by M Moos from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Real-time Earthquake Map

Real-time Earthquake Map | Science and the Future of Life | Scoop.it
USGS Earthquake Hazards Program, responsible for monitoring, reporting, and researching earthquakes and earthquake hazards...

 

This map represents the 1079 earthquakes with magnitudes higher than 2.5 that have occured in the last 30 days.  You can customize the map to display different data at any scale.  There is detailed information about each earthquake in this great dataset. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Trisha Klancar's comment, August 18, 2012 5:33 AM
I've used this often and kids love it. It is visual and allows them to realize what is happening at that very moment and PERHAPS gets them to see the world doesn't revolve around them! hee,hee
Scooped by M Moos
Scoop.it!

Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover Animation

This 11-minute animation depicts key events of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, which will launch in late 2011 and land a rover, Curiosity, on Mars in...
more...
No comment yet.