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BioTechniques - Building Computers Within Cells

BioTechniques - Building Computers Within Cells | Science and reality | Scoop.it
Researchers have successfully engineered both mammalian and bacterial cells to perform various computing operations, with numerous potential applications ranging from detecting and silencing viruses to identifying emerging pathogens....
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Synthetic-biology firms shift focus

Synthetic-biology firms shift focus | Science and reality | Scoop.it
By creating products designed to be ingested or put on the body, synthetic-biology companies are starting to attract the attention of groups that oppose the use of genetically modified (GM) organisms. But regulations governing the use and labelling of GM organisms do not apply to fermented ingredients, because the organisms used to make them are not present in the final products. Synthetic-biology companies are already marketing a few fine chemicals: engineered yeast has been used to make valencene and nootkatone, which provide the aroma of oranges and grapefruits, respectively, in perfumes and cosmetics. And at least five high-profile fine chemicals are scheduled to be released this year.
Via Marko Dolinar
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Rice synthetic biologists shine light on genetic circuits

In a new paper appearing online today in the journal Nature Methods, Tabor and colleagues, including graduate student and lead author Evan Olson, describe a new, ultra high-precision method for creating and measuring gene expression signals in bacteria by combining light-sensing proteins from photosynthetic algae with a simple array of red and green LED lights and standard fluorescent reporter genes. By varying the timing and intensity of the lights, the researchers were able to control exactly when and how much different genes were expressed.
Via Marko Dolinar
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Will Synthetic Biology Evolve Into the Next Hot Field?

Will Synthetic Biology Evolve Into the Next Hot Field? | Science and reality | Scoop.it
“Five things you should know about this growing segment that aims to modify life itself.”
Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
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Nanotech Battery Breakthrough Promises 30 Second Smartphone Charging

Nanotech Battery Breakthrough Promises 30 Second Smartphone Charging | Science and reality | Scoop.it
“VideoSmartphones are some of the most useful devices we own. However, their battery life leaves a lot to be desired. Even the most power frugal devices need to be charged daily during heavy use - something that many of us have found out to our cost. However, it's not just capacity [...]”Imagine, then, being able to charge your smartphone in 30 seconds? This could revolutionize how we use out treasured devices and could mean that their limited battery life isn’t quite as limiting as it is today. Simply find a power socket at home or work if you’re running low, and 30 seconds later you’re ready for that long commute on the train or day trip by the sea or in the mountains. Hopefully we won’t have too long to wait.
Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 24, 2014 5:44 PM

Imagine, then, being able to charge your smartphone in 30 seconds? This could revolutionize how we use out treasured devices and could mean that their limited battery life isn’t quite as limiting as it is today. Simply find a power socket at home or work if you’re running low, and 30 seconds later you’re ready for that long commute on the train or day trip by the sea or in the mountains. Hopefully we won’t have too long to wait.


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Social Media Tips to Grow Your Medical Practice

Social Media Tips to Grow Your Medical Practice | Science and reality | Scoop.it
Doctors and the administrators used to be able to be able to just concentrate on medicine. That is no longer possible. Now they have to be business people, insurance experts, marketers and much more. Here are a few social media tips to help you grow your medical practice.Create a Social Media PresenceDon’t be afraid of social media. Everyone who has a social account needs a doctor. That means that everyone who visits your Facebook, Twitter or other social media page is a prospective patient. The secret to being found online revolves around social media. The best way to be found online is to rock at social media. Of the top eight factors that impact your position on Google, seven are related to social media. So be sure to set up at least a Facebook and Google+ page. Facebook is the social media monster and is most popular with people over 30 – a perfect market for doctors.Embrace Free ListingsThere are plenty of websites that are trying to make money creating lists of service providers. Give them your information. Let them make that money spreading your contact information. Angie’s List is a great example. Angie’s List now has a special area for health care providers. Claim your business (http://business.angieslist.com). Offer a free gift to those who leave positive reviews. If someone leaves you a positive review, give them something small. You would not believe how many people Google a doctor before their first visit. Also be sure to connect with any hospitals or clinics with whom you have a relationship. Make sure they are promoting you online.Produce Content, GenuinelyPeople love doctors they trust. People hate doctors they don’t trust. And please believe me that every one of your patients has mentioned you to someone in their life. You need to build that same trust online. Whenever a family member or friend is diagnosed with a condition, the first place I turn to is the Internet. I look up what a Glioblastoma Multiforme is. What does a gall bladder do? What are the non-surgical options for someone with herniated discs? If you offer information on your social sites as to common diagnoses, people will find you. They will also trust you. Post something every day. You can spend some time once a week and schedule all these posts, but if your produce content, people will find you. Finally, when you do produce content, sign it. Put your name at the end. It makes social media human and that is when you get the best results.Find a Social HeroAs with any marketing efforts, it takes time and sometimes money. Find a social media hero – either in your office or externally. Residents, nursing students or office staff are all pretty good with social media. If your office staff and residents are as busy as you are, considering outsourcing this task. There are companies that can manage your social media like (shameless plug time) Boxless Media.These are a few pieces of advice. There are so many more tactics that can build your business. It is just important to realize that social media is a critical part of the marketing mix and you cannot afford to be afraid of it, or even worse, neglect it.
Via Plus91
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Solar Power Is A Huge Water Saver (World Water Day Infographic)

Solar Power Is A Huge Water Saver (World Water Day Infographic) | Science and reality | Scoop.it
Every year since 1993, the community of nations has focused on the importance of fresh water and advocated for the sustainable management of freshwater resources. Severe droughts experienced recently in places like the American West, the Horn of Africa, Russia, China, and Australia have highlighted the fact that humans are rapidly using up the world's water supplies—and when they’re gone, they’re gone. We are spending one of our most vital resources in greater volumes every day. One Block Off The Grid recently developed an infographic to illustrate how energy production depends on water. It shows water use by four of the most common energy sources: coal, nuclear, oil and gas, and solar. Solar comes out on top big time.
Via Lauren Moss, Wes Thomas
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IBM invents ’3D nanoprinter’ for microscopic objects

IBM invents ’3D nanoprinter’ for microscopic objects | Science and reality | Scoop.it
IBM scientists have invented a tiny “chisel” with a nano-sized heatable silicon tip that creates patterns and structures on a microscopic scale.The tip, similar to the kind used in atomic force microscopes, is attached to a bendable cantilever that scans the surface of the substrate material with the accuracy of one nanometer.Unlike conventional 3D printers, by applying heat and force, the nanosized tip can remove (rather than add) material based on predefined patterns, thus operating like a “nanomilling” machine with ultra-high precision.This new capability could improve the prototyping of new transistor devices, such as tunneling field effect transistors, for more energy efficient and faster electronics for anything from cloud data centers to smartphones.By the end 2014, IBM hopes to begin exploring the use of this technology for its research with graphene.“To create more energy-efficient clouds and crunch Big Data faster we need a new generation of technologies including new transistors, but before going into mass production, new techniques are needed for prototyping below 30 nanometers,” said Dr. Armin Knoll, a physicist at IBM Research – Zürich.“With our new technique, we achieve very high resolution at 10 nanometers at greatly reduced cost and complexity. In particular, by controlling the amount of material evaporated, 3D relief patterns can also be produced at the unprecedented accuracy of merely one nanometer in a vertical direction. Now it’s up to the imagination of scientists and engineers.”Other applications include nano-sized security tags to prevent the forgery of documents like currency, passports and priceless works of art, and quantum computing and communications (the nano-sized tip could be used to create high quality patterns to control and manipulate light at unprecedented precision).IBM has licensed this technology to a startup based in Switzerland called SwissLitho, which is bringing the technology to market under the name NanoFrazor. Several weeks ago the firm shipped its first NanoFrazor to McGill University’s Nanotools Microfab, where scientists and students will use the tool’s unique fabrication capabilities to experiment with ideas for designing novel nano-devices.To promote the new technology, scientists etched a microscopic National Geographic Kids magazine cover in 10 minutes onto a polymer. The resulting magazine cover is so small at 11 x 14 micrometers that 2,000 can fit on a grain of salt.Today (April 25), IBM claimed its ninth GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS title for the Smallest Magazine Cover at the USA Science & Engineering Festival in Washington, D.C. Visible through a Zeiss microscope, the cover will be on display there on April 26 and 27.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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10 Breakthrough Technologies 2014 - MIT Technology Review

10 Breakthrough Technologies 2014 - MIT Technology Review | Science and reality | Scoop.it
“10 Breakthrough Technologies 2014 MIT Technology Review Technology news is full of incremental developments, but few of them are true milestones. ...”
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Moore's Law and The FUTURE of Healthcare

Moore's Law and The FUTURE of Healthcare | Science and reality | Scoop.it
How Moore’s Law and the convergence of science and technology (INFO + BIO + NANO + NEURO) affects the future of healthcare, with market drivers & inhibitors
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quite comprehensive

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The synthetic biology future.


Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
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About synthetic biology

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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, February 25, 2014 1:18 PM

by
Sleator RD.

"Herein, I track the evolution of synthetic biology from its earliest incarnations more than 50 years ago, through the DIYbio revolution, to the next 50 years."


 http://1.usa.gov/1o3EcwH

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Bento Lab: A DNA laboratory for everybody

Bento Lab is raising funds for Bento Lab: A DNA laboratory for everybody on Kickstarter!

Bento lab is a DNA lab that you can take anywhere. Get hands-on with genetics straight away.
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Very interesting, and this is just the beginning 
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The First Person to Hack the iPhone Built a Self-Driving Car. In His Garage.

The First Person to Hack the iPhone Built a Self-Driving Car. In His Garage. | Science and reality | Scoop.it
George Hotz is taking on Google and Tesla by himself
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What he is doing is amazing!

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Plasmid Viewer - Better View Your Sequences

Plasmid Viewer - Better View Your Sequences | Science and reality | Scoop.it
The Plasmid Viewer by Genome Compiler can be freely embedded in your website in order to allow your users a new and better view of your sequences' library.
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I think it's a wonderful approach

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Solazyme and Amyris thought to 'bring stability to a risky world' - DailyFinance

Solazyme and Amyris thought to 'bring stability to a risky world' - DailyFinance | Science and reality | Scoop.it
The industrial biotech duo is utilizing synthetic biology to create renewable products with unparalleled quality, consistency, and reliability at commercial scale.
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Synthetic Biology - Inventing the Future - YouTube

The hottest new field in biotech is synthetic biology: Scientists can now re-program life at the cellular level, just like a computer program. Syn-bio expert...
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5 Reasons You Need A Social Media Strategy for Your Nonprofit

5 Reasons You Need A Social Media Strategy for Your Nonprofit | Science and reality | Scoop.it
“ Guest post by Julia Campbell There is no doubt about it – social media has changed the game in terms of how people communicate, share information and learn about new things in their lives. With 7...”
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Physicians use their smartphones for drug info |

Physicians use their smartphones for drug info | | Science and reality | Scoop.it
Eight in 10 physicians use Smartphones in their daily practice and six in 10 use tablets. Over half (55%) use both smartphones and tablets in their daily practice. The top use of smartphones is for accessing drug information while tablets are used most to access medical research. In addition, mobile apps are being used by 24% of physicians, making these the top digital/social media channel used for work purposes.
Via Dinesh Chindarkar
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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, April 25, 2014 12:00 PM

Just a few more stats...

Eularis's curator insight, May 15, 2014 4:00 AM

Laura (in our Shanghai office) says her father - who is a heart surgeon - is never without his smart phone also. http://worldofdtcmarketing.com/physicians-use-smartphones-drug-info/marketing-to-health-care-professionals/

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How Social Media is Disrupting Healthcare #hcsm

How Social Media is Disrupting Healthcare #hcsm | Science and reality | Scoop.it
90 percent of respondents from 18-24 years of age said they would trust medical information shared by others on their social media networks.The initial point of proactive research that people are now doing online was christened the Zero Moment of Truth by Google, and it’s absolutely critical in today’s marketing environment.New technology is being created every day. And consumer behavior is changing along with it. In a world where everyone has access to the same information, it’s all about positioning yourself to win a patient/customer’sattention and trust.Read at: http://www.medcrunch.net/social-media-disrupting-healthcare/
Via Parag Vora
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Pharma Companies and Social Media: A Lost Opportunity

Pharma Companies and Social Media: A Lost Opportunity | Science and reality | Scoop.it
It is no secret that social media is highly regulated in the pharmaceutical industry. With the January 2014 release of the FDA’s “Fulfilling Regulatory Requirements for Postmarketing Submissions of Interactive Promotional Media for Prescription Human and Animal Drugs and Biologics,” pharmaceutical companies are required to submit any messaging that appears in blogs, microblogs, social networking sites, online communities and live podcasts that the company “owns, finances, or influences.”The Importance of Engaging Patients through Social MediaDespite these regulatory demands, it is imperative that pharmaceutical companies utilize social media efficiently in order to actively engage consumers. Ignoring to do so would certainly be a huge opportunity missed for more reasons than one. Consumers are engaging online about everything—including their health. With 24/7 access to information, the way that consumers are thinking and behaving is changing. More patients are turning to online resources to seek feedback to questions through the use Facebook, Twitter, and other social media sites. By accepting social media, pharmaceutical companies can have a positive impact on their reputation and build corporate brand value, while simultaneously engaging with patients.Big Pharma Lags in Social Media UseA new study by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics found that only about half of the top 50 global pharmaceutical companies have some level of healthcare-related social media engagement. Of the 23 companies who do use social media in some aspect, only 10 companies used all three leading social media platforms—Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook. The overall level of engagement between pharmaceutical companies and patients has increased in the past year, however, the pharmaceutical industry still lags substantially behind other industries in terms of social media engagement.Recruit and Retain Clinical Trial ParticipantsAdditionally, only 11 percent of clinical trials utilize social media as a tool for patient recruitment. This percentage alone shows the missed opportunities to increase clinical trial awareness and improve patient recruitment and retention. As an increasing number of patients are seeking health guidance through social media, doesn’t it make sense to promote clinical trial awareness on these same channels?Interested in learning more about how your company can increase patient engagement through social media? Contact the ClinEdge marketing and patient recruitment team to see how you can increase your presence and, in turn, meet and exceed your recruitment goals.
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Cloaked DNA nanodevices evade immune system detection

Cloaked DNA nanodevices evade immune system detection | Science and reality | Scoop.it
An enveloped virus (left) coats itself with lipid as part of its life cycle. New lipid-coated DNA nanodevices (right) closely resemble those viruses and evade.Scientists at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have built the first DNA nanodevices that survive the body’s immune defenses.The results pave the way for smart DNA nanorobots that could use logic to diagnose cancer earlier and more accurately than doctors can today, target drugs to tumors, or even manufacture drugs on the spot to cripple cancer, the researchers report in the April 22 online issue of ACS Nano.“We’re mimicking virus functionality to eventually build therapeutics that specifically target cells,” said Wyss Institute Core Faculty member William Shih, Ph.D., the paper’s senior author. Shih is also an Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School and Associate Professor of Cancer Biology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.The same cloaking strategy could also be used to make artificial microscopic containers called protocells that could act as biosensors to detect pathogens in food or toxic chemicals in drinking water.DNA is well known for carrying genetic information, but Shih and other bioengineers are using it instead as a building material. To do this, they use DNA origami — a method Shih helped extend from 2D to 3D. In this method, scientists take a long strand of DNA and program it to fold into specific shapes, much as a single sheet of paper is folded to create various shapes in the traditional Japanese art.Shih’s team assembles these shapes to build DNA nanoscale devices that might one day be as complex as the molecular machinery found in cells. For example, they are developing methods to build DNA into tiny robots that sense their environment, calculate how to respond, then carry out a useful task, such as performing a chemical reaction or generating mechanical force or movement.In 2012 Wyss Institute researchers reported in Science that they had built a nanorobot that uses logic to detect a target cell, then reveals an antibody that activates a “suicide switch” in leukemia or lymphoma cells.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Very interesting
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Inductive reasoning - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Inductive reasoning - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Inductive reasoning (as opposed to deductive reasoning) is reasoning in which the premises seek to supply strong evidence for (not absolute proof of) the truth of the conclusion. While the conclusion of a deductive argument is supposed to be certain, the truth of an inductive argument is supposed to be probable, based upon the evidence given.

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Inductive reasoning and machine learning?

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How to Make a Synthetic Multicellular Computer

How to Make a Synthetic Multicellular Computer | Science and reality | Scoop.it

Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
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synthetic multicellular computer

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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, March 4, 2014 1:25 PM

by
Macia J, Sole R

"Biological systems perform computations at multiple scales and they do so in a robust way. Engineering metaphors have often been used in order to provide a rationale for modeling cellular and molecular computing networks and as the basis for their synthetic design. However, a major constraint in this mapping between electronic and wet computational circuits is the wiring problem. Although wires are identical within electronic devices, they must be different when using synthetic biology designs. Moreover, in most cases the designed molecular systems cannot be reused for other functions. A new approximation allows us to simplify the problem by using synthetic cellular consortia where the output of the computation is distributed over multiple engineered cells. By evolving circuits in silico, we can obtain the minimal sets of Boolean units required to solve the given problem at the lowest cost using cellular consortia. Our analysis reveals that the basic set of logic units is typically non-standard. Among the most common units, the so called inverted IMPLIES (N-Implies) appears to be one of the most important elements along with the NOT and AND functions. Although NOR and NAND gates are widely used in electronics, evolved circuits based on combinations of these gates are rare, thus suggesting that the strategy of combining the same basic logic gates might be inappropriate in order to easily implement synthetic computational constructs. The implications for future synthetic designs, the general view of synthetic biology as a standard engineering domain, as well as potencial drawbacks are outlined."


http://bit.ly/NseMxD