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HIV Evolves Vulnerability | The Scientist Magazine®

HIV Evolves Vulnerability | The Scientist Magazine® | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
In mutating to evade immune detection, HIV becomes susceptible to detection by different antibodies, suggesting new strategies for vaccination.
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Science and Other Wild Affairs
An eclectic mix of articles about our world and the universe we live in, with some political commentary
Curated by Pamela D Lloyd
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Global warming's record-setting pace - Phys.org

Global warming's record-setting pace - Phys.org | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
The pace of global warming over the last century has been about twice as rapid over land than over the oceans and will continue to be more dramatic going forward if emissions are not curbed. According to an analysis of 27 ...
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

"According to an analysis of 27 climate models by Carnegie's Chris Field, if we continue along the current emissions trajectory, we are likely facing the most rapid large climate change in the last 65 million years."


We cannot afford to ignore the warnings. Our current approach is that of minors who, when the canary falls from its perch, insist that canaries may die of many causes, so there's no need to leave the mine.

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Become a Citizen Scientist

Become a Citizen Scientist | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it

In Sky & Telescope's March 2014 cover story, astrophysicist Meg Schwamb surveys the expanding role of citizen science in modern astronomy. Here, she describes two cool new projects you can take part in: Space Warps and Planet Four.

Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Thanks to astronomer, David Lee Summers <http://www.zianet.com/dsummers/astronomy.html>, here are two stellar opportunities for you to participate in the exploration of our universe.

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Physicists Discover Geometry Underlying Particle Physics | Simons Foundation

Physicists Discover Geometry Underlying Particle Physics | Simons Foundation | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
Physicists have discovered a jewel-shaped geometric object that challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental constituents of nature.
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Printing the Human Body: How It Works and Where It Is Headed

Printing the Human Body: How It Works and Where It Is Headed | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it

The rise of 3D printing has introduced one of the most ground-breaking technological feats happening right now. The most exciting part, though, doesn't have anything to do with printing electronics or fancy furniture, but in producing human tissues, otherwise known as bioprinting. While it is still in its infancy, the future of bioprinting looks very bright and will eventually result in some major advances for society, whilst also saving billions for the economy this is spent on research and development.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Such astonishingly wonderful ways to use the new 3D printing technology.

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Peter Phillips's curator insight, November 27, 2013 1:55 PM

I can't see this saving money - but it will save lives. The technology to print exists. It is the question of how to develop stem cells into tissue types and then how to link these with the bodies complex control systems (nervous, circulatory and immune). in the best case scenario a grown organ will be recognised as self and the body systems will grow into them. However, organs are not toasters. Researchers are concentrating on easy things like skin grafts and ears at present, but like nano electronics, the future is full of potential and questions.

Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 27, 2013 9:27 PM

Will HP buy Organovo, which invented and produces the NovoGen bioprinter?

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Gut Microbes and Diet Interact to Affect Obesity - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Gut Microbes and Diet Interact to Affect Obesity - National Institutes of Health (NIH) | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Studies such as the one described in this article do more than provide insight into the mechanism for obesity, but also lend support for diets that include a high percentage of fruits and vegetables.

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Genomic and computational tools provide window to distant past

Genomic and computational tools provide window to distant past | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
Out of the estimated 23,000 or more genes in the human genome, about 100 of them will differ—they will be present or not—between any two individuals.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

We are truly all cousins!

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Nanoparticles loaded with bee venom kill HIV | Newsroom | Washington University in St. Louis

Nanoparticles loaded with bee venom kill HIV | Newsroom | Washington University in St. Louis | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Bee venom may be a key component in developing both preventative and treatment protocols to fight HIV and AIDS.

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Electrifying potential : UMNews : University of Minnesota

Electrifying potential : UMNews : University of Minnesota | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
Two researchers discover previously hidden talents of microbes that can live on electricity alone.

Via Neelima Sinha
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Fascinating research into the abilities of some strains of bacteria, such as "iron-reducing" bacteria, to interact directly with electricity, either donating or receiving electrons, and in the process altering the electrical state of various elements.

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Tadpoles See with Extra Eyes | The Scientist Magazine®

Tadpoles See with Extra Eyes | The Scientist Magazine® | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
Blind tadpoles regain vision when new eyes are grafted onto their tails. 
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Putting Heads Together | Science and Natural Hi...

Properly piecing together a rare early human skull (12,000 to 15,000 years old!
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

This short video provides a quick overview of how modern technology can be used to give us a better understanding of what our ancestors looked like.

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Trying to stop biological ageing (ScienceAlert)

Trying to stop biological ageing (ScienceAlert) | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
Researchers have found the link between faster ‘biological’ ageing and the development of several age-related diseases such as cancer.
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You don't 'own' your own genes: Researchers raise alarm about loss of individual 'genomic liberty' due to gene patents

You don't 'own' your own genes: Researchers raise alarm about loss of individual 'genomic liberty' due to gene patents | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it

Humans don't "own" their own genes, the cellular chemicals that define who they are and what diseases they might be at risk for. Through more than 40,000 patents on DNA molecules, companies have essentially claimed the entire human genome for profit, report two researchers who analyzed the patents on human DNA.

 

 


Via Laran
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

I can't wait until some company decides to start charging people for their possession of their own genes.

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The Most Incredible Pictures Of Every Planet In Our Solar System

The Most Incredible Pictures Of Every Planet In Our Solar System | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it

Each and every planet--and one dwarf planet--in our solar system, represented with the single best image ever take of it. Say hello to our neighbors.

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Climate Change | New Scientist

Climate Change | New Scientist | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Cold snaps and winter storms may seem more extreme, but that's only part of the picture when it comes to climate change. Make no mistake, average temperatures are going up around the world and this is causing problems for us.

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DNA of Oldest Flowering Plant Solves Darwin's Evolution Mystery

DNA of Oldest Flowering Plant Solves Darwin's Evolution Mystery | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
One of Darwin's mysteries may have been solved thanks to the sequenced genome of the Amborella plant. Scientists have discovered why flowers suddenly proliferated on Earth millions of years ago.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

We are learning so much about our world and how it has developed through the study of genomics, as indicated by researcher Brad Barbazuk's comment on the sequencing of the Amborella plant, "This work provides the first global insight as to how flowering plants are genetically different from all other plants on Earth."

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'Memories' pass between generations

'Memories' pass between generations | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it

Behaviour can be affected by events in previous generations which have been passed on through a form of genetic memory, animal studies suggest.

 

Experiments showed that a traumatic event could affect the DNA in sperm and alter the brains and behaviour of subsequent generations.

Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

We continue to learn more about how genetics works.

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Massive DNA volunteer hunt begins

Massive DNA volunteer hunt begins | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it

Scientists are looking for 100,000 volunteers prepared to have their DNA sequenced and published online for anyone to look at.

 

The UK Personal Genome Project could provide a massive free tool for scientists to further understanding of disease and human genetics.

 

Participants will get an analysis of their DNA, but so will the rest of the world, and anonymity is not guaranteed.

Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

This is a chance to participate in helping scientists better understand the genome. As one of the participants points out, "your sample could be the difference between a cure being discovered, or not." But, there are significant potential drawbacks to the plan to put the entire DNA sequences of 100,000; these drawbacks include, according to the BBC News article, "cloning without permission" and "copies of DNA being used to implicate people in a crime." Plus, when any individual makes their own DNA public, their action has implications for relatives, as well, due to their shared genetic heritage.

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New species found in Australia (Science Alert)

New species found in Australia (Science Alert) | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
An expedition to Cape York Peninsula found three previously unknown vertebrate species: a leaf-tail gecko, a skink and a boulder-dwelling frog.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Yet another example of how much there is left in the world to discover.

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Sign in to read: How to grow human spare organs inside pigs - health - 26 June 2013 - New Scientist

Sign in to read: How to grow human spare organs inside pigs - health - 26 June 2013 - New Scientist | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Yet another real-life example of the ways in which the world we live in is coming to resemble the world of fiction. As my husband put it when I told him that Japan would be allowing the creation of human-animal hybrids: "Cat Girl Nuku-Nuku!"

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6 Women Scientists Who Were Snubbed Due to Sexism

6 Women Scientists Who Were Snubbed Due to Sexism | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
These six scientists were snubbed for awards or robbed of credit for discoveries … because they were women.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Sexism continues to plague us in many areas.

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EU to ban pesticides in bee scare

EU to ban pesticides in bee scare | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
The European Commission will restrict the use of pesticides linked to bee deaths by researchers, despite a split among EU states on the issue.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Bees, unless you're a gardener, a farmer, or a bee keeper, may seem to be little more than stinging pests, but they are a crucial link in the ecosystem that supports the food crops upon which we depend, as well as many other plants. Recent far-reaching declines in bee populations have worried experts concerned with possible ecological collapses that could harm our ability to feed ourselves. With pesticides linked to the declining bee population, restrictions on these chemicals only makes sense.

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A lightning volcano... Mother Nature at her most awesome

A lightning volcano... Mother Nature at her most awesome | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
This display of natural power was captured by photographer Martin Rietze, who waits patiently for days in remote locations for the right explosive moment.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

The phenomenon of lightning in combination with volcanic activity has not yet been completely explained, although scientists suggest (not surprisingly) that it may be due to electrically charged particles in the ash.

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Obama to Unveil Initiative to Map the Human Brain

Obama to Unveil Initiative to Map the Human Brain | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
President Obama on Tuesday will announce a research initiative, starting with $100 million in 2014, to invent and refine new technologies to understand the human brain.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Every new science initiative of this scope is likely to produce amazing results. We've already seen a number of recent breakthroughs that show we're on the verge of understanding how our brains work; this project will help to ensure that the rate of progress in this field just keeps increasing.

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LilyGiraud's comment, April 4, 2013 12:03 PM
I have neuroscientific friends and colleagues directly involved in this so my hopes are high, but...

I'm skeptical. And optimistic. But this is a drop in the bucket... the NIH annual research budget is currently about $31,000,000,000 annually, so this represents a 0.3% increase on that.

The science outreach and advocacy part of me is thrilled: this is a lot of money and, with the White House supporting it, means a lot of attention will be focused on neuroscience. This is a Good Thing, because figuring out this lump of mess in our heads is pretty important but very, very hard.

To give a sense of the scale of the problem, each year more than 30,000 neuroscientists attend the annual Society for Neuroscience conference. If we assume that only two-thirds of those people actually do research, and if we assume that they only work a meager (for the sciences) 40 hours a week, that's around 40 million person-hours dedicated to figuring out the brain.

Annually.

This means that in the 10 years I've been attending that conference, more than 400 million person-hours have gone toward the pursuit of understanding the brain. Humanity built the pyramids in 30 years. The Apollo Project got us to the moon in about 8.

There's a lot of work to do and the semi-coordinated backing of public support and government should help this along.

Now the scientist part of me has some reservations, but I'm withholding judgment until I have more information. The reservations are regarding exactly what this projects' aims are, because so far the press releases and even the primary scientific document that sparked this are scientifically nebulous. But I'm hoping that the lack of clarity is simply because I'm not on the inside on this one and that the scientific team coordinating this actually has a coherent plan.

From a funding side, I fully support technology development and information sharing. It's very hard to get technical funding from scientific grants which makes the entier neuroscientific computing infrastructure totally fractured, with most labs using their own in-house tools. Information sharing will hopefully reduce the redendancy that's rampant in science due to the paucity of published null findings. Bradley Vojtek https://twitter.com/bradleyvoytek
Rescooped by Pamela D Lloyd from TheFutureIsNow
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Stanford creates biological transistors, the final step towards computers inside living cells | ExtremeTech

Stanford creates biological transistors, the final step towards computers inside living cells | ExtremeTech | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
Bioengineers at Stanford University have created the first biological transistor made from genetic materials: DNA and RNA.

Via Maurizio [ITA]
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Amazing!

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27 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts In 2012

27 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts In 2012 | Science and Other Wild Affairs | Scoop.it
We may never have our flying cars, but the future is here. From creating fully functioning artificial leaves to hacking the human brain, science made a lot of breakthroughs this year.
Pamela D Lloyd's insight:

Some amazing advances in technology are being made today. Here are a few highlights from 2012.

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