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Science and Natural History
Science & Natural History Stories, News and Films.
Curated by Jared Berent
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Putting Heads Together

Properly piecing together a rare early human skull (12,000 to 15,000 years old!) is a difficult task, but Robert Martin and JP Brown are pioneering the usage of medical technologies to give us a better picture of what Magdalenian Woman really looked like. 

 

Although previously referred to as "Magdalenian Girl," Field Museum Curator of Biological Anthropology, Dr. Robert Martin, has established that this specimen was likely an adult woman. Found in a cave in France in 1911, many myths and legends have been built around the story of Magdalenian Woman. One thing we do know for sure is that in 1926, Henry Field purchased the skeleton in New York City, packed it in his suitcase and returned to Chicago on a train. Since then the Field Museum has continued to learn new things about Magdalenian Woman, human culture and the world in which we live.

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Last Neanderthals of Southern Iberia may never have met Homo sapiens : Past Horizons Archaeology

Last Neanderthals of Southern Iberia may never have met Homo sapiens : Past Horizons Archaeology | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it

Via Susan Clark Johanson
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Molly's comment, April 22, 2013 11:54 AM
pretty cool
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A Sea Monster Named Jim

Olivier Rieppel and Jim Holstein tell the tale of the giant Lizard Eating Sovereign of the Sea (named Jim!). Touted as the T-Rex of the Sea, the Triassic sea monster…
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Jared Berent's curator insight, March 22, 2013 4:38 PM

A new species, the "T-Rex of the Sea", currently resides at the Field Museum where scientific research may lead to answers regarding ecological recovery both past and present. The potential implications related to our current biodiversity crisis are fascinating.

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Studies of evolving human societies overlook the role of animals - Phys.Org

Studies of evolving human societies overlook the role of animals - Phys.Org | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
Studies of evolving human societies overlook the role of animals Phys.Org The new paper cites a limitation of Lenski's theory: the tendency to ignore the influence of animals on the evolution of societies while focusing instead on how technology...

Via Andrea Naranjo
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Trove of Neanderthal Bones Found in Greek Cave

Trove of Neanderthal Bones Found in Greek Cave | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it

Via SIN JONES
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Pre-Viking tunic found on glacier as warming trend aids archaeology

Pre-Viking tunic found on glacier as warming trend aids archaeology | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
ReutersOSLO — A pre-Viking woolen tunic found beside a thawing glacier in south Norway shows how global warming is proving something of a boon for archaeology, scientists said on Thursday.

Via Kyle Kunkel O'Connor
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'Streets of Roman London' uncovered

'Streets of Roman London' uncovered | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
An archaeological dig in the heart of the City provides a unique insight into the first 400 years of London's Roman history, experts say.

Via David Connolly
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Nano Medicine Advance: 3D ‘Molecule Printer’ Prints Anti-Cancer Drugs from Self-Assembled DNA

Nano Medicine Advance: 3D ‘Molecule Printer’ Prints Anti-Cancer Drugs from Self-Assembled DNA | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
Bioengineering scientists from Parabon Nanolabs have developed a new drug to fight gliobalstoma — a lethal brain cancer.– using a computer aided design (CAD) program linked to a special search platform and nano-scale, 3D printer.The technology allows a designed drug to be built, and then ‘printed out”, one atom/one molecule at a time, like a ‘molecular sentence’ on paper.

Via Stuart Logan
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Crowdsourcing the dark matter of biology

Crowdsourcing the dark matter of biology | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it

Faced with the daunting prospect of profiling the complexities of the immune system, researchers at Harvard Medical School/Business School enlisted the help of the world’s largest community of software experts on the site TopCoder.  A recent paper in Nature Biotechnology indicates a cultural shift in academia with experts engaging the collective skills of those outside their community, in order to help them overcome methodological barriers to their work. (...) - by Zara Quadir, International Science grid this week (isgtw), March 20, 2013


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17 animals scientists want to bring back from extinction

17 animals scientists want to bring back from extinction | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
It's called de-extinction, the act of bringing an extinct animal back to life by reassembling its genome and injecting it into embryonic cells. After that, it's the simple matter of finding a surrogate.

Via Kathy Bosiak
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Ariana Trejo's comment, April 10, 2013 6:31 PM
I think that if all this animals could actually be brought back to life after they have been extinct for so long it would be so cool.this would allow today's generation to learn so much about evolution.
Sam Ferris's comment, April 15, 2013 7:53 PM
It'd be really cool to be able to see all those animals come back since we never got to, but bringing them back could be disasterous due to the fact that these animals haven't been around for so long and the earth has changed so much they wouldn't know what they'd be up against. There's new creatures and other things they'd have to look out for and they'd have to re-adapt to the environment.
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3D-printing synthetic tissues | KurzweilAI

3D-printing synthetic tissues | KurzweilAI | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it

Illustration of a printed droplet network A custom-built programmable 3D printer can create materials with some the properties of living tissues, Oxford


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Bioluminescence: nature lights up

Bioluminescence: nature lights up | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
A luminous fungus that illuminates the forest floor has been filmed for the first time, but why does nature put on this light show?
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Chicago's Famed Field Museum Struggles To Dig Out Of A Hole : NPR

Chicago's Famed Field Museum Struggles To Dig Out Of A Hole : NPR | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
The museum, already hard-hit by the economic crash, didn't meet projected fundraising and attendance numbers, and now must make up a $5 million budget deficit. The shortfall forced it to sell some items in its renowned collection.
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A Million Smartphones Will Drive Biggest Heart Health Study in History

A Million Smartphones Will Drive Biggest Heart Health Study in History | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) are recruiting a million participants to join a decade long heart health study. The enabling factor? Smartphones. It’s a great example of information technology bleeding into other fields and speeding their progress. If all goes to plan, the UCSF study (dubbed Health eHeart) will be the broadest such study ever completed.

 

In comparison, the much lauded Framingham Heart Study, initiated in 1948, recruited and studied 15,000 participants over three generations. The Framingham study outlined today’s familiar set of heart risks that doctors use to evaluate patients and prescribe lifestyle changes—high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, smoking, obesity, diabetes, stress, and physical inactivity.

 

The discovery and subsequent mediation of these risk factors is largely credited with a 75% decline in mortality rates due to heart-related disease in the last half century. See Dr. Hans Diehl discuss how heart disease was shown to be more of a lifestyle illness than a genetic illness by World War II and the Framingham study below:

 


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Lascaux

Lascaux | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it

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Isidore Postmes's curator insight, April 10, 2013 4:06 PM

Interesting post to visit the caves of lascaux with a stunning interactive website. A must see for people interested in culture. Its like entering the cave yourself....mystical experience !

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Giant camel fossil found in Arctic

Giant camel fossil found in Arctic | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
The fossilised remains of a giant species of camel have been unearthed in Canada's High Arctic.

Via Brent Madaris
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Brent Madaris's curator insight, March 9, 2013 9:28 AM

Camel Bones found in Canadas high arctic either means that

the original Camel Kind as created by God,

 

1. Could endure colder climates, or

2. The world was a warmer place.

 

It probably means that the original camel kind was a hardier more resilient creature than today's camel and over time, there was a degeneration of the camel kind, which led to its more isolated geopgraphy today. I am sure that natural selection (which is not evolution) had much to do with this down through the last 6000 years of history, after the camel (kind) came off the ark.

 

Brent Madaris's comment, April 11, 2013 9:58 AM
Thanks Jared. I have followed a couple of your topics.
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Modern mummification sheds light on Ramses II

Modern mummification sheds light on Ramses II | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
Photos courtesy of Andrew Nelson -  A mummified domestic cat, goes in for a CT scan at the London Health Sciences Centre.

Via Markus Milligan
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Ancient Underwater City Found Off India: Discovery in Bay of Cambay Will Force Western Archaeologists to Rewrite History

Ancient Underwater City Found Off India: Discovery in Bay of Cambay Will Force Western Archaeologists to Rewrite History | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it

Via Kyle Kunkel O'Connor
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Kyle Kunkel O'Connor's curator insight, April 9, 2013 12:49 PM

Re-writing history. 

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5 Biggest Scientific Discoveries of 2012 - Karma Jello

5 Biggest Scientific Discoveries of 2012 - Karma Jello | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
Science news in 2012 was dominated by the discovery of the Higgs boson, ending a 50-year search for the keystone in our best theory of physics. But 2012 was also marked by the arrival of the Mars Rover, quantum ...

Via MrJ
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Obama to Unveil Initiative to Map the Human Brain

Obama to Unveil Initiative to Map the Human Brain | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
President Obama on Tuesday will announce a research initiative, starting with $100 million in 2014, to invent and refine new technologies to understand the human brain.

Via Pamela D Lloyd
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Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, April 3, 2013 2:57 PM

Every new science initiative of this scope is likely to produce amazing results. We've already seen a number of recent breakthroughs that show we're on the verge of understanding how our brains work; this project will help to ensure that the rate of progress in this field just keeps increasing.

LilyGiraud's comment, April 4, 2013 12:03 PM
I have neuroscientific friends and colleagues directly involved in this so my hopes are high, but...

I'm skeptical. And optimistic. But this is a drop in the bucket... the NIH annual research budget is currently about $31,000,000,000 annually, so this represents a 0.3% increase on that.

The science outreach and advocacy part of me is thrilled: this is a lot of money and, with the White House supporting it, means a lot of attention will be focused on neuroscience. This is a Good Thing, because figuring out this lump of mess in our heads is pretty important but very, very hard.

To give a sense of the scale of the problem, each year more than 30,000 neuroscientists attend the annual Society for Neuroscience conference. If we assume that only two-thirds of those people actually do research, and if we assume that they only work a meager (for the sciences) 40 hours a week, that's around 40 million person-hours dedicated to figuring out the brain.

Annually.

This means that in the 10 years I've been attending that conference, more than 400 million person-hours have gone toward the pursuit of understanding the brain. Humanity built the pyramids in 30 years. The Apollo Project got us to the moon in about 8.

There's a lot of work to do and the semi-coordinated backing of public support and government should help this along.

Now the scientist part of me has some reservations, but I'm withholding judgment until I have more information. The reservations are regarding exactly what this projects' aims are, because so far the press releases and even the primary scientific document that sparked this are scientifically nebulous. But I'm hoping that the lack of clarity is simply because I'm not on the inside on this one and that the scientific team coordinating this actually has a coherent plan.

From a funding side, I fully support technology development and information sharing. It's very hard to get technical funding from scientific grants which makes the entier neuroscientific computing infrastructure totally fractured, with most labs using their own in-house tools. Information sharing will hopefully reduce the redendancy that's rampant in science due to the paucity of published null findings. Bradley Vojtek https://twitter.com/bradleyvoytek
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Archeologists Find Massive 14th Century Plague Graveyard

Archeologists Find Massive 14th Century Plague Graveyard | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
LONDON, March 15 (Reuters) - Archaeologists said on Friday they had found a graveyard during excavations for a rail project in London which might hold the remains of some 50,000 people killed by the "Black Death" plague more than 650 years ago.

Via Kathy Bosiak
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Rebecca bentley's comment, February 18, 2014 5:19 PM
our history can tell us about how we lived and what we did for work and our lifestyles we live.by doing testing on the bones found we can find out what caused the black plague and the symptoms of it.we can also learn the strains of the black plague there were.and we can learn how the black plague spread so quickly and what caused it to start.also were it originally came from and how it got to the usa
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The 10 Weirdest Animal Discoveries of 2012

The 10 Weirdest Animal Discoveries of 2012 | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
From turtles that pee from their mouths to bone-dissolving zombie worms, it was a strange year.

Via LilyGiraud
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VIDÉO: la "physiologie virtuelle" au service de la chirurgie

VIDÉO: la "physiologie virtuelle" au service de la chirurgie | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
Des images d'une opération chirurgicale mixées avec le modèle 3D du foie du patient, puis retransmises en direct dans le bloc opératoire: la "physiologie virtuelle" est expérimentée aujourd'hui en Europe...

Via Uston News
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Fresh twist to the DNA story signals major cancer breakthrough

Fresh twist to the DNA story signals major cancer breakthrough | Science and Natural History | Scoop.it
The DNA double helix has been an icon of science ever since it was first described by Francis Crick and James Watson in 1953.
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