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Va-t-on enfin libérer l’accès aux articles scientifiques?

Seul le quart des quelque 2 millions d’articles scientifiques publiés annuellement sont en accès libre. Et ce chiffre stagne douloureusement depuis 10 ans. Quelque chose de sérieux ferait-il obstacle ? (...) - Acfas, par Etienne Harnad, 2014

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Five recommendations for maximising the relevance of social science research for policy-making in the big data era

Five recommendations for maximising the relevance of social science research for policy-making in the big data era | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

The quantity and influence of generalisable data presents challenges and opportunities for public policy making. Helen Margetts discusses how social scientists can help policy-makers in this changed environment, ensuring that social science research remains relevant, and warns that social science concerns or questions may be increasingly ignored if ‘big data’ education and training is left completely in the hands of computer scientists. (...) - by Helen Margetts, Impact of Social Sciences, November 11th, 2013

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Link your figshare and ImpactStory accounts

Link your figshare and ImpactStory accounts | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

We’re big fans of figshare at ImpactStory: it’s one of a growing number of great ways to get research data into the open, where others can build on it.

So we’re excited today to announce figshare account integration in ImpactStory! All you have to do is paste in a figshare account URL; then, in the background, we gather your figshare datasets and report their views, downloads, tweets, and more.


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Tree of Science's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:43 PM

Digital research tools provides nice help in the workday of researchers. But a great improvement is obtained by linking tools  features  to optimize our time. figshare and ImpactStory are going in this way by linking your accounts. You have then an access to precise statistics on your figshare datasets! 

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A look at Pubmed's new commenting platform

A look at Pubmed's new commenting platform | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Pubmed is implementing a new function that enables researchers to share their thoughts about scientific publications. By allowing readers to comment and debate about specific papers publicly,  PubMed Commons is trying to extend the peer-review of manuscripts after their publication. If successful, PubMed Commons will become a platform for scientific discussions that could foster constructive criticism and eventually improve published papers and science. (...) - Connected Researchers, November 4, 2013


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Tree of Science's curator insight, April 16, 2014 2:05 PM

By implementing public comments as a post-publication peer-review, PubMed is providing to readers a way to share their comments about publications

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New Mendeley Desktop 1.10 released

New Mendeley Desktop 1.10 released | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Mendeley Desktop 1.10 has been released. Journal abbreviations, one of the most requested features has been implemented. Mendeley will now automatically abbreviate publication titles according to the rules of the style. Other great improvement is related research, it gives you instant recommendations based on specific articles and drill-down into recommendations.

 

The next release of Mendeley Desktop is here. You can update from within the app via Help → Check for Updates or download it here: http://www.mendeley.com/download-mendeley-desktop) . (...) - Mendeley Blog, 1 October, 2013


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[Biowebspin] PudAdvanced: An advanced version of Pubmed to sort out publications by citation & influence like Google Scholar

[Biowebspin] PudAdvanced: An advanced version of Pubmed to sort out publications by citation & influence like Google Scholar | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Build with the collaboration of PhD associations, Life Sciences researchers, and Key Opinion Leaders, PubAdvanced is like Pubmed (open access, same results, same look, same search) with important advanced useful features to save time and link industry & academia:
- Sort out publications from PubMed according to their influence and importance.
- Search simultaneously patents from WIPO, USPTO, EPO databases.
- Look if the publications are available for free over the Internet.
- Follow the trends of publications and patents in your field.
- Manage your bibliography, that is, export publications, patents and protocols to your EndNote.


Via Tree of Science
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Tree of Science's curator insight, September 27, 2013 10:39 AM

17000 protocols - 1500 users


PubAdvanced with CitImpact feature: sort publications according to the number of citations but also the journal that cites the article and then determined the mean of the different index as Impact Factor and Eigenfactor. (more information about CitImpact: http://www.biowebspin.com/pubadvanced/about-citimpact ;)

Gilbert C FAURE's comment, September 27, 2013 1:16 PM
thanks, will experiment and comment thereafter
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Using algorithms to link-up researchers

Using algorithms to link-up researchers | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Scientists are developing algorithms that can connect researchers across the world who have similar interests by scanning the content of academic papers. 

Researchers at TEAM, an EU-funded project, are using algorithms to quantify the extent to which scientific papers cover similar ground, and are looking at ways to profile scientists by the documents they have searched for. They are also developing technology that can facilitate searches of research papers. (...) - by Peter O'Donnell, in Horizon, 05 August 2013


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Marco Pozzi's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:59 AM

Nonostante l'idiosincrasia verso la condivisione di conoscenza in ambito scientifico forse un giorno non troppo lontano ciò sarà superato almeno in parte .... 

Enrico De Angelis's comment, September 16, 2013 7:03 AM
L'idiosincrasia verso la condivisione è un retaggio del passato. Non è facilmente rimovibile ma il modo SOCIAL di lavorare attraverso i MEDIA, ovvero i vantaggi che questo offre, lo rende sempre meno strategia praticata. Vedremo ...!!!
Enrico De Angelis's curator insight, September 16, 2013 7:05 AM

I really think that social media and other tools to research and dig out data from the network will change the Academia and Research world.

We wait for this change (and push).

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Feature Release: New image marker tool for labfolder users

Feature Release: New image marker tool for labfolder users | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

In order to use images in a scientific context, you need to make a few annotations very often: Marks and labels help to understand what´s important, be it in your notes or in your publications. In your good old paper notebook, you would just simply scribble by hand to get the message across and to highlight your findings on agarose gels, graphs, or any other data output. [...] 

We have added the most frequently used editing tools to the image annotation section. (...) - labfolder blog, by Johanna Havemann, July 29th, 2013


Via Tree of Science
Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

Instead of using Photoshop or Power Point to annotate your research images, Labfolder (a data manager) provides now some editing tools

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ScienceGist: Simplifiying science

ScienceGist: Simplifiying science | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

"Science gists are simplified summaries of scientific papers. Our goal is to bring science closer to everyone."


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Tree of Science's curator insight, August 21, 2013 11:40 AM

ScienceGist provides a way for researchers to communicate their science to broader audience by offering an easy understandable abstract of their articles.

More informatio also in the blog post: http://bit.ly/19Jm5uv

Antoine Taly's curator insight, August 28, 2013 5:42 AM

I like the idea to allow direct communication between researchers and the rest of the world

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Biotechnology: Independent streak

Biotechnology: Independent streak | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Scientists willing to take a risk are setting up individual research operations in rented lab space.

 

Ethan Perlstein was frustrated. As a non-traditional postdoc, he had spent five years running an independent lab at Princeton University in New Jersey. He wanted to continue doing what he had trained for, but a tough academic job market meant that he had no guarantees. So he decided to move to a noted biotechnology hub, California's San Francisco Bay area, to try launching his own lab without the support of an academic institution. (...) par Virginia Gewin, Nature499,509-511(2013), 24 July 2013


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A New Kind of Peer Review?

A New Kind of Peer Review? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Writing in the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, a Dr Yvo Smulders of the Netherlands makes a proposal: A two-step manuscript submission process can reduce publication bias


Smulder’s point is that scientific manuscripts should be submitted for peer review with the results and discussion omitted. The reviewers would judge the submission on the strength of the methods and the introduction alone. If they recommended publication, the authors would then send them the full paper. (...) - Neuroskeptical BlogJuly 13, 2013

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Who is who in science? Assess your colleagues quickly with RocketScientist

Who is who in science? Assess your colleagues quickly with RocketScientist | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Rocket Scientist - 

It is a convenient and easy way to asses colleagues and fellow researchers based on their citation impact (h/g-index).

RocketScientist visualizes the citation impact and research interest of a scientist based on data provided by Google Scholar.

The citation impact of a scientist is calculated using the widely applied citation metrics like Hirsch index (h-index) and g-index based on the data provided by Google Scholar.

RocketScientist is a free application that lets you browse through the search results returned by Google Scholar and view free PDF article. (by WendyTech)



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Tree of Science's curator insight, July 31, 2013 10:01 AM

You have no computer close to you and you'd like to find out how many publications a scientist in conference or colleagues have already published or what is their citation impact? With a smartphone (Android), you can have the answer in a few seconds. Rocket Scientist is an app that helps you to check the citation impact of selected scientists. After entering the name of a scientist in the search bar, the app will display the time chart that presents: the dates of publication together with the level of citations, the tag cloud of keywords, and the list of publications with links to Google Books.

 

Up to date, the app gives you fast access to interesting data and you can check it on your mobile phone but is limited to the publications of selected authors that can be found on the Internet. Nevertheless, the Rocket Scientist can be handy, not only to check the citation impact of scientists but also when looking for publications. 

 

On Google-Play: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=de.wendytech.rocketscientistng&feature

JC CAILLIEZ, PhD's curator insight, August 3, 2013 6:37 AM

A consulter sur : http://www.wendytech.de/rocket-scientist/

 

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Mozilla Science Lab: “use the open web to shape science’s future”

Mozilla Science Lab: “use the open web to shape science’s future” | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

The launch of Mozilla’s Science Lab last week is a departure from the kind of projects that the ‘open source‘ advocating organisation usually involves itself with. The initiative is designed to bridge the gap between the open web community and scientific researchers, so that they can share ideas, tools and best practices on how the web should be used to solve problems and improve research techniques.

Mozilla’s mission statement for the Science Lab puts forth the goal of increasing the adoption of the internet and related technologies within different branches of science. (...) - by Claire Bower, BMJ Blogs, 21 June, 2013


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Why open access should be a key issue for university leaders

Why open access should be a key issue for university leaders | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Universities are drowning in digital information. It's time senior leaders made openness – and its consequences – their concern.

Universities are digital machines these days. But many of the decisions that have to be made as a result are not technical at all. They are about the nature of research and its public benefits, about how learning and teaching takes place, and how we confront difficult ethical issues. Strategic choices that are made now will have significant implications for the ways in which knowledge will be created and shared in the future. (...) - by Martin Hall, The Guardian, 18 February 2014


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How scientists choose a journal to submit their work to?

How scientists choose a journal to submit their work to? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

When discussing decision factors for choosing a journal to submit a scientific paper to, it is hard to be very original. All surveys, blog entries and informal talks support one hypothesis:

Let me be honest. Although a lot of scientists are great people – who are kind to others and who really believe in big ideas and follow them in their everyday work – they also have to think about themselves, and primarily they have to take care of their careers. Otherwise, they would not be able to continue their work, which is the most valuable thing they can do (with the exception of maybe pet adoption). That is why we should not be surprised by the fact that scientists support their career opportunities and why they are above all interested in fulfilling the norms of their community when valuable science is published. (...) - Open Science, May 19, 2014

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Donner un nouveau souffle aux sciences participatives

Donner un nouveau souffle aux sciences participatives | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Mélanie Dulong de Rosnay et Marc Lipinski plaident pour qu’une « instance pluridisciplinaire » encourage les initiatives permettant à des réseaux d’amateurs éclairés de s’investir dans la recherche.

Les activités en ligne prennent constamment de l'ampleur. Au-delà des jeux et des réseaux sociaux, des millions d'individus investissent bénévolement leur temps et leurs efforts pour des tâches laborieuses et répétitives. Des jours durant, des internautes du monde entier se sont ainsi branchés sur www.tomnod.com pour explorer des fragments d'images satellite à la recherche de traces de l'avion disparu de la Malaysia Airlines. Ce phénomène social, dit du « surplus cognitif », est à la base du développement des sciences participatives. (...) - par Mélanie Dulong de Rosnay et Marc Lipinski, Le Monde, 14/04/2014
Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

Les projets de sciences participatives se développent et pas que à l'étranger mais aussi France. Portés par des chercheurs, des associations, citoyens, ils apportent des données qui font avancer la recherche. Cette #openscience (ou encore #citizenscience) ne s'adresse pas qu'aux sciences naturelles ou à l'astronomie et peuvent intervenir sur des domaines très pointus à l'instar du projet Eyewire qui sous la forme d'un jeux, les personnes peuvent aider des chercheurs du MIT à Harvard (USA) à construire une carte des connections nerveuses de la rétine. 

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Using JURN to find open access journals in arts and humanities

Using JURN to find open access journals in arts and humanities | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

If you are looking for unrestricted scientific material, for example in the form of free editions of journals, the Internet is the place to look. Open Access enjoys the full benefits of the web, and I can venture to say that without the Internet there would be no open access. The Internet however is full of junk, and it is hard to navigate through it if you do not have the know-how. Thankfully, there are numerous specialized tools and repositories that allow you to quickly and easily locate any content.


One of these tools is JURN – an Internet search engine, designed to identify scientific journals. JURN focuses on the arts and humanities, so if you are looking for materials in these fields of research, it can be very useful. (...) - by Kamil Mizera, on OpenScience, October 8, 2013


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Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

An interesting open access search-engine dedicated to humanities and arts

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Tree of Science's curator insight, October 16, 2013 11:09 AM

JURN is a unique search-engine dedicated to indexing free ‘open access’ ejournals in the arts and humanities, along with other relevant arts and scholarly publications offering free content.

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Treezilla: A Monster of a Citizen Science Project

Treezilla: A Monster of a Citizen Science Project | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Maps are everywhere these days. They have become as ubiquitous in our daily lives as they have in the science community. Citizen science projects that utilize maps are instantly familiar, easy to use, and enrich scientific data with a valuable spatial component.

Treezilla is a tree-mapping project based in Great Britain and hopes to enlist citizen scientists to map every single tree in the UK. Many of the trees in Britain’s forests have already been mapped (nearly 3.8 billion, in fact). However, the estimates of urban trees in cities, parks, and people’s yards have been poorly catalogued. These trees, although in much smaller number, still have a significant ecological value and are important to study. (...) - Scistarter blog, by Nick Forbes, September 12th, 2013


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Tree of Science's comment, September 28, 2013 9:03 AM
Treezilla is challenging #citizenscience project that is aiming to map every tree in Great Britain. This #openscience project is now accessible on the science #crowdfunding platform Scistarter
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Libre – a new way to peer-review scientific papers?

Libre – a new way to peer-review scientific papers? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

The importance and editorial requirements with regards to peer-review are commonly discussed by scientists, specifically so in the context of Open Access. The question I have been busy with recently (bothering as many journal editors as I could reach): “Does OA journal need editors and what is the role of them in whole process?” yielded a firm conclusion: Open Access journals and books need peer-review. Full stop. It doesn’t mean, however, there is a consensus on how the peer-review process should be like in the Open Access environment?  Is the current process of peer-review for  articles and books sustainable? A new project seems to be at odds with the status quo offering a truly  innovative model of the peer-review. (...) - Open Science


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Principes directeurs pour le développement et la promotion du Libre Accès (UNESCO)

Grâce au Libre accès, les chercheurs et étudiants du monde entier ont plus largement accès aux connaissances, les publications gagnent en visibilité et touchent un plus grand nombre de lecteurs, et l’impact potentiel de la recherche se trouve multiplié. (...) - par Alma Swan, UNESCO, 2013

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Open Journal Project

Open Journal Project | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Opening academic information for the benefit of humanity.

We are using the peer-reviewed Journal of Humanitarian Engineering (JHE) as a case study to pilot innovations in Open Access. 'Humanitarian engineering' describes the application of engineering and technology for the benefit of disadvantaged communities. The field is vast, including water, energy, infrastructure, disability access, and much more. The JHE aims to document this intersection of technology and community development. (...) - OJP 


Read the nice article by Danny Kingsley 'The Open Journal Project: Accessibility is more than making the paper openly available.' in "Impact of Social Science" a blog of LSE (July 17, 2013)

The Open Journal Project is a publishing initiative addressing barriers to research accessibility by looking to improve exchanges with practitioner communities. Danny Kingsley outlines the initial launch of the project, which has tackled issues ranging from multi-language access, developing country access, low-bandwidth websites, and disability-accessible content. The aim of the journal is not to be published or cited, but to provide outcomes in communities.


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New app puts idle smartphones to work for science

New app puts idle smartphones to work for science | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Android smartphone users will soon have a chance to participate in important scientific research every time they charge their phones. Using a new app created by researchers at UC Berkeley, users will be able to donate a phone’s idle computing power to crunch numbers for projects that could lead to breakthroughs ranging from novel medical therapies to the discovery of new stars. (...) - By Robert Sanders, News Berkeley, July 22, 2013


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Tree of Science's curator insight, August 7, 2013 6:27 AM

The first and most successful volunteer computing project is the UC Berkeley’s SETI research project, which analyzes radio telescope data in search of intelligent signals from space. This project was the first to ask citizen to offer their desktop computer power in order to analyse research data. It will be also adapted to the Android BOINC app

 

Lists of the first projects: 

- Einstein@Home (http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu), which searches radio telescope data for spinning stars called pulsars,

- FightAIDS@Home (http://fightaidsathome.scripps.edu), which searches for more effective AIDS therapies as part of IBM’s

- World Community Grid (http://www.worldcommunitygrid.org)

- Asteroids@home (http://asteroidsathome.net/boinc), operated by Charles University in Prague

- OProject@Home (http://oproject.info), which is dedicated to the analysis of algorithms for research projects. 

- Yoyo@home (http://www.rechenkraft.net/yoyo), which is addressing evolutionary research (simulations of different types of populations and focuses on the analysis of human mitochondrial DNA)


Follows all the new pojects automatically published on Twitter via @BOINCprojects

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Scientific Data to complement and promote public data repositories

Scientific Data to complement and promote public data repositories | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Scientific Data will be a forum for publications about datasets, but will not be a repository for primary datasets. Primary data associated with Data Descriptors will be stored in one or more external data repositories. Why this distinction?

 

This strategy helps us draw some clear lines around the goals of Scientific Data.  By ensuring that the primary datasets are stored in external systems, we make it crystal clear that our goal is to help authors publish content that promotes the scientific value and reusability of their datasets, not to control access to data. We feel that this is a progressive strategy that will help promote collaboration and data consolidation, rather than fragmentation. (...) - by Adrew Hufton, Scientific Data blog, July 23, 2013


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Tree of Science's curator insight, August 1, 2013 5:29 PM

Scientific Data is provinding further information about data storage on this platforms available next year. Indeed, their concept of direct storage has evolved to a indirect ones with a central tools: the data descriptor. Then, it will not be a dpositary structure that will provided but an evironment to seggregate publications of rich data descriptions stored in different places (journals, Dryad, figshare, and other local storage (i.e. lab and universities servers). Science Date is focus now on provinding: 

"- A publication platform for detailed methods descriptions and technical validation information

- Data search and discovery features that reach across diverse repositories

- Peer-review of data release

- The career credit that is duly associated with rigorously peer-reviewed publications"

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Is Crowdfunding The Future For Biomedical Research?

Is Crowdfunding The Future For Biomedical Research? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Microryza.com (not the catchiest of names) is a crowdfunding platform for research that raises money over the Internet from individuals who are willing to donate small amounts to fund a specific project. The average donation according to Microryza is $92.

In return for a 5 percent cut of funds raised and a 3 percent credit card processing fee, Microryza provides researchers access to a website where they can solicit money from the public to fund their research. Crowdfunding is typically an all-or-nothing deal, where donors only have to pay their pledged support if the project is fully funded within a defined period of time.

Is this the solution to the reduction in government funding of science? (...) - by Pieter Droppert, Xconomy, 7/11/2013


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Retour sur l'expérience vocabulari.se | Deuxième labo

Retour sur l'expérience vocabulari.se | Deuxième labo | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Vocabulari.se est une tentative de construire un réseau social des objets de recherche en puisant dans ces bases de connaissance que sont Mendeley et Wikipédia.

L’extension du domaine de la recherche, c’est exploiter des bases de connaissances pour construire des outils numériques innovants qui changent le travail du chercheur. 

Après plus d’un an, il est temps de revenir sur un outil que nous avons construit chez Deuxième labo, et le semi-échec qu’il constitue : vocabulari.se. (...) - Deuxième Labo, 02/06/2013

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