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myIDP: my Individual Development Plan for PhD by ScienceCareer

myIDP: my Individual Development Plan for PhD by ScienceCareer | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

You have put a lot of time and effort into pursuing your PhD degree. Now it's time to focus on how to leverage your expertise into a satisfying and productive career. An individual development plan (IDP) helps you explore career possibilities and set goals to follow the career path that fits you best.

myIDP provides:

  • Exercises to help you examine your skills, interests, and values
  • A list of 20 scientific career paths with a prediction of which ones best fit your skills and interests 
  • A tool for setting strategic goals for the coming year, with optional reminders to keep you on track 
  • Articles and resources to guide you through the process

There is no charge to use this site and we encourage you to return as often as you wish. To learn more about the value of IDPs for scientists, read the first article in our myIDP series.- ScienceCareer


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Rescooped by Julien Hering, PhD from Enseignement Supérieur et Recherche en France
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Publications scientifiques : l’open access va entrer dans la loi

Publications scientifiques : l’open access va entrer dans la loi | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Présentée au Conseil des ministres mercredi 9 décembre 2015, le projet de loi pour une République numérique doit permettre aux chercheurs de republier leurs travaux financés par le public en accès ouvert… mais n’impose aucune contrainte. Un entre-deux qui ne satisfait pas la communauté. (...) - EducPros, par Martin Clavey, 09/12/2015


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Could students solve the irreproducibility crisis?

Scientists on social media debate a call to require PhD students to replicate research before they can graduate. (...) - Nature, by Chris Woolston, 29 July 2015

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[Viewpoint] The value of archive content in academic research Research Information

[Viewpoint] The value of archive content in academic research  Research Information | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Is archive content relevant to current research and why is it still so valued in the ‘digital era’? 


‘Archive content’ can simply be defined as artefacts from the past. This content appears in many forms, such as documents, photographs and recordings, all of which represent former discoveries and offer a background to past research findings. Often a reliable source of primary research, archive content documents significant historical findings, providing a level of accountability to current research. In this digital age, why is older research still valuable in university teaching and relevant to present-day research? (...) - Research Information, by Taylor & Francis Group, 2015/06/12

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Building big data systems in academia and industry

Building big data systems in academia and industry | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Mikio Braun is a machine learning researcher who also enjoys software engineering. We first met when he co-founded a real-time analytics company called streamdrill. Since then, I’ve always had... (...) - O'Reilly Radar, by Ben Lorica, April 9, 2015

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Is pre-publication peer review obsolete ?

Is pre-publication peer review obsolete ? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

“Peer review is supposed to be the quality assurance system for science, weeding out the scientifically unreliable and reassuring readers of journals that they can trust what they are reading. In reality, however, it is ineffective, largely a lottery, anti-innovatory, slow, expensive, wasteful of scientific time, inefficient, easily abused, prone to bias, unable to detect fraud" (former British Medical Journal editor Richard Smith) and irrelevant.”


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Bernard Rentier's curator insight, August 7, 2015 2:48 AM
One of the greatest taboos in science : who will dare to say that the old anonymous pre-publication peer reviewing has simply failed to evolve in harmony with both the growth of research production and the emergence of ICT technologies ?
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What makes researchers willing to share their data?

What makes researchers willing to share their data? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

In principle, the benefits of sharing data – by which I mean the digital or analogue sources that underpin research findings – are undeniable, writes Verena Weigert, senior technology manager at Jisc.

Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

Researchers have to think more to open their research for a mutual benefits but also funders have to provide better policies to achieve this.

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Open peer review and its discontents: Criticism is an integral part of science – essential for progress and cohesion.

Open peer review and its discontents: Criticism is an integral part of science – essential for progress and cohesion. | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Discussing specific shortcomings of scientific research is no longer confined to scientific publications and discreet letters, but can be found online in blogs and across social media. This has opened up fruitful discussion, encouraging a more public form of peer review. But not all scientists are happy with public criticism. Sabine Hossenfelder argues that while not all scientific discourse should be conducted in public, the moment you make your paper publicly available, you have to accept that it can be publicly commented on. (...) - Blog of LSE 'Impact of Social Sciences', by Sabine Hossenfelder, 2015/02/03

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News Release: How to donate your body to science, without having to die: Launch of Open Humans Network

News Release: How to donate your body to science, without having to die: Launch of Open Humans Network | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Open Humans” project backed by Knight and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation invites individuals to share their most personal health information to accelerate medical breakthroughs. (...) - Open Humans, by Jason Bobe, March 24, 2015

 

 


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Tree of Science's curator insight, May 18, 2015 5:50 PM

To manage health and medicine, scientists need to handle lots of data. Scientists often have trouble recruiting enough test subjects to do powerful studies. To bridge this gap between citizen scientists and researchers conducting clinical trials an online platform called Open Humans has recently been launched thanks to $1 million in grants from nonprofit organizations. The Open Humans network is created after nearly a decade of work by researchers with the Harvard Personal Genome Project (PGP). The PGP collected DNA from thousands of people for use in studies, and made much of the data available to the public in the process. The platform aims to provide to the participants to learn their results and use their information to sign up for additional studies.

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Allégations sur les publications d'Olivier Voinnet : le CNRS met en place une commission d'enquête scientifique

[Communiqués et dossiers de presse - CNRS] Au cours de ces derniers mois, de nombreux commentaires, pour la plupart anonymes, ont été publiés sur le site internet PubPeer, rapportant des manipulations effectuées sur des figures concernant une trentaine d'articles signés ou co-signés par Olivier Voinnet, directeur de recherche au CNRS actuellement en détachement à l'Ecole polytechnique fédérale (ETH) de Zürich (Suisse). (...) 09/04/2015

 


Via Collectif PAPERA
Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

La plateforme de #postpublication #peerreviewing PubPeer fait encore parler d'elle ! Les effets de l' #openscience et de l' #openresearch : la transparence de la science. 

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Open Licenses for Science

Data, computer code and manuscripts are the produce of scientific work. It is what we make. Nowadays, people claim that all of it has to be open access or open source. But what is that all about? (...) - by Florian D. Schneider, 01 March 2015

Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

Interesting and useful article about #licencing and #openlicence in science

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L’UNESCO se joint à l’ISSN pour créer ROAD, un répertoire des ressources scientifiques et universitaires en libre accès

L’UNESCO se joint à l’ISSN pour créer ROAD, un répertoire des ressources scientifiques et universitaires en libre accès | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

L’UNESCO soutient le libre accès (OA), et en particulier l’accès à l’information scientifique (articles, actes de conférences et données de tout type) provenant de la recherche financée par les Etats. L’UNESCO travaille avec ses partenaires pour faire prendre conscience des bénéfices du libre accès aux chercheurs et à ceux qui détiennent l’information ou prennent des décisions. A travers son réseau de bureaux, d’instituts et de centres à l’échelle mondiale, l’UNESCO facilite la mise en place et l’adoption de politiques de libre accès. De plus, l’UNESCO participe au débat mondial sur le libre accès et collabore avec des initiatives locales, régionales et mondiales de défense du libre accès.


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What is the difference between 'doing Digital Humanities' and using digital tools for research?

What is the difference between 'doing Digital Humanities' and using digital tools for research? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Tara Thomson shares her experience attending a participant-driven ‘unconference’ for digital humanities students and scholars. The event format aims to be democratic, aligned with how the Digital Humanities has aimed to build itself on devolved authority. But disciplinary knowledge is not always equally shared. The discussions highlighted problems of access and exclusion as primary concerns for the field. Some felt excluded from the Digital Humanities as a discipline, but also sometimes feel excluded from their stated disciplines because of their digital work. (...) - LSE Blog 'Impact of Social Sciences, by Tara Thomson, 2015/02/11

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Antonio Facchetti: I do not make decisions on where to publish only based on the journal Impact Factor

Antonio Facchetti: I do not make decisions on where to publish only based on the journal Impact Factor | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

I am pleased to present the interview with Antonio Facchetti, Adjunct Professor of Chemistry at Northwestern University, who was named Highly Cited Scientist by Thomson Reuters in July 2014 and is the editor in chief of ‘Organic Photonics and Photovoltaics’. The journal was established by De Gruyter Open as a part of the Emerging Science Journals project. (...) - Open Science, interview of Antonio Facchetti, January 28, 2015

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Open Access at a Crossroads

Open Access at a Crossroads | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Last week marked the annual celebration/marketing event that is Open Access Week, and this year it seemed something of a mixed bag. Open access (OA) is growing into maturity, and has rapidly become integrated into the scholarly publishing landscape over the last fifteen or so years. We have now reached a point where experiments have been in place for a while and results can be analyzed. Early assumptions can now be measured and the move to OA seems to have reached something of a crossroads. (...) - the scholarly kitchen, by David Crotty, Octobre 28, 2015

 

 


Via Collectif PAPERA
Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

#openaccess at a crossroads? what do you think about this critical issue for #openscience?

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Impact, not impact factor

Impact, not impact factor | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

When the English philosopher Herbert Spencer introduced the phrase “survival of the fittest” in 1864, he could not have imagined that it would summarize the plight of young scientists years later (1). As competition for coveted faculty appointments and research funding continues to intensify, today’s researchers face relentless pressure to publish in scientific journals with high impact factors. (...) - PNAS, vol. 112 no. 26, 7875–7876,  by I.M Verma

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Data sharing shifts scientific culture

Data sharing shifts scientific culture | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it
Research data sharing: enhances chances that studies will be reproduced.

 

Over the past few years, the scientific community has expressed concerns over the reliability of scientific research, particularly biomedical research. Making the primary results of research–the actual data–more easily accessible to other scientists is seen as an important step to solve this problem. After all, reproducibility of research is at the heart of science. However, old habits die hard. And the custom of making all data fully available so that others can re-analyse and re-assess them is not yet fully ingrained in scientists’ modus operandi. Training may be required to change such habits while giving credit for people producing the original data, may also encourage data sharing and enhance reproducibility. (...) - Euroscientist, by Constanze Böttcher, 29/04/2015

Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

"Not all scientists are willing to open up their data collections..." but #openscience is an advantage for scientific research and #reproducibility

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MATIVOX's curator insight, November 1, 2015 6:50 AM

Toutes les données ne sont pas à partager, mais celles qui concernent les résultats scientifiques le sont assurément.

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Citations are not enough: Academic promotion panels must take into account a scholar's presence in popular media.

Citations are not enough: Academic promotion panels must take into account a scholar's presence in popular media. | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it
Scholars all around the world are almost solely judged upon their publications in (prestigious) peer-reviewed journals. Asit Biswas and Julian Kirchherr argue that publications in the popular media...
Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

Academic citations are not enough to evaluate the visibility of #research articles: metrics have to take in account #socialmedia and online presence

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Les NIH reconnaissent qu’il y a une crise de reproductibilité des résultats des recherches en sciences biomédicales

C’est un changement de culture scientifique auquel convie les NHI (National Health Institutes), le pendant américain des IRSC (Instituts de recherches en santé du Canada).

Que le directeur des NIH, Francis Collins, le dise haut et fort témoigne de la gravité de la situation. Il en va de la confiance dans les recherches des sciences biomédicales. Il en va des risques pour la population lorsque vient le temps de faire des essais sur l’humain. Il en va de l’intégrité en recherche. (...) - L’éveilleur, par Sonia Morin, 18/03/2015

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Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines for scientific journal

Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines for scientific journal | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Transparency, open sharing, and reproducibility are core features of science, but not always part of daily practice. Journals can increase transparency and reproducibility of research by adopting the TOP Guidelines. TOP includes eight modular standards, each with three levels of increasing stringency. Journals select which of the eight transparency standards they wish to adopt for their journal, and select a level of implementation for the selected standards. These features provide flexibility for adoption depending on disciplinary variation, but simultaneously establish community standards.


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Why Oliver Sacks was so ambivalent about becoming a bestselling author

Oliver Sacks's new memoir contemplates the pitfalls of mass media engagement.

 

To hear Oliver Sacks tell it, writing books for a mass audience was once considered one of the worst things a doctor could do.

In his new memoir On the Move, Sacks recalls the day his first book was published in 1970. Born in 1933 to two prominent doctors, Sacks happened to be staying in his family's London home at the time. (...) - vox.com, by Julia Belluz, April 30, 2015

Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

Intesting articles about why physicians or scientists have to be more open to outside academia to communicate #scicom #openscience #citizenscience

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La lente agonie du pdf : l'article du futur est bien supérieur

La lente agonie du pdf : l'article du futur est bien supérieur | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Lors de formation, je suis justement critiqué quand j'explique que le pdf ne représente plus les articles scientifiques et qu'il faut abandonner ce format pour lire un article ! Lisez un article du Guardian le 11 février 2015 intitulé "Researchers: it's time to ditch the pdf". Je cite : 'le pdf, c'est comme le tiroir de votre bureau : un... (...) - Rédaction Médicale et Scientifique, 02/03/2015

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Reddit prompts citizen scientists to go dig up dirt

Reddit prompts citizen scientists to go dig up dirt | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Soil sample collection project designed to find new drugs explodes in popularity.

 

Thousands of citizen scientists around the country are getting their hands dirty collecting soil samples after the Internet bestowed a recent burst of attention on a soil sampling project. The crowdsourced project, which aims to find new drugs by cultivating fungi from soil samples, drew only moderate interest since it began in 2010. But it caught a lucky break on social media and has now exploded, surpassing researchers' wildest dreams in just a few days. (...) - Science, by Emily Conover, 18 March 2015

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Why I have started to like Academia.edu recently

Why I have started to like Academia.edu recently | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

I have been a registered user of Academia.edu for several years now, and to be honest until recently I only used it from time to time, mostly as a place for green copies of my work. I did not see it as being a crucial part of my research workflow. Now this is slowly changing, and I am glad to say that it is a useful tool, which helps me a lot, especially in finding new, open access articles that are really interesting for me. But it seems to me that Academia.edu has the potential to do even more. (...) - Blog "Open Science", by Witold Kienc, March 18, 2015


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Tree of Science's curator insight, April 6, 2015 12:46 PM

#scientificsocialnetworks provide #networking advantages to researchers in terms of collaboration, sharing, and #openaccess. 

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Mendeley Revisited

A while ago, in a post titled Yet Another Publication List?, I ranted about the proliferation of online reference managers and speculated about their business models. A comment by William Gunn, Head of Academic Outreach for Mendeley, sheds some light on Elsevier’s strategy. (...) - NLP for Historical Texts, 2015/02/04

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Briefcase Biotec – biohacking your way to the future |

Briefcase Biotec – biohacking your way to the future | | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

When we first heard about Briefcase Biotec we didn’t know what exactly to expect. Our attention was caught by their social media presence and their determination to promote biohacktivism. After looking into it, we realized how interesting their story must be, so we emailed Alexander Murer (CEO and co-founder) and invited him to have a short chat with us. That’s how we came to learn about Briefcase Biotec, OLGA and KiloBaser as well as what all these projects have in common: independence. Let us elaborate. (...) - Sciencebite blog, by Irina Botea, February 2, 2015

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