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News about Science 2.0: scientific networks, digital & web 2.0 tools for researchers, open science, open access
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Using JURN to find open access journals in arts and humanities

Using JURN to find open access journals in arts and humanities | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

If you are looking for unrestricted scientific material, for example in the form of free editions of journals, the Internet is the place to look. Open Access enjoys the full benefits of the web, and I can venture to say that without the Internet there would be no open access. The Internet however is full of junk, and it is hard to navigate through it if you do not have the know-how. Thankfully, there are numerous specialized tools and repositories that allow you to quickly and easily locate any content.


One of these tools is JURN – an Internet search engine, designed to identify scientific journals. JURN focuses on the arts and humanities, so if you are looking for materials in these fields of research, it can be very useful. (...) - by Kamil Mizera, on OpenScience, October 8, 2013


Via Tree of Science
Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

An interesting open access search-engine dedicated to humanities and arts

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Tree of Science's curator insight, October 16, 2013 11:09 AM

JURN is a unique search-engine dedicated to indexing free ‘open access’ ejournals in the arts and humanities, along with other relevant arts and scholarly publications offering free content.

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More than a business model: crowd-sourcing and impact in the humanities

More than a business model: crowd-sourcing and impact in the humanities | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Crowd-sourcing is a somewhat loaded term, particularly when it comes to impact and public engagement.  When Jeff Howe coined it in his 2006 Wired article, The Rise of Crowdsourcing, he was drawing a conscious parallel with the concept of out-sourcing, moving essential tasks in the manufacturing and service industries from costly European and US labour markets to ones in the Far East, India etc.  And in those early days, crowd-sourcing was very much about furthering the aims of for-profit business: design competitions, distributed production, micro-tasks that anyone could perform as long as they had the time, the inclination and enthusiasm and, very likely, access to the Internet. As Daren C. Brabham called it, crowd-sourcing was ‘an online, distributed problem-solving and production model’. (...) - by Stuart Dunn, LSE blog "Impact of Social Science", March 21, 2013

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Open access and the humanities: reimagining our future

Open access and the humanities: reimagining our future | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Instead of worrying about the 'potential destruction' open access might have on the humanities, says Martin Eve, why not work towards a solution? 

When it comes to open access in the humanities, it does not feel, to many, as though they were born open or are achieving openness but, rather, that they are having openness violently thrust upon them. (...) - by Martin Eve, The Guardian, 25 March 2013

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Rescooped by Julien Hering, PhD from Science ouverte - Open science
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OAPEN-UK: An open access business model for scholarly monographs in the humanities and social sciences

OAPEN-UK: An open access business model for scholarly monographs in the humanities and social sciences | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

This paper presents the initial findings of OAPEN-UK, a UK research project gathering evidence on the social and technological impacts of an open access business model for scholarly monographs in the humanities and social sciences.


Via RepoSupportProject, Florence Piron
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