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News about Science 2.0: scientific networks, digital & web 2.0 tools for researchers, open science, open access
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Starting today, Impactstory profiles will cost $5/month. Here’s why that’s a good thing

Starting today, Impactstory profiles will cost $5/month. Here’s why that’s a good thing | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it
Starting today, Impactstory profiles cost $5 per month. Why? Because our goal has always been for Impactstory to support a second scientific revolution, transforming how academia finds, shares, understands, and rewards research impact. That’s why we’re a nonprofit, and always will be. But (news flash), that transformation is not going to happen overnight. We need …
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Altmetrics may be able to help in evaluating societal reach, but research significance must be peer reviewed.

Altmetrics may be able to help in evaluating societal reach, but research significance must be peer reviewed. | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Social media indicators of scholarly communication, or commonly referenced as altmetrics, are still far from being adopted as part of everyday research evaluation, but they already have stated value in indicating what is interesting and popular. Kim Holmberg argues these indicators have exciting potential for measuring the impact of public outreach. But further research is necessary to fully understand their value and possible applications. Where do we draw the line between promoting our own work and gaming the altmetrics? (...) - by Kim Holmberg, Blog LSE "Impact in Social Sciences", 9 july 2014

Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

Kim Holmber is discussing a very relevant point: #altmetrics  must not be considered as peer reviewing because social media indicators reveal how far research is reaching society but not how significant is the results for science. #openscience #science2dot0 

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Altmetrics: Value all research products

A new funding policy by the US National Science Foundation represents a sea-change in how researchers are evaluated, says Heather Piwowar. (...) - by Heather PiwowarNature 493, 159 (10 January 2013)

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Towards Health Sciences 2.0?

Towards Health Sciences 2.0? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

How many health science journals today make use of Web 2.0 technologies to disseminate their content? A study published this summer examines how social networks, RSS feeds and bookmarking tools are used by health sciences publishers. Open Access journals lack recognition and visibility. Hence, empowering authors, publishers and readers to actively diffuse an article has the potential to highly increase the impact of results published in Open Access. Are Open Access journals aware of this potential benefit? Should they use these tools more? How can the impact of this new dissemination approach be measured? Is a new science communication market going to appear? (...) - by Laurence Bianchini, MyScienceWork Blog, 12 november 2012


In French: Vers les sciences de la santé 2.0 ?

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Expanding altmetrics to include policy documents will boost its reputation

Expanding altmetrics to include policy documents will boost its reputation | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Altmetrics may prove to be a more flexible and versatile tool to inform research assessment, if academics get behind it.

Alternative metrics, or altmetrics as they are more commonly known, have received a lot of attention recently. Blogs, conferences and papers examine these new measures of attention surrounding published research and consider whether they are the good, the bad, or the ugly brother of bibliometrics – an indication of the number of research papers published and how often they are cited. (...) - by Juergen Wastl, The Guardian, 23 July 2014

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Altmetrics in the wild: Using social media to explore scholarly impact

[Abstract] In growing numbers, scholars are integrating social media tools like blogs, Twitter, and Mendeley into their professional communications. The online, public nature of these tools exposes and reifies scholarly processes once hidden and ephemeral. Metrics based on this activities could inform broader, faster measures of impact, complementing traditional citation metrics. This study explores the properties of these social media-based metrics or "altmetrics", sampling 24,331 articles published by the Public Library of Science. (...) by Priem J. et al., arXiv.org, 20 Mar 2012

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Altmetrics are the central way of measuring communication in the digital age but what do they miss?

Altmetrics are the central way of measuring communication in the digital age but what do they miss? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it
Inspired by the push towards altmetrics, Nick Scott sees great potential to better communicate indicators of academic success. But this does constitute impact? Here, he puts forward questions on media mentions, website page hits and the ‘dark stuff’. LSE blog "Impact of Social Science", by Nick Scott, Dec 17, 2012
Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

"The LSE Future of Impacts conference in London saw a lively debate on numerous issues. However it was the discussion on altmetrics that interested me. Altmetrics is a movement of sorts (with its own manifesto, it must be, right?). It aims to complement/replace [there seems to be quite lively discussion on which] traditional bibliographic rankings based on citation analysis of academic journals with a wider set of metrics. These include tweets on TwitterFacebook shares, saves on sharing tools like Delicious and in reference managers/research management tools like Mendeley. (...)"

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Leading universities adopt Mendeley data to accelerate research analytics by 3 years

Leading universities adopt Mendeley data to accelerate research analytics by 3 years | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

This week, leading academic institutions in North America, Europe, and Asia signed up to Mendeley’s new data dashboard, the Mendeley Institutional Edition. The dashboard analyses their research activity and impact on the global research community in real time – down from the 3-5 year time lag of the “Impact Factor”, the current gold standard for such evaluations. This allows academic institutions to react faster to their faculty’s research needs and provide them with quicker, more personalised support during the research process – thus accelerating the pace of scientific discovery for all of us. (...) - Mendeley Blog, 7 August 2012

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