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News about Science 2.0: scientific networks, digital & web 2.0 tools for researchers, open science, open access
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Expanding altmetrics to include policy documents will boost its reputation

Expanding altmetrics to include policy documents will boost its reputation | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Altmetrics may prove to be a more flexible and versatile tool to inform research assessment, if academics get behind it.

Alternative metrics, or altmetrics as they are more commonly known, have received a lot of attention recently. Blogs, conferences and papers examine these new measures of attention surrounding published research and consider whether they are the good, the bad, or the ugly brother of bibliometrics – an indication of the number of research papers published and how often they are cited. (...) - by Juergen Wastl, The Guardian, 23 July 2014

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Donner un nouveau souffle aux sciences participatives

Donner un nouveau souffle aux sciences participatives | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Mélanie Dulong de Rosnay et Marc Lipinski plaident pour qu’une « instance pluridisciplinaire » encourage les initiatives permettant à des réseaux d’amateurs éclairés de s’investir dans la recherche.

Les activités en ligne prennent constamment de l'ampleur. Au-delà des jeux et des réseaux sociaux, des millions d'individus investissent bénévolement leur temps et leurs efforts pour des tâches laborieuses et répétitives. Des jours durant, des internautes du monde entier se sont ainsi branchés sur www.tomnod.com pour explorer des fragments d'images satellite à la recherche de traces de l'avion disparu de la Malaysia Airlines. Ce phénomène social, dit du « surplus cognitif », est à la base du développement des sciences participatives. (...) - par Mélanie Dulong de Rosnay et Marc Lipinski, Le Monde, 14/04/2014
Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

Les projets de sciences participatives se développent et pas que à l'étranger mais aussi France. Portés par des chercheurs, des associations, citoyens, ils apportent des données qui font avancer la recherche. Cette #openscience (ou encore #citizenscience) ne s'adresse pas qu'aux sciences naturelles ou à l'astronomie et peuvent intervenir sur des domaines très pointus à l'instar du projet Eyewire qui sous la forme d'un jeux, les personnes peuvent aider des chercheurs du MIT à Harvard (USA) à construire une carte des connections nerveuses de la rétine. 

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Retour sur l'expérience vocabulari.se | Deuxième labo

Retour sur l'expérience vocabulari.se | Deuxième labo | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Vocabulari.se est une tentative de construire un réseau social des objets de recherche en puisant dans ces bases de connaissance que sont Mendeley et Wikipédia.

L’extension du domaine de la recherche, c’est exploiter des bases de connaissances pour construire des outils numériques innovants qui changent le travail du chercheur. 

Après plus d’un an, il est temps de revenir sur un outil que nous avons construit chez Deuxième labo, et le semi-échec qu’il constitue : vocabulari.se. (...) - Deuxième Labo, 02/06/2013

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Nature will launch an online platform for management and publication of data: Scientific Data

Nature will launch an online platform for management and publication of data: Scientific Data | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Scientific Data is a new open-access, online-only publication for descriptions of scientifically valuable datasets. It introduces a new type of content called the Data Descriptor, which will combine traditional narrative content with curated, structured descriptions of research data, including detailed methods and technical analyses supporting data quality. (...) -  


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Tree of Science's curator insight, June 29, 2013 5:08 AM

Nature Publishing Group has recently announced the launch of Scientific Data (Spring 2014 with pre-submissions this autumn). Scientific Data is an online platform for the publication of descriptions of experimental datasets in open-access dedicated to natural sciences but it will start with the life, biomedical and environmental science communities. The platform will be based on a "Data Descriptors": a combination of traditional scientific publication content (detailed descriptions of experimental and observational datasets with peer-reviewed) and structured information curated in-house in order to maximize reuse and enable searching, linking and data mining.

"Scientific Data's central mission is to help foster the sharing and re-use of the data underpinning scientific research."says Jason Wilde, Nature Publishing Group Business Development Director.

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Publons set to revolutionize peer review in physics

Publons set to revolutionize peer review in physics | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Publons is another great alternative or complement to the traditional peer review process. Like others, this service is an answer to the slow and rather opaque peer-review process, in which the fate of a manuscript is to the mercy of an anonymous pair of experts. The idea is that publishing research results should not be the limiting step. Papers should be published, then reviewed and commented-on by the readers. This sort of system would allow researchers to have a direct, rapid and interactive feedback on their work. (...) - by Thomas Crouzier, Connected researchers, April 11, 2013

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The Impact of Social Media on the Dissemination of Research: Results of an Experiment

The Impact of Social Media on the Dissemination of Research: Results of an Experiment | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

In September 2011 I returned to work after a year on maternity leave. Many things needed sorting out, not least my digital presence at my home institution, which had switched to a content management system that seamlessly linked to University College London’s open-access repository, “Discovery.” The idea was we should upload open-access versions of all our previously published research, and link to it from our home pages, to aid in dissemination. (...) - by Melissa Terras, Journal of Digital HumanitiesVol. 1, No. 3 Summer 2012

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WriteLatex connects to figshare making a complete cloud based approach to academic publishing

WriteLatex connects to figshare making a complete cloud based approach to academic publishing | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

writeLaTeX is a free service that lets you create, edit & share your scientific ideas easily online using LaTeX, a comprehensive & powerful tool for scientific writing. The site offers you an easy to use two-panel interface. The left pane is used for editing text; the preview of your text is updated in the right pane. Over the weekend, the team at Write LaTeX went live with a ‘push to figshare‘ option. (...) - Figshare

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Pathline: Connecting Designers With Scientists

Pathline: Connecting Designers With Scientists | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

We recently attended an interdisciplinary visualization workshop that was all about creating a dialogue between scientists, technologists and designers. It was interesting to discuss the different ways in which these groups think about visualization and how they use it for different purposes. Very bluntly put, each group lacks something another group knows and cares deeply about, be it an understanding of colour [we met in the UK] or an understanding of statistics. (...) - by Peter Gassner, datavisualization.ch, 18 April 2012

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ResearchGate new feature: "Find out where else you've been cited"

Our new citations feature provides you with a simple way to keep track of when and where your research is cited. Here's what to expect:

  • Be notified when your work is cited
  • See who cited you, and where
  • Add and mange your own citations
Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

The notification of new citations feature is a useful tool provided by ResearchGate

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Science 3.0: Corrections to the Science 2.0 paradigm

[Abstract] The concept of Science 2.0 was introduced almost a decade ago to describe the new generation of online-based tools for researchers allowing easier data sharing, collaboration and publishing. Although technically sound, the concept still does not work as expected. Here we provide a systematic line of arguments to modify the concept of Science 2.0, making it more consistent with the spirit and traditions of science and Internet. Our first correction to the Science 2.0 paradigm concerns the open-access publication models charging fees to the authors. As discussed elsewhere, we show that the monopoly of such publishing models increases biases and inequalities in the representation of scientific ideas based on the author's income. Our second correction concerns post-publication comments online, which are all essentially non-anonymous in the current Science 2.0 paradigm. We conclude that scientific post-publication discussions require special anonymization systems. We further analyze the reasons of the failure of the current post-publication peer-review models and suggest what needs to be changed in Science 3.0 to convert Internet into a large journal club.- by Vladimir B. Teif, arXiv.org, arXiv:1301.2522 [cs.DL]

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Repenser l’expérience de la thèse avec « Hack your PhD » | Knowtex Blog

Repenser l’expérience de la thèse avec « Hack your PhD » | Knowtex Blog | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Le 20 décembre 2012, nous avons co-organisé un apéro Science(s) et Web avec Célya venue présenter « Hack Your PhD « . Dans cette interview, elle nous en dit en plus sur la genèse et les objectifs de ce groupe. (...) - par @gayaneadourian, Knowtex Blog, 02/01/2013

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[Open Access Interviews] Curt Rice: Radically reform the communication of scientific results

[Open Access Interviews] Curt Rice: Radically reform the communication of scientific results | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it
5 December 2012 | by Abby Tabor
Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

In recent years, the open access movement has gained more and more support: SPARC, OpenAIRE, researchers, librarians, university leaders… Here, meet some of the players of open access in a series of short videos from MyScienceWork. This month, Curt Rice, Vice Rector for Research at the University of Tromsø (Norway) and head of CRIstin (Current Research Information System in Norway), explains the unique opportunities created by open access to change the communication of scientific results. (...)

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From a deluge of data, e-science tools bring knowledge

From a deluge of data, e-science tools bring knowledge | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Today, many scientific fields can be described as data-intensive disciplines, which turn raw data into information and then knowledge. If this sounds familiar it’s because this represents the late and influential computer scientist Jim Gray’s vision of the fourth research paradigm. Gray divided up the evolution of science into four periods or paradigms. One thousand years ago, science was experimental in nature, a few hundred years ago it became theoretical, a few decades ago it moved to a computational discipline, and today it’s data driven. Researchers are reliant on e-science tools to enable collaboration, federation, analysis, and exploration to address this data deluge, equal to about 1.2 zettabytes each year. If 11 ounces of coffee equaled one gigabyte, a zettabyte would be the same volume as the Great Wall of China. (...) - by Adrian Giordani, MyScienceWork blog, 27 november 2012

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Karen du Toit's curator insight, November 29, 2012 7:15 AM

"Today, many scientific fields can be described as data-intensive disciplines, which turn raw data into information and then knowledge. If this sounds familiar it’s because this represents the late and influential computer scientist Jim Gray’s vision of the fourth research paradigm. Gray divided up the evolution of science into four periods or paradigms. One thousand years ago, science was experimental in nature, a few hundred years ago it became theoretical, a few decades ago it moved to a computational discipline, and today it’s data driven. Researchers are reliant on e-science tools to enable collaboration, federation, analysis, and exploration to address this data deluge, equal to about 1.2 zettabytes each year. If 11 ounces of coffee equaled one gigabyte, a zettabyte would be the same volume as the Great Wall of China.

This article was originally published in International Science Grid This Week as “Enabling knowledge creation in data-driven science”
http://www.isgtw.org/feature/enabling-knowledge-creation-data-driven-science

[...]

 

"To answer this problem [of data deluge], some are creating infrastructures and software that are set to radically transform the way scientific publishing is done, which has been little changed for centuries.

Research publishing 2.0

While a number of scientific institutes, European Commission-funded projects, and research communities work on establishing common data policies and open-access infrastructures to make research data more searchable, shareable, and citable, the life sciences are looking at data analysis and publishing approaches that move the computer to the data rather than moving the data to the computers"

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Does the scientific journal have a future?

Does the scientific journal have a future? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

This summer, scholars will use the break from teaching to submit manuscripts, review papers and develop new ideas. But even as the major functions of scholarly publishing march on, scholars, publishers and librarians start to ask, “What does the future of the scholarly journal look like?” (...) - by Bonnie Swoger, Blog ' Information Culture', Scientific American, June 18, 2014

Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

Science 2.0, open acces archives of pre-print articles, social media measurement of impact of these article... is there a future for traditional publication pathways ? 

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Using algorithms to link-up researchers

Using algorithms to link-up researchers | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Scientists are developing algorithms that can connect researchers across the world who have similar interests by scanning the content of academic papers. 

Researchers at TEAM, an EU-funded project, are using algorithms to quantify the extent to which scientific papers cover similar ground, and are looking at ways to profile scientists by the documents they have searched for. They are also developing technology that can facilitate searches of research papers. (...) - by Peter O'Donnell, in Horizon, 05 August 2013


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Marco Pozzi's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:59 AM

Nonostante l'idiosincrasia verso la condivisione di conoscenza in ambito scientifico forse un giorno non troppo lontano ciò sarà superato almeno in parte .... 

Enrico De Angelis's comment, September 16, 2013 7:03 AM
L'idiosincrasia verso la condivisione è un retaggio del passato. Non è facilmente rimovibile ma il modo SOCIAL di lavorare attraverso i MEDIA, ovvero i vantaggi che questo offre, lo rende sempre meno strategia praticata. Vedremo ...!!!
Enrico De Angelis's curator insight, September 16, 2013 7:05 AM

I really think that social media and other tools to research and dig out data from the network will change the Academia and Research world.

We wait for this change (and push).

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Celebrating three million members

Celebrating three million members | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

[ResearchGate News, June 26, 2013]

Dear ResearchGate members,

Five years and one month after the first researcher signed up on May 28, 2008, ResearchGate has reached three million members. This means the world to me, and I want to say:

Thank you for being a part of ResearchGate!

I had the idea for ResearchGate when I was working in the lab and couldn't find an answer to a question I was struggling with. So with my friends Sören Hofmayer and Horst Fickenscher, I set out to provide you with a new infrastructure to keep you from experiencing the same isolation I experienced, and to help you find partners to collaborate with. Little did we know that ResearchGate would someday come so far, and you've led the way. (...)


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Tree of Science's curator insight, July 13, 2013 9:43 AM

ResearchGate is reaching three millions scientific members nearly five years after the launched of the scientific social network. Many new functionalities has been added since the beginning and 50 millions publications are now accessible.

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[Mendeley] Worldwide Research Collaboration Mapped Out

[Mendeley] Worldwide Research Collaboration Mapped Out | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Academia has a reputation for being a bit of a closed world, a walled garden of knowledge where secrets are jealously guarded. But the truth is that collaboration is at the very heart of research and scientific discovery, and that for science to advance, researchers need to get together, compare notes, disagree, and have their ideas challenged and built upon by others. Often this happens naturally – like in the cafeteria where PhD students will chat about their projects – but in such a hyper-specialized environment, chances are that people who share your particular research interests cannot be found in the same institution or even the same country. What then? (...) - by Alice BonasioMendeley Blog, 15 April 2013

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BishopBlog: Blogging as post-publication peer review: reasonable or unfair?

BishopBlog: Blogging as post-publication peer review: reasonable or unfair? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

In a previous blogpost, I criticised a recent paper claiming that playing action video games improved reading in dyslexics. In a series of comments below the blogpost, two of the authors, Andrea Facoetti and Simone Gori, have responded to my criticisms. I thank them for taking the trouble to spell out their views and giving readers the opportunity to see another point of view. I am, however, not persuaded by their arguments, which make two main points. First, that their study was not methodologically weak and so Current Biology was right to publish it, and second, that it is unfair, and indeed unethical, to criticise a scientific paper in a blog, rather than through the regular scientific channels. (...) - by Deevy Bishop, BishopBlog, 21 March 2013

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Les médias sociaux à l’heure des identités numériques : quels enjeux pour la recherche scientifique ?

Les médias sociaux à l’heure des identités numériques : quels enjeux pour la recherche scientifique ? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

[Audio] Le lundi 4 mars 2013, l’équipe du séminaire « les Aspects Concrets de la Thèse » invitait les sociologues Antonio Casilli et Karim Hammou à venir discuter de la place qu’occupent actuellement les médias sociaux dans le métier de chercheur, des possibilités qu’ouvrent ces nouveaux outils mais aussi des pièges qu’ils peuvent receler. La séance donna lieu à un état des lieux des pratiques, à un partage d’expérience et à une réflexion théorique sur les enjeux des médias sociaux pour la recherche. (...) - par Fabien Provost, Les Aspects concrets de la thèse, 08/04/2013

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[Video] "How to make sharing easy for researchers, will publishers become redundant?"

Dr. Victor Henning, CEO at Mendeley, presents his talk with the title "How to make Sharing easy for Researchers, will Publishers become redundant?" at the Academic Publishing in Europe (APE) 2013. See more about APE 2013 here:http://www.ape2013.eu/ [Youtube, 2013/03/10]

Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

Une intéressante de conférence de Victor Henning (CEO de Mendeley) au récent Academic Publishing in Europe (APE) 2013 à Berlin : "How to make sharing easy for researchers, will publishers become redundant?". Cela parle de #Mendeley #openaccess #science2.0

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Filipe MS Bento's curator insight, March 12, 2013 12:22 AM

Não podia vir mais a propósito da nossa discussão de hoje sobre Mendeley e Zotero...

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figshare integrates with Symplectic

figshare integrates with Symplectic | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Academics are constantly battling against their peers to climb the academic ladder. In a similar manner, institutions have to prove to Government and funding bodies that the research they fund is being put to good use at said institution. (...) - figshare blog

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By opening up a distinctive space between academic research and journalism, a thriving academic blogosphere mediates between them

By opening up a distinctive space between academic research and journalism, a thriving academic blogosphere mediates between them | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Mark Carrigan finds that academic blogging holds out the possibility of extending the role of the academic, rather than threatening its diminution. It allows for discoverability, less specialised communication, and a degree of space and freedom to extend beyond the realms of research. (...) - by Mark Carrigan, Blog LSE "Impact of Social Science", February 4, 2013

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Crowd-Sourcing Scientists Seek Gut Microbes

Crowd-Sourcing Scientists Seek Gut Microbes | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

A Bay Area citizen science project called uBiome is asking for a somewhat unusual contribution from the public: gut microbes. The samples will help scientists study how microbes affect our health. (...) - KQED, by Lauren Sommer, January 7, 2013

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Science publishing: Open access must enable open use

Science publishing: Open access must enable open use | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Those wishing to maximize the benefits of public research must require more than free access, says Cameron Neylon - they must facilitate reuse. (...) - by Cameron Neylon, Nature 492, 348–349 (20 December 2012)

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Scientists: Social Media Is Not Necessarily a Waste of Time

Scientists: Social Media Is Not Necessarily a Waste of Time | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it
When it comes to social media, there seem to be two schools of thought in the science/research community. One posits that spending time on social media can be extremely useful. The other posits that spending time on social media is stupid.
Julien Hering, PhD's insight:

When it comes to social media, there seem to be two schools of thought in the science/research community. One posits that spending time on social media can be extremely useful. The other posits that spending time on social media is stupid. The truth, in my opinion, is that it can be either.

I know scientists who have reaped significant professional benefits from their use of social media (particularly Twitter), so I know that it can be a good investment of time and effort for researchers. But before I go into that, let’s talk about why social media does not have to be a fruitless time-suck. (...) - by Matt Shipman, Communication Breakdown blog, 30 November 2012

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