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News about Science 2.0: scientific networks, digital & web 2.0 tools for researchers, open science, open access
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Social Media for Science Outreach – A Case Study: AntarcticGlaciers.org

Social Media for Science Outreach – A Case Study: AntarcticGlaciers.org | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Dr Bethan Davies is currently a post-doctoral research associate at the Centre for Glaciology, Aberystwyth University in Wales, UK. She is also currently a SCAR (Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research) Visiting Fellow at to the Antarctic Research Centre, Victoria University of Wellington, in New Zealand. Bethan researches the response of glaciers and ice caps in the Antarctic Peninsula to climate change at a variety of timescales. She reconstructs the extent of former glaciers by analysing their ancient geomorphological imprint on the landscape, and combines this with studies of more recent change, observed from satellite images over the last 40 years. Bethan also uses computer mathematical ice sheet models to attempt to understand the climatic driving forces behind the glacier fluctuations that she has observed. Bethan started blogging about her fieldwork and research in July 2012 on the website “AntarcticGlaciers.org”, as part of an on-going commitment to outreach and education. (...) - by SpotOn Editor on 22 May, 2013


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Tree of Science's curator insight, June 26, 2013 12:41 PM
Researchers decide to disseminate the results of peer-reviewed scientific literature to the general public 
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Les médias sociaux à l’heure des identités numériques : quels enjeux pour la recherche scientifique ?

Les médias sociaux à l’heure des identités numériques : quels enjeux pour la recherche scientifique ? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

[Audio] Le lundi 4 mars 2013, l’équipe du séminaire « les Aspects Concrets de la Thèse » invitait les sociologues Antonio Casilli et Karim Hammou à venir discuter de la place qu’occupent actuellement les médias sociaux dans le métier de chercheur, des possibilités qu’ouvrent ces nouveaux outils mais aussi des pièges qu’ils peuvent receler. La séance donna lieu à un état des lieux des pratiques, à un partage d’expérience et à une réflexion théorique sur les enjeux des médias sociaux pour la recherche. (...) - par Fabien Provost, Les Aspects concrets de la thèse, 08/04/2013

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Altmetrics in the wild: Using social media to explore scholarly impact

[Abstract] In growing numbers, scholars are integrating social media tools like blogs, Twitter, and Mendeley into their professional communications. The online, public nature of these tools exposes and reifies scholarly processes once hidden and ephemeral. Metrics based on this activities could inform broader, faster measures of impact, complementing traditional citation metrics. This study explores the properties of these social media-based metrics or "altmetrics", sampling 24,331 articles published by the Public Library of Science. (...) by Priem J. et al., arXiv.org, 20 Mar 2012

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Scientists: Social Media Is Not Necessarily a Waste of Time

Scientists: Social Media Is Not Necessarily a Waste of Time | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it
When it comes to social media, there seem to be two schools of thought in the science/research community. One posits that spending time on social media can be extremely useful. The other posits that spending time on social media is stupid.
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When it comes to social media, there seem to be two schools of thought in the science/research community. One posits that spending time on social media can be extremely useful. The other posits that spending time on social media is stupid. The truth, in my opinion, is that it can be either.

I know scientists who have reaped significant professional benefits from their use of social media (particularly Twitter), so I know that it can be a good investment of time and effort for researchers. But before I go into that, let’s talk about why social media does not have to be a fruitless time-suck. (...) - by Matt Shipman, Communication Breakdown blog, 30 November 2012

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BishopBlog: Blogging as post-publication peer review: reasonable or unfair?

BishopBlog: Blogging as post-publication peer review: reasonable or unfair? | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

In a previous blogpost, I criticised a recent paper claiming that playing action video games improved reading in dyslexics. In a series of comments below the blogpost, two of the authors, Andrea Facoetti and Simone Gori, have responded to my criticisms. I thank them for taking the trouble to spell out their views and giving readers the opportunity to see another point of view. I am, however, not persuaded by their arguments, which make two main points. First, that their study was not methodologically weak and so Current Biology was right to publish it, and second, that it is unfair, and indeed unethical, to criticise a scientific paper in a blog, rather than through the regular scientific channels. (...) - by Deevy Bishop, BishopBlog, 21 March 2013

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Blog de science et doctorat - Un atout pour votre carrière scientifique

Jeudi 14 mars, une vingtaine de doctorants et jeunes docteurs de l’université de Nanterre se sont rendus à leur formation doctorale malgré la neige. La plupart sont en doctorat de lettres ou de sciences humaines et sociales. Tous étaient là pour entendre parler de blogs scientifiques, de networking et de réseaux sociaux. Quel intérêt quand on est en thèse ? (...) - MyScienceNews, par Laurence Bianchini, 05/04/2013

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By opening up a distinctive space between academic research and journalism, a thriving academic blogosphere mediates between them

By opening up a distinctive space between academic research and journalism, a thriving academic blogosphere mediates between them | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Mark Carrigan finds that academic blogging holds out the possibility of extending the role of the academic, rather than threatening its diminution. It allows for discoverability, less specialised communication, and a degree of space and freedom to extend beyond the realms of research. (...) - by Mark Carrigan, Blog LSE "Impact of Social Science", February 4, 2013

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