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4 ways open access enhances academic freedom

4 ways open access enhances academic freedom | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Are politicians stealing our academic freedom? Is their fetish with open access publishing leading to a "pay to say" system for the rich?

Will the trendy goal of making publicly financed research freely available skew the world of scholarship even more in the direction of the natural sciences?

I don’t think so. But it took me a while to get there. (...) - by Curt Rice, Blog "Thourghts on university leadership", March 27, 2013

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Filipe MS Bento's curator insight, April 5, 2013 3:36 AM

Rather relevant thoughts about Open access policies, namely the trending Gold route of Open Access publishing, the related Open Data movement, that is here to stay, and four examples how open access publishing may enhance academic freedom.

 

For a concise analysis of the different ways of Open Access publishing/archiving, please do have a look at SHERPA’s brief guide: http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/documents/sherpaplusdocs/Nottingham-colour-guide.pdf

Filipe MS Bento's curator insight, April 5, 2013 3:40 AM

Rather relevant and concise thoughts/analysis about Open access policies, namely the trending Gold route of Open Access publishing, the related Open Data movement that is to stay, and four examples how open access publishing may enhance academic freedom.

 

For a concise analysis of the different ways of Open Access publishing/archiving have a look at SHERPA’s brief guide: http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/documents/sherpaplusdocs/Nottingham-colour-guide.pdf

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Researchers opt to limit uses of open-access publications

Researchers opt to limit uses of open-access publications | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Advocates of open publishing fret that misunderstandings lead scientists to choose restrictive licenses.


Academics are — slowly — adopting the view that publicly funded research should be made freely available. But data released yesterday suggest that, given the choice, even researchers who publish in open-access journals want to place restrictions on how their papers can be re-used for example, sold by others for commercial profit. (...) - by Richard Van Noorden, Nature06 February 2013

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Open access could prevent rejection of good science

Open access could prevent rejection of good science | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

[interview] Steve Miron, senior vice president of Wiley's Scientific, Technical, Medical and Scholarly business reveals why he is excited about the potential of open access (...) - Research Information, Interview by Siân Harris, Dec 2012/ jan 2013

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Social media tips for scientists

Social media tips for scientists | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it
For many scientists, the thought of spending time on social media sites is distinctly unappealing. To some it’s just a question of time: why add to that to-do list which is already long enough? For others it’s more to do with social media itself, finding the idea of sharing thoughts and ideas with the whole world pointless or self-indulgent.


If that sounds like you, it might be time to reconsider your options – social media includes much more than the usual suspects like Facebook and Twitter, and there are even sites dedicated to academics. Indeed, a vast number of scientists are using social media for tremendous gains – whether that be forming new contacts and collaborations, sharing ideas, communicating science, inspiring others or just entertaining them. Why not join them? (...) - by Catherine de Lange, Naturejobs, 28 Sep 2012

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Open Access: HEFCE, REF2020 and the Threat to Academic Freedom

Open Access: HEFCE, REF2020 and the Threat to Academic Freedom | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Summary

  • The Government is pushing academic publishing to a ‘pay-to-say’ model in order to achieve open access to publicly funded research
  • This ‘gold’ route to open access, which levies Article Processing Charges (as proposed in the Finch Report and taken up by RCUK and HEFCE) poses a major problem for academics in the UK:
    • It threatens academic freedom through pressures on institutions to distribute scarce APC resources and to judge work by standards other than peer review
    • It threatens research funding by diverting existing funds into paying for publications (and private journal profits) rather than into research
    • It increases academic inequality both across and within institutions, by linking prestige in research and publishing to the capacity to pay APCs, rather than to academic qualities
    • It threatens academic control of research outputs by allowing for commercial uses without author consent
  • In response, academics should:
    • Practice and lobby for ‘green’ open access of all post-peer reviewed work within journals and institutions
    • Lobby against proposed restrictions on REF2020 and against compliance pressure for ‘gold’ open access
    • Demand clear policies from Universities around open access funds
    • Ensure institutional resources are not unnecessarily spent on APCs
    • Protect the integrity of scholarly journals by rejecting the pressure for ‘pay-to-say’ publishing

Blog The Disorder of Things, 4 December 2013,  

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By opening up a distinctive space between academic research and journalism, a thriving academic blogosphere mediates between them

By opening up a distinctive space between academic research and journalism, a thriving academic blogosphere mediates between them | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Mark Carrigan finds that academic blogging holds out the possibility of extending the role of the academic, rather than threatening its diminution. It allows for discoverability, less specialised communication, and a degree of space and freedom to extend beyond the realms of research. (...) - by Mark Carrigan, Blog LSE "Impact of Social Science", February 4, 2013

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We can do much better than rely on the self-fulfilling impact factor: Academics must harness ideas of engagement to illustrate their impact

We can do much better than rely on the self-fulfilling impact factor: Academics must harness ideas of engagement to illustrate their impact | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

Impact Factors are a god-send for overworked and distracted individuals, and while Google Scholar goes some way to utilizing multiple measures to determine a researcher’s impact, Jonathan Becker argues that we can go one better. He writes that engagement is the next metric that academics must conquer.

Those of you in the professoriate are likely in the same position as me, where tenure and/or promotion are tied to scholarly output, which is largely judged by the impact factors of the journals in which we have published. That is, we largely judge each other’s scholarship based on impact factor. (...) - by Jonathan Becker, LSE: blog Impact of Social Sciences, Oct 9, 2012

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Live-tweeting at academic conferences: 10 rules of thumb

Live-tweeting at academic conferences: 10 rules of thumb | Science 2.0 news | Scoop.it

After 'Twittergate', Ernesto Priego explores the ethics of live-tweeting academic events and provides 10 points to bear in mind when navigating this emerging social media minefield. (...) - by Ernesto PriegoThe Guardian, Wednesday 3 October 2012

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