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A study of island birds reveals that biodiversity is everywhere

A study of island birds reveals that biodiversity is everywhere | Science | Scoop.it
Charles Darwin was famously inspired by the differing beak shapes and lengths of Galápagos finches – so inspired he eventually thought up the idea of evoluti

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Whale Song - YouTube

https://soundcloud.com/iwhales Established in 1988, the Oceania Project is an independent, non-profit research organisation dedicated to the conservation and...

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Do “Mirror Neurons” Help Create Social Understanding?

Do “Mirror Neurons” Help Create Social Understanding? | Science | Scoop.it

Is the mirror system key to how social understanding is created in the brain?

 

Researchers from Denmark released a new study on Feb. 24 showing that specific brain cells called “mirror neurons” may help people interpret the actions they see other people perform.

 

========================

Mirror neurons are thought to be

specialized brain cells that allow

you to learn and empathize by

observing the actions

of another person.

========

 

The new study from Aarhus University and the University of Copenhagen will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science. The research was led by postdoctoral research fellow John Michael.

 

by Christopher Bergland


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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 25, 2014 9:45 AM

It would make intuitive sense.  If you cannot somehow connect to the other, how can you have a relationship, let alone, a positive one where there is understanding?

 

Could be an interesting technique to boost empathy and relate to people from other cultures and backgrounds.  If these neurons can be built up or analyzed in real time, it might be a valuable tool for briding gaps between people from different cultural backgrounds (or, at least, weeding out those who really shouldn't be interacting with people from different backgrounds in the first place).

 

I wonder if rats and other non-primate social animals have these mirror neurons as well.

 

I think it's good to focus on confirming these results and to determine whether mirror neurons are distinctly a neuron class onto their own or are simply neurons that fulfil multiple roles.  This last question, especially, would answer a lot of questions about how the brain works in one fell swoop, showing whether or not there are specific types of neurons in the brain, or whether each neuron can fulfil multiple roles, even in this highly specialized form.

 

 

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On the other side of Australia, a marine wonder to rival the Great Barrier Reef

On the other side of Australia, a marine wonder to rival the Great Barrier Reef | Science | Scoop.it
In the third in a series of special reports on the nation’s most extraordinary marine environments, Guardian Australia’s ocean correspondent visits the proposed Great Kimberley marine park, and its amazing jewel in the crown: Horizontal Falls...

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Whale Song - YouTube

https://soundcloud.com/iwhales Established in 1988, the Oceania Project is an independent, non-profit research organisation dedicated to the conservation and...

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