SciEd: Science education in the elementary and middle grades
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4 Tips for Surviving the Last Half of the School Year -- THE Journal

4 Tips for Surviving the Last Half of the School Year -- THE Journal | SciEd: Science education in the elementary and middle grades | Scoop.it
The best way to keep engaged in your teaching and to enjoy your job is to be prepared.
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New Snail Species with Transparent Shell Discovered in Cave in Croatia

New Snail Species with Transparent Shell Discovered in Cave in Croatia | SciEd: Science education in the elementary and middle grades | Scoop.it

Dr. Alexander Weigand of the Goethe-University Frankfurt has described a new species of cave-dwelling snail from the Lukina Jama–Trojama cave system.

 

The new species, named Zospeum tholussum, is a tiny and fragile snail with a beautifully shaped dome-like semi-transparent shell. Dr. Weigand found only one living specimen of Zospeum tholussum in an unnamed large chamber at the remarkable depth of 980 m.

 

“The single living specimen was found in an unnamed large chamber with lots of stones, rocks and sand. A temporal small stream of running water was present close to the collecting site. Air temperature was between 3.3 – 3.5 degrees Celsius, water temperature 5.1 degrees Celsius and air humidity 100 per cent. Shells were observed beginning from 800 m depth till the bottom of the cave. Shells were generally found on layers of mud,” Dr. Weigand wrote in a paper published in the open-access journalSubterranean Biology.

 

All known species from the cave-dwelling genus Zospeum possess a limited ability to move. Their preference of a muddy habitat and the fact that they are usually located near the drainage system of the cave, in a close proximity to running water, however suggest that these animals are not exactly immobile. Scientists hypothesize that dispersal is achieved through passive transportation via water or larger mammals.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Connor Keesee's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:21 PM

Connor Keesee Nelson Gold 4 

New Species Discovered

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Orangutans may share an underlying conceptual process with humans

Orangutans may share an underlying conceptual process with humans | SciEd: Science education in the elementary and middle grades | Scoop.it
The ability to form a general concept that connects what we know about the members of a category allows humans to respond appropriately when they encounter a novel member of that category.
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Phenomenology and Constructivism

A six-part conversation between Jonathan Raskin and Brent Dean Robbins on the similarities and distinctions between phenomenology and constructivism.
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Camouflaged Octopus Uses Thousands Of Tiny Chromatophores and Reflectors To Match Surroundings

Camouflaged Octopus Uses Thousands Of Tiny Chromatophores and Reflectors To Match Surroundings | SciEd: Science education in the elementary and middle grades | Scoop.it
Roger Hanlon was following this octopus underwater and couldn't believe his eyes.

 

The ghost octopus can match the color and texture of its surroundings in fractions of a second by changing the size and shape of dynamic spots of pigments on their skin called chromatophores.

Chromatophores allow an octopus to blend in with all manner of underwater backdrops.

 

Some combination of these expandable chromatophores and reflectors underneath them allows an octopus to blend in with vegetation, rocks, or smooth surfaces almost imperceptibly. Hanlon has been studying these animals for years, and is still in awe of their camouflaging stunts. “The amazing thing is that these animals are color blind yet they are capable of creating color-match patterns,” Hanlon told Science Friday, “But we don’t know how.”

 

So, when science can’t tell us how something works, all we can do is be amazed. Watch the video again and revel in how awesome this tricky octopus is. It won’t get any more obvious, we promise. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Mad Scientist's curator insight, September 17, 2013 12:25 AM

This video shows the amazing the camoflague ability of the octopus. Squid and Cuttlefish (relatives of octopus) are also really good at this. What is even more amazing is that these animals are colour-blind and that their skin cells do all the work.

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Piaget's Constructivism | Language Fix

Piaget's Constructivism | Language Fix | SciEd: Science education in the elementary and middle grades | Scoop.it
As a pioneering psychologist in the merging studies of cognition and learning, Jean Piaget helped change the common assumption that as thinkers, children are merely less complex versions of adults. His twentieth century ...
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14 Social Media Tools Used by Marketing Pros | Social Media ...

14 Social Media Tools Used by Marketing Pros | Social Media ... | SciEd: Science education in the elementary and middle grades | Scoop.it
Social Media Tools: Discover the tools social media pros are using today and get more out of your social media marketing.
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Tools for Creating Creating Screen Capture Images and Videos

Tools for Creating Creating Screen Capture Images and Videos | SciEd: Science education in the elementary and middle grades | Scoop.it
This evening I received a question from a reader who was wondering what I use to create the annotated screen capture images that you see in the guides that I produce. I create those images by using Jing which I have ...
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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | SciEd: Science education in the elementary and middle grades | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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Frog pops up in NASA photo of LADEE rocket launch: Did it croak?  - NBC News.com

Frog pops up in NASA photo of LADEE rocket launch: Did it croak?  - NBC News.com | SciEd: Science education in the elementary and middle grades | Scoop.it
Oh my! We’re not sure to laugh or cry on this one (maybe both). This frog gives new meaning to “flying leap” (or giant leap). This...
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Guinness record: World's thinnest glass is just two atoms thick

Guinness record: World's thinnest glass is just two atoms thick | SciEd: Science education in the elementary and middle grades | Scoop.it

At just a molecule thick, it's a new record: The world's thinnest sheet of glass, a serendipitous discovery by scientists at Cornell and Germany's University of Ulm, is recorded for posterity in the Guinness Book of World Records.

 

The "pane" of glass, so impossibly thin that its individual silicon and oxygen atoms are clearly visible via electron microscopy, was identified in the lab of David A. Muller, professor of applied and engineering physics and director of the Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science.

 

The work that describes direct imaging of this thin glass was first published in January 2012 in Nano Letters, and the Guinness records officials took note. The record will now be published in the Guinness World Records 2014 Edition.

 

Just two atoms in thickness, the glass was an accidental discovery, Muller said. The scientists had been making graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms in a chicken wire crystal formation, on copper foils in a quartz furnace. They noticed some "muck" on the graphene, and upon further inspection, found it to be composed of the elements of everyday glass, silicon and oxygen.

 

They concluded that an air leak had caused the copper to react with the quartz, also made of silicon and oxygen. This produced the glass layer on the would-be pure graphene.

 

Besides its sheer novelty, Muller said, the work answers an 80-year-old question about the fundamental structure of glass. Scientists, with no way to directly see it, had struggled to understand it: it behaves like a solid, but was thought to look more like a liquid. Now, the Cornell scientists have produced a picture of individual atoms of glass, and they found that it strikingly resembles a diagram drawn in 1932 by W.H. Zachariasen – a longstanding theoretical representation of the arrangement of atoms in glass.

 

"This is the work that, when I look back at my career, I will be most proud of," Muller said. "It's the first time that anyone has been able to see the arrangement of atoms in a glass."

 

What's more, two-dimensional glass could someday find a use in transistors, by providing a defect-free, ultra-thin material that could improve the performance of processors in computers and smartphones.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Robert Keyse's curator insight, October 23, 2013 8:43 AM

Wonderful story this..