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The Autism Paradox

The Autism Paradox | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

A friend recently shared this with me.  Makes me think we need to think of more ways to capitalize on our kids strengths and when they are older make sure we match a job they are passionate about and also one that will build on their gifts.

Here's to others seeing ALL kids as competent!

 

The Autism Paradox


1. It's easy to recite an entire book but difficult to make up a story.


2. It's easy to line up toys but difficult to stay in line.


3. It makes perfect sense to climb on the sofa but little sense to sit on it.


4. Memorizing the Presidents in order - 10 minutes. Packing a school bag - 10 hours.


5. Family pictures on the wall are boring but that speck of dust next to it, now that's fascinating!


6. Talking about weather patterns - a piece of cake. Talking about my day - impossible.


7. Ability to focus on spinning objects - timeless. Ability to focus on homework - 3 seconds.


8. Being called by name - can't hear it. Some owl hooting in the distance - clear as a bell.


9. How to operate the remote control - zero instruction. How to button up pants - intensive instruction.


10. Navigating social rules - poorly skilled. Navigating from the back seat of the car - highly skilled.

 

 

                                       – Charmaine

 


Via Charmaine Thaner, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Emotions Round The World

Emotions Round The World | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Gallup measures daily emotions in more than 150 countries and areas by asking residents whether they experienced five positive and five negative emotions a lot the previous day. Negative experiences include anger, stress, sadness, physical pain, and worry. Positive emotions include feeling well-rested, being treated with respect, enjoyment, smiling and laughing a lot, and learning or doing something interesting.

 

To measure the presence or absence of emotions, Gallup averaged together the percentage of residents in each country who said they experienced each of the 10 positive and negative emotions.

 

Negative emotions are highest in the Middle East and North Africa, with Iraq, Bahrain, and the Palestinian Territories leading the world in negative daily experiences. Latin America leads the world when it comes to positive emotions, with Panama, Paraguay, and Venezuela at the top of that list.


Via Les Howard, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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ADHD & Meds: The Conundrum Continues

ADHD & Meds: The Conundrum Continues | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

 

.."Critics have long feared that stimulants simply drug children into submission, turning youngsters into compliant robots with no will to engage in defiant behavior.But few studies have documented the effect of the drugs from the perspective of the children taking them.

So that’s what Ilina Singh of King’s College London and her colleagues did.

 

In the Voices on Identity, Childhood, Ethics and Stimulants (VOICES) study, they interviewed 151 American and British children aged 9 to 14 who were taking medication for ADHD between 2008 and 2010. Their conclusion? “On balance, children report that stimulant drugs improve their capacity for moral agency,” Singh writes, explaining that most felt the drugs allowed them to make better choices. As an American 11-year-old girl told the researchers, “With medication, it’s not that you’re a different person; you’re still the same person, but you just act a little better. Medication will help you control yourself.”

A ten-year-old American boy put it this way: “Medication slows my brain down and makes good ideas stay longer.” Another 10-year-old boy described his ADHD as a “blocker” that prevented him from going the right way. “[The medicine] opens the blocker so you can go [the right] way. But you still have the choice of going the wrong way,” he said.

 

.....The series of studies continue to add to our knowledge about ADHD, and how best to treat symptoms to help students reach their full potential, both academically and socially. But they also highlight the complexity of the condition and the role of environmental factors, not just biology. For those who definitely have the disorder and who do not have intolerable side effects from medication, the results are increasingly clear: stimulant medications don’t turn kids into zombies, but they may prevent crime— and not by suppressing choice, but by allowing freedom from destructive impulses. These drugs are far from a cure-all, but they are also not mere pacifiers..."

 

Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2012/11/26/adhd-medications-improve-decision-making-but-are-they-being-used-properly/#ixzz2DjNep95N


Via Lou Salza, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Digital Storytelling: how to make an animated PPT movie

How-to video for creating digital storybooks using custom animations in PowerPoint. For more resources from Nancye Blair, visit www.EngagingEducation.net.


Via Baiba Svenca, Eva Buyuksimkesyan, EiriniKaragiorgaki, Let's Learn IT, Juergen Wagner, Louise Robinson-Lay
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Allison Kenney's curator insight, October 16, 2014 8:46 AM

Not the same old PPT that we used to use.

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, October 20, 2014 3:24 AM

Je suis de plus en plus convaincu qu'il faut raconter des histoires, même à des 'grands'.

Winnie Bob's curator insight, May 14, 10:18 PM
Love this. Would be great for the narrative for assessment.
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A Collection of Free Presentation Templates

A Collection of Free Presentation Templates | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Check out the free, professionally designed presentation templates listed below. They're easy to use and will help you quickly create a great presentation.


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Stacey Py Flynn's comment, December 2, 2012 8:41 AM
These are great!
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Top 29 Best Ways to Stay Creative in Life Inspirational | All Infographics

Top 29 Best Ways to Stay Creative in Life Inspirational | All Infographics | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Infographics on being creative in life and inspiration with top 29 ways to be creative on success and startup exploring and researching ideas and concept...


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, João Greno Brogueira, Louise Robinson-Lay
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Elisa Vivancos's comment, December 22, 2012 3:46 AM
http://allinfographics.org/top-29-best-ways-to-stay-creative-in-life-inspirational
Kathy Jordan's curator insight, February 10, 2013 11:27 AM

I need motivation to stay creative and this infographic by @all_infographic is a winner.

Ana Gea's curator insight, March 19, 2013 9:03 PM

Most importantly- Have fun & Finish something. 

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Finnish Lessons: Structure of the Education System in Finland since 1970

Finnish Lessons: Structure of the Education System in Finland since 1970 | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Finnish Lessons is a new book for me.  Howard Gardner recommended it for anyone looking to find answers to the problems the education system in the US seems to be facing.  

 

In Finland, their dropout rate is quite low.  Over 90% of their students graduate from secondary school.  The author of this book believes part of that equation is the notion that they begin career guidance and counseling early.  It is a cornerstone of their system.  Additionally, students can choose (yes, I said CHOOSE) vocational upper secondary at age 16 or general uppersecondary.  Both choices allow them to choose work, vocational college or university at age 18.  This plan also affords them time in various work place settings before decisions are made.

 

I've often heard educators speak of the college "tract",  that is currently the only REAL option in the US,  as if it were the panacea for everyone.    "We certainly wouldn't want to have "lower" expectations for any student now, would we?"  The lower expectations notion has to do with vocational options.  The inference is that every kid needs to have courses that kids going to the university need to have, including Algebra II and lots of foreign language , science, etc.  Allowing them to go the vocational route is "lowering" our expectations.  That idea is very much biased and hurtful to many.  

 

I believe that the LACK of options happens to be part of the reason our graduation rates are so dismal!  Let the students leave HS experts in an area that might feed them later.  Additionally, use ALL content to teach creativity, thinking, problem solving.  Keep them engaged in areas they excel.  

 

Sigh.......I know too many bright woodworkers, electricians, builders, mechanics who were beat by a system that expected them to be someone they weren't.  : (

 

 


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Antipoverty Programs Having Big Impact, New Government Poverty Measure Shows

Antipoverty Programs Having Big Impact, New Government Poverty Measure Shows | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
The Census Bureau today released data showing that SNAP (food stamps), the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), and unemployment insurance kept millions of Americans out of poverty in 2011, using a new poverty measure that counts taxes and non-cash...

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Fresno Schools Look to Oakland for Restorative Justice Model - New America Media

Fresno Schools Look to Oakland for Restorative Justice Model - New America Media | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
#Fresno Schools Look to #Oakland for Restorative Justice Model http://t.co/ggc0u12G RT @NewAmericaMedia...

 

Restorative justice is a model worth looking into.  

 

 

Three principles form the foundation for restorative justice:

 

http://www.restorativejustice.org/university-classroom/01introduction/


Justice requires that we work to restore those who have been injured.
Those most directly involved and affected by crime should have the opportunity to participate fully in the response if they wish.
Government's role is to preserve a just public order, and the community's is to build and maintain a just peace.


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This is Why We Forget Things

This is Why We Forget Things | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Our brains can easily accommodate so much information, but why is it that we remember some things vividly while forget others almost instantly? It turns out, there's a formula that describes how we forget things.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, keepitrealELT
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Kids Do Well If They Can: Links between UDL and the Collaborative Problem Solving Approach

Kids Do Well If They Can: Links between UDL and the Collaborative Problem Solving Approach | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

"The central question of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) surrounds the idea of barriers to learning: Is the child “disabled”? Or, could we more accurately say that many of our school environments are disabling to children?

 

We understand, through UDL, that environments can disable learning and the significance of identifying and eliminating barriers to access. Further, we understand that children whose learning is obstructed by the environment, can sometimes behave in challenging ways. CPS takes this one step more, encouraging teachers to recognize that even children with no physical or cognitive barriers to learning, may struggle with emotional barriers. These may be difficult to identify at times, but identifying and collaboratively addressing these barriers is as essential to our work as it is to ensure that children can work within their preferred learning style, or have access to assistive technologies. This doesn’t mean that the demands of the environment are wrong – “no hitting” is a fair and realistic rule, for instance – simply that some children don’t have the skills to abide by these expectations and that preparing them to do so is a teaching task, not a task of punishment.

 

If we believe (and I do), that children who fail to be engaged in school work and learning are in some way disabled by their environments, then I feel we must believe the same of behaviour. Rather than labeling children with unkind and unhelpful descriptors such as “unmotivated” or “defiant”, we need to see challenging behaviours as expressions of an inability to meet the demands of the environment."

 

Katia Reid asks: "Do you see the same relationship to UDL that I am seeing? I’d love to hear your thoughts!"


Via Kathleen McClaskey, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Principal dd's curator insight, February 7, 2013 3:45 PM

What a perfect lead-in / intro to a staff meeting discussion around inclusion and integration with adaptations! Katia Reid puts it in perfect 'focus' from a perspective we can all appreciate:

 

"Sitting in a large lecture theatre for a presentation that I was attending voluntarily, I reached into my purse for my glasses and realized I had forgotten them at home. The lecture was two hours long and although my hearing is fine, being within a visual fog that made it impossible to see the lecturer was frustrating. After a while, I gave up trying to listen, and I took out my cell phone instead." 


How many of us experience this scenario on similar levels ... yet we know there are students in every classroom experiencing this same scenario. They're usually the easist to identify ... they 'self-identify' through inappropriate behaviour! 

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Struggle Means Learning: Difference in Eastern and Western Cultures

Struggle Means Learning: Difference in Eastern and Western Cultures | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

A very interesting perspective:

 

“I think that from very early ages we [in America] see struggle as an indicator that you’re just not very smart,” Stigler says. “It’s a sign of low ability — people who are smart don’t struggle, they just naturally get it, that’s our folk theory. Whereas in Asian cultures they tend to see struggle more as an opportunity.”

In Eastern cultures, Stigler says, it’s just assumed that struggle is a predictable part of the learning process. Everyone is expected to struggle in the process of learning, and so struggling becomes a chance to show that you, the student, have what it takes emotionally to resolve the problem by persisting through that struggle."


Via Maggie Rouman, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Taking a Mindful Approach to Technology

Taking a Mindful Approach to Technology | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
The South Africans have a beautiful philosophy called Ubuntu, which translates as "I am what I am because of who we all are." This is a perfect way to think about the way a brain develops, influenced by its surrounding people and experiences.

Via ThinDifference, Les Howard, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Social and Emotional Learning Research: Evidence-Based Programs

Social and Emotional Learning Research: Evidence-Based Programs | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Students who are more self-aware and confident about their learning capacities try harder and persist in the face of challenges (Aronson, 2002).

 

Learn how social and emotional learning can help accomplish this.

 

Choosing the best program to implement social and emotional learning in your school can be daunting. Edutopia's research analyst recommends these research-proven programs.


Via Kim Flintoff, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Dyslexia; Advice to Teachers

From parents and students (both adolescent and now adult), cast members from The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia offer advice to teachers.

Via Lou Salza, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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How to Build Your Child's Self-Control | Special Series | Big Think

How to Build Your Child's Self-Control | Special Series | Big Think | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Don't worry about increasing your child's intelligence--there's very little you can do to make a difference. Instead, focus on building your child's self-control.


Via Heather Peretz, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Edmodo: A Guide to Explain it All

This guide will give you the ins and outs of Edmodo. It is to be used as more of a reference manual than anything else, but it covers A LOT of material. Read, enjoy, learn, and share.


Via Tonya Gilchrist, Gianfranco D'Aversa, Louise Robinson-Lay
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Find and Drop Images, Quotes and Info References Into Your Presentations with the New Google Research Tool

Find and Drop Images, Quotes and Info References Into Your Presentations with the New Google Research Tool | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

 

Robin Good: I used to love the Google contextual mini-browser (the Google Deskbar - 2003), something probably most people today have never seen nor have a memory of, but which in my humble opinion, was one of the best and most useful tools released by Google ever.

 

Well the little mini-search tool is back in a new customized format inside the Google Docs Presentation tool, where you can now easily search for reference, quotes, information and images related to the topic you are working on in your presentation.

 

Search becomes contextual and the relevant information found can be immediately integrated into the work we are creating. (Any information or image you find with the Google Research Tool can be intuitively selected and dragged onto the slide area, where it can be sized and positioned in any way you like.)

 

Each content item found with the Google Research Tool and utilized in your slide content is automatically linked back to its original source to simplify the credit and attribution process.

 

Extremely useful. Especially for quotes and images.

 

More info: http://support.google.com/drive/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=2481802

 

Try it out now inside your Google Docs / Drive account: https://drive.google.com/

 

 


Via Robin Good, Jim Lerman, Louise Robinson-Lay
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Nedko Aldev's curator insight, May 8, 2013 3:51 AM

add your insight...

 
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Facilitating Collaborative Learning: 20 Things You Need to Know From the Pros

Facilitating Collaborative Learning: 20 Things You Need to Know From the Pros | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Why have your students work collaboratively? "Collaborative learning teams are said to attain higher levels of thinking and preserve information for longer times that students working individually."

This post provides 20 suggestions to help collaborative groups work more effectively. A few are:

* Establish group goals.

* Keep groups mid-sized.

* Build trust and promote open communication.

* Consider the learning process asa part of the assessment.

The post includes links to a variety of resources and each point has an explantion with additional information.


Via Beth Dichter, João Greno Brogueira, Louise Robinson-Lay
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Channylt's curator insight, April 7, 2014 10:56 AM

Great tips on how to facilitate collaborative learning. Learners that work collaborativley are engaged in their learning and have better learning outcomes. 

Marina Cousins's curator insight, April 10, 2014 8:06 PM

I liked this article, as it highlighted to me the importance of collaborative learning is much better than individual learning.  As I have mentioned several times, the learning and assessment that takes place within my workplace has a strong behaviourist foundation of learning and repeating key words and actions to pass an assessment (it is a very individual approach to learning).

 

Many of my colleagues view this experience of learning & assessment in a negative way.  What are some of the ways to overcome this negative view of learning?

 

After reading this article, I will seriously consider using a collaborative learning style within my workplace (if I get the opportunity).  The advantage of using real world problems or clinical incidents is that it offers the learner the opportunitity to improve their critical thinking skills and problem-solving ability.  

 

Therefore, by using collaborative learning you can apply the following learning theories of cognitivism, constructivism, objectivism.

Hazel Kuveya's curator insight, April 10, 2014 9:22 PM

Keeping the groups at moderate levels will ensure an effective exchange of ideas and participation in all involved, I can echo the same statement that two heads are better than one. It is also interesting to learn that collaborative teams attain higher level thinking and preserve information for longer periods as compared to  their individual counterparts., yes the use of technology makes collaborative learning manageable.

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The 10 fastest-gentrifying public schools in the U.S.

The 10 fastest-gentrifying public schools in the U.S. | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Investigation of whether or not demographic changes in communities are leading to demographic changes in their schools...


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Reframing the Achievement Gap: Education Speaker Pedro Noguera

Reframing the Achievement Gap: Education Speaker Pedro Noguera | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
“The achievement gap is an educational manifestation of inequality.” -Pedro Noguera, a new Q&A on public school reform: http://t.co/TTKeUC2h...

Via Karen Rockhold, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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The Influence of Affective Teacher–Student Relationships on Students’ School Engagement /Achievement

The Influence of Affective Teacher–Student Relationships on Students’ School Engagement /Achievement | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Article: "Influence of affective Teacher–Student Relationships on Students’ School Engagement and Achievement http://t.co/CIelePx9.

 

Overall, Teacher-Student Relationships were more important for children who were academically at risk, in particular for children from disadvantaged economic backgrounds and children with learning difficulties.


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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What Is Dyslexia?

The following is a 6 minute video which gives a parent friendly explanation to some of the symptoms of Specific Learning Disability in reading or dyslexia.  He uses the terms interchangeably which is helpful when working in educational environments.


Via susan koceski, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Constructivism Theory in Teaching and Learning Process ...

Constructivism Theory in Teaching and Learning Process ... | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
Constructivism as a set of educational beliefs about pedagogy (e.g that one should allow the learners to define their own learning objective that knowledge emerges from constructive interaction between the teacher and the students or between...

Via Jem Muldoon, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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The Ethics Of Human Enhancement

The Ethics Of Human Enhancement | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
The British Academy have just released a report on Human Enhancement and The Future of Work headlined by the BBC as “Concern over ‘Souped up’ human race”. A race of humans w...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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