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3 Popular Video Creation Tools Being Used By Teachers - Edudemic

3 Popular Video Creation Tools Being Used By Teachers - Edudemic | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
Allow your students to mix, mash, and video their way to a deeper understanding of the topic by using one of the video creation tools below.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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The Most Misunderstood Aspect Of Great Leadership - Forbes

The Most Misunderstood Aspect Of Great Leadership - Forbes | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
I was recently asked what I consider to be the most misunderstood aspect of great leadership; in other words, what makes great leadership great? What immediately came to mind is not only misunderstood, but it also happens to be the most often overlooked element of leadership, and the one which also affords leaders the greatest opportunity for personal, professional, and enterprise growth.

Via Richard Andrews, Jose Luis Anzizar
AnnC's insight:

Surrender - not for the faint of heart.

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Fathers disappear from households across America

Fathers disappear from households across America | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
In every state, the portion of families where children have two parents, rather than one, has dropped significantly over the past decade.

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
AnnC's insight:

How has or will this trend impact upon our students?

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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, December 27, 2012 5:34 PM

How do we turn this around?

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What's Your Leadership Style: Woof-Woof or Wag-Wag? - Forbes

What's Your Leadership Style: Woof-Woof or Wag-Wag? - Forbes | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
What's Your Leadership Style: Woof-Woof or Wag-Wag?ForbesIn my experience capable executives, especially ones who know how to lead others well, can employ both styles.
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Why Being a Leader Is Less Stressful than Following | TIME.com

Why Being a Leader Is Less Stressful than Following | TIME.com | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
Contrary to the common wisdom that people in positions of power are more stressed than the rest of us, a new study finds that those in higher-ranking roles wield more control and, thus, suffer less stress and anxiety (#Anxiety, #Stress, #Cortisol,...
Via Georgia Feiste, Anne Egros, Bobby Dillard, Jose Luis Anzizar
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Does it pay to know your type?

Does it pay to know your type? | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
In this infographic, you'll get an overview of the 16 types to give a sense of how these bigger-than-life personalities fit in the Myers-Briggs philosophy. The official test is based on Carl Jung’s work in psychological typology.
Via AlGonzalezinfo, Amy Melendez, Jose Luis Anzizar
AnnC's insight:

Carl Jung and Myers-Briggs in history.

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Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, April 28, 2013 9:14 AM

Well, the first claim that the unknown writer makes (no by-line attributed), that universities spend "millions of dollars" each year giving this personality test to their students, is just buncomb: a succinct fairly accurate version of Myers-Briggs is online for free, and that's what we ask students to take.  No one pays for the personality indicator except by means of time to take it and internet connectivity.

 

We then ask the students to write reflections of whether this type suits them or not, and what that means in terms of their study habits and needs. So students are not asked to conform to their types, as this article wants its readers to do; they are asked instead to analyze their typology for accuracy and helpfulness in understanding themselves and their type's relationship to their areas of study.

 

As for the "infographic," I've worked with students to analyze, as a survey, the questions and results of Myers-Briggs in argument classes before, and there's no doubt that the questions asked lead to the answers given.  So it's kind of bizzare that someone *ascribed* types to historical figures who never took the test (or if they did, never made their types known) and then show these figures as "typical" of the types.

 

I personally come up with two of my letters always changing back and forth (INTJ?  ENTP? INTP?  ENTJ?).

 

This "article" is misleading and silly.  In fact, I'll bet that many of these people actually did take the Myers-Briggs: the test was invented back in the '20s and '30s by a mother and daughter who wanted the daughter to marry, knowing what the man was really like.  Actually published in 1943, it was a standard psychological tool for many years; anyone who had psycological counseling in the '60s and '70s probably took it. 

 

So these unnamed writers of this article might do well to search archives and see if any of their reported personalities ever actually took the test.

 

But wait -- that would be real journalism.

Sorry.

Sharla Shults's curator insight, April 28, 2013 4:33 PM

Does it pay to know your type? Some say, yes; others say, no. Lot of study and information on personality traits/types. Do they have merit? What do you think?

Lee Hall's curator insight, April 29, 2013 9:53 AM

Great fun, just call me Peter the Great. :)

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How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

 

 By Jim Taylor, Ph. D.

 

"There is...a growing body of research that technology can be both beneficial and harmful to different ways in which children think. Moreover, this influence isn’t just affecting children on the surface of their thinking. Rather, because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops. For example, as the technology writer Nicholas Carr has observed, the emergence of reading encouraged our brains to be focused and imaginative. In contrast, the rise of the Internet is strengthening our ability to scan information rapidly and efficiently.

 

"The effects of technology on children are complicated, with both benefits and costs. Whether technology helps or hurts in the development of your children’s thinking depends on what specific technology is used and how and what frequency it is used. At least early in their lives, the power to dictate your children’s relationship with technology and, as a result, its influence on them, from synaptic activity to conscious thought.

 

"Over the next several weeks, I’m going to focus on the areas in which the latest thinking and research has shown technology to have the greatest influence on how children think: attention, information overload, decision making, and memory/learning. Importantly, all of these areas are ones in which you can have a counteracting influence on how technology affects your children."


Via Deborah McNelis, M.Ed, Terry Doherty, Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke, Gust MEES
AnnC's insight:

very important as we anticipate how brain configuration in early years will affect later functioning - what to go gain vs. lose in the process?  Think ahead and decide what is important to society and individuals?

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WEAC's curator insight, August 7, 9:55 AM

"Because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops."

Larry Heuser's curator insight, August 8, 3:27 PM

Using the Internet is like jet skiing.  Skimming along the surface of the water at high speed, exposed to a broad vista, surrounded by many distractions, and only able to focus fleetingly on any one thing.

Audrey's curator insight, August 13, 5:56 PM

This is true.  They seem to be absorbing ideas faster.

 

Rescooped by AnnC from Positive Behavior Intervention & Supports: Oakland County
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Indentifying_Barriers_and_Facilitators_in_Implementing_Schoolwide_PBS.pdf

Indentifying_Barriers_and_Facilitators_in_Implementing_Schoolwide_PBS.pdf | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Barriers to Implementation of PBIS:  Great executive summary with very specific recommendations about what DOES work and what doe NOT work.  We will be using this to guide how  we support schools and districts with PBIS implementation


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Grouping Students in Positive, Productive Ways : Venspired}

Grouping Students  in Positive, Productive Ways :   Venspired} | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Krissy has great ideas on who to build community AND get the work of thinking and learning done.  Nice tips, Krissy!


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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The Influence of Affective Teacher–Student Relationships on Students’ School Engagement /Achievement

The Influence of Affective Teacher–Student Relationships on Students’ School Engagement /Achievement | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Article: "Influence of affective Teacher–Student Relationships on Students’ School Engagement and Achievement http://t.co/CIelePx9.

 

Overall, Teacher-Student Relationships were more important for children who were academically at risk, in particular for children from disadvantaged economic backgrounds and children with learning difficulties.


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Can Early Intervention Prevent High School Dropout?

Can Early Intervention Prevent High School Dropout? | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
Can Early Intervention Prevent High School #Dropout?

 

Abbreviated answer:  "YES!"


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NY considers alternative high school pathways

NY considers alternative high school pathways | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Tracking isn't a bad word if the ONLY option isn't for you!


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10 Learnist Boards All About Social Justice - Edudemic

10 Learnist Boards All About Social Justice - Edudemic | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

This week’s Learnist boards are dedicated to educating people on issues of the social justice and recognizing areas for action. 


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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The Best of TED for Teachers

The Best of TED for Teachers | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
The Best of TED for Teachers: TED ( Technology, Entertainment, Design ) is one of the most... http://t.co/HsiZ4jOM #TEDresources #education

Via Shayne Swift
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» ADHD & Parenting: 4 Mindfulness Techniques to Curb Stress - World of Psychology

» ADHD & Parenting: 4 Mindfulness Techniques to Curb Stress - World of Psychology | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) doesn’t just affect the individual.

Via Jem Muldoon, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
AnnC's insight:

Breathe deeply and model what children need to learn.

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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:12 PM

Only one person on auto-pilot at a time!  Parents must be mindful !

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#English: Play online, learn online and feed the hungry | Freerice.com

#English: Play online, learn online and feed the hungry | Freerice.com | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
For every correct answer you choose, 10 grains of rice are raised to help end world hunger through the World Food Programme.

Via Gust MEES
AnnC's insight:

Feed your brain and someone who is hungry too.

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David Hain's curator insight, December 28, 2012 2:52 AM

What a great idea!

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The NEW Leader

The NEW Leader | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
The New Leader  © Irene Becker | www.justcoachit.com-The 3Q Edge™  | Improved Reach-Resonance-Results Helping smart people and organizations lead & communicate forward smarter, faster, happier ...

 

Today, more than ever before ===> the power of Me to We Leadership rests upon the individual and collective consciousness, ability and desire of those who lead, those who manage and those who follow to be resolute in their determination to move forward, lead forward by developing new ways of thinking, communicating and doing that optimize, humanize and monetize our individual and collective potential. Success is a team activity.

 

Read more, very interesting...:

http://justcoachit.com/blog/2012/11/29/the-new-leader/

 


Via Gust MEES, Jose Luis Anzizar
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Top 10 Emotional Intelligence Moments of 2012 - Forbes

Top 10 Emotional Intelligence Moments of 2012 - Forbes | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
ForbesTop 10 Emotional Intelligence Moments of 2012ForbesThis is the fourth consecutive year for this list, and 2012 had no shortage of moments that exemplified emotional intelligence (in some cases, a lack of it).
Via Jose Luis Anzizar
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Neurology-of-Gaming-Infographic

Neurology-of-Gaming-Infographic | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Via JackieGerstein Ed.D., Dennis T OConnor, Jimun Gimm
AnnC's insight:

 We need to share this info with parents so they can help their children make healthy choices regarding types and amounts of video gameplaying  in which they engage.

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Rogério Rocha's comment, December 12, 2012 10:31 AM
Thanks for this Infographic.
nihal abitiu's curator insight, December 25, 2012 4:57 AM

La Neurologie et l'apprentissage

Dennis T OConnor's comment, January 5, 2013 10:41 PM
Note: The origin of this infographic is: http://onlineteachingtoday.wordpress.com/2012/03/31/neurology-of-gaming-infographic/
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The Best Resources For Learning How To Best Give Feedback To Students | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

The Best Resources For Learning How To Best Give Feedback To Students | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day… | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

The ever wise Larry Ferlazzo has captured a nice array of links to information regarding giving feedback to students.  I have not looked at them all, but Carol Dweck is mentioned.  I am going to look into these links more because the issue of specific praise and rewards has been weighing heavily on my heart these days.  Thank you Larry. 


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The Power (and Peril) of Praising Your Kids --

The Power (and Peril) of Praising Your Kids -- | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
The inverse power of praise....

 

Wonderful article highlighting research done by Carol Dweck out of Columbia (and Stanford) on how we talk to children.  Pros and cons of praise are discussed along with implications.  


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Poverty and Education: Solutions?

Poverty and Education: Solutions? | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
Poverty effects education.  It effects test scores.  It effects teacher and student motivation.

 

Time to rethink all the sloppy attempts at reform.  We are missing the boat.


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Bharath Gessian's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:34 AM

Education is one of the most important thing in life and it matters alot. Without it you would not be able to get a proper job and a proper salary. I thought poverty only affects in food, water and socially for a child but i was surprise that education plays a big part when your are poor and it is a big challenge to overcome it. This will afftect the students studying in the school. He will have negative thoughts about himself and will be anti social. They are doing part time job while studying and it will really afect thier studies as it is difficult to multitask.Eventually they drop out or do badly. Hence if they work hard with the right midset, they can definely succeed

Edwin Ong's curator insight, January 18, 2014 2:40 AM

Poverty is really getting serious day by day and it causes many problems to humans. It is the starting problem of many problems and this makes a never-ending cycle once started. As seen from the news above, poverty is started and it affects education, followed by the test scores. It even has the ability to affect teacher and student motivation. Therefore concluding that the word "Poverty" is related to just about every possible negative life outcome one could imagine.

After reading this particular article, I felt disappointed and at the same time, worried for the education system there. I am depressed to learn that the school reform efforts actively ignore the research on poverty in education. They focus instead on test scores and even gaps between high scores and low scores! Seeing that efforts have been made to try and fight the effects of poverty but ultimately losing because of being exhausted, dispirited, I felt worried for the people who are living there in poverty. Even the politicians dare not say the word "Poverty", who knows what will hapen next!

In many cases, i truly believe that poverty can be stopped by helping those in need. For example, we can start to make a difference by helping the needies by donating some money to different charities.

Not onl;y helping  charities, we can also start to give some money to elderies when they sell tissues in the market or hawker centres.

I believe that "to give is to receive". We can and have the ability to stop poverty from spreading throughout the world.

Benjamin Ho's curator insight, January 27, 2014 9:46 AM

My insight

Poverty affects education, i think that that is very true. when students have to worry about their daily meals, how can they concentrate and study. And when students cant do their work properly, they fail, and when they grow up, they will find it hard to find a job. More should be done to help students who are in need of financial help.

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Achievement Gap Goes Global - Getting Smart by Gary Kaplan - edleaders, edreform

Achievement Gap Goes Global - Getting Smart by Gary Kaplan - edleaders, edreform | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
Achievement gap? Which one? It’s not just inner-city schools that need to raise their game.

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Why High School Students Drop Out and Efforts to Re-Engage

Why High School Students Drop Out and Efforts to Re-Engage | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Caralee Johnson Adams has worked as a journalist for nearly 25 years, covering education, health, parenting, and other issues.

 

The reasons:  

 

Absence of parental support or encouragement (23 percent)
Becoming a parent (21 percent)
Lacking the credits needed to graduate (17 percent)
Missing too many days of school (17 percent)
Failing classes (15 percent)
Uninteresting classes (15 percent)
Experiencing a mental illness, such as depression (15 percent)
Having to work to support by family (12 percent)
Was bullied and didn't want to return (12 percent)


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White Dudes Dangling Carrots

White Dudes Dangling Carrots | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

 

 


Let's focus on the problem and not the carrots!


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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