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Can Emotional Intelligence Be Taught?

Can Emotional Intelligence Be Taught? | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
If everybody knows that test scores and grades aren’t the keys to success, how do we teach, and measure, the things that are?

Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 15, 2013 3:42 AM

 

A MUST read!!!

 

 

Gust MEES's curator insight, September 15, 2013 3:45 AM

 

A MUST read!!!


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How Women Decide

How Women Decide | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 5, 2013 6:09 PM

In 2005 seven partners and senior staffers at Deloitte (including the male coauthor of this article) prepared for a meeting with a prospective client, a large hospital undergoing an exciting transformation. Aware that a multimillion-dollar piece of business would be won or lost on the basis of their pitch, the key presenters pored over their slide deck, crossing the t’s and dotting the i’s. They reviewed everything they knew about the hospital and rehearsed their case for why Deloitte was the ideal choice. Their proposal would emphasise Deloitte’s view of projects as collaborations; the team would walk in the client’s shoes.


During the meeting, the partners covered all their talking points. They came away certain that they had addressed every concern outlined in the client’s request for proposal and hopeful that Deloitte would win the project. But they also felt that something had seemed off during the presentation. The consultants and client representatives never quite got on the same wavelength. What could explain the lack of rapport in the room? One aspect of this high-stakes meeting was different from the partners’ usual experience: Half the client attendees were women. The consultants had known this would be the case ahead of time, but it hadn’t occurred to them to alter their pitch in any way because of that. In the end, the hospital did not choose Deloitte for the job.

Nancy Hill's curator insight, September 6, 2013 12:25 AM

This Harvard Business Review piece provides a good overview of female decision making tendencies. 

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Simon Sinek: How Extraordinary Leaders Evolve

Simon Sinek: How Extraordinary Leaders Evolve | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 5, 2013 6:25 PM

Simon Sinek doesn't have the second-most-watched TED talk for nothing. His speech on "How great leaders inspire action," based on his signature concept of starting with "why," is currently at more than 11.5 million views. But the author and speaker is now investigating something new: what he calls the "circle of safety."


In this exclusive Inc. interview, Sinek explains how he arrived at his new thinking and how it applies to leaders today. But his real goal? He hopes to inspire everyone who reads it to immediately take action toward feeling more fulfilled.

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The Science of What Makes an Introvert and an Extrovert

The Science of What Makes an Introvert and an Extrovert | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

 

 


Via The Learning Factor
AnnC's insight:

Allow students to learn in their own way that fits their personality.

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 10, 2013 6:53 PM

Extroverts are typically thought of as those people who are outspoken, outgoing and predominately concerned with what's going on with the outer world. Introverts, by contrast, are quiet, reflective and focused on the inner (mental) world. However, E/I is often seen as a kind of continuum, with people exhibiting a mix of introverted and extroverted tendencies.


If you put introverts into an environment with a lot of stimulation, such as a loud restaurant, they will quickly become overwhelmed or overloaded, causing them to sort of shut down to stop the influx of information. Because of this fact, introverts tend to avoid such active environments. Extroverts, on the other hand, are only minimally aroused, so they seek out highly stimulating environments to augment their arousal levels.

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From OM To OMG: Science, Your Brain, And The Productive Powers Of Meditation

From OM To OMG: Science, Your Brain, And The Productive Powers Of Meditation | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

by Beth Belle Cooper

 

"Using fMRI scans we can now see what meditation does to the brain. The author suggests it can lead to a happier more productive and creative life. And aven two minutes a day cn do wonders."

 

"Whether you’re as skeptical as I used to be, or you’re well ahead of me with a meditation habit of several hours, I think it’s always interesting to find out how new habits affect our brains. I had a look into meditation to see what’s going on inside our brains when we do this, and what I found is pretty interesting.

WHAT IS MEDITATION?

"There are different ways to meditate, and since it’s such a personal practice there are probably more than any of us know about. There are a couple that are usually focused on heavily in scientific research, though. These are focused-attention, or mindful meditation, which is where you focus on one specific thing--it could be your breathing, a sensation in your body or a particular object outside of you. The point of this type of meditation is to focus strongly on one point and continually bring your attention back to that focal point when it wanders.

 

"The other type of meditation that’s often used in research is open-monitoring meditation. This is where you pay attention to all of the things happening around you--you simply notice everything without reacting."


Via Jim Lerman
AnnC's insight:

In a world of multitasking, meditation may be medication :-)

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The Trouble With Bright Girls ~ Psychology Today

The Trouble With Bright Girls ~ Psychology Today | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

by Heidi Grant Halvoson, Ph.D.

 

"Researchers have uncovered the reason for this difference in how difficulty is interpreted, and it is simply this: more often than not, bright girls believe that their abilities are innate and unchangeable, while bright boys believe that they can develop ability through effort and practice. 

 

"How do girls and boys develop these different views? Most likely, it has to do with the kinds of feedback we get from parents and teachers as young children. Girls, who develop self-control earlier and are better able to follow instructions, are often praised for their "goodness." When we do well in school, we are told that we are "so smart," "so clever, " or " such a good student." This kind of praise implies that traits like smartness, cleverness, and goodness are qualities you either have or you don't.

 

"Boys, on the other hand, are a handful. Just trying to get boys to sit still and pay attention is a real challenge for any parent or teacher. As a result, boys are given a lot more feedback that emphasizes effort (e.g., "If you would just pay attention you could learn this," "If you would just try a little harder you could get it right.") The net result: When learning something new is truly difficult, girls take it as sign that they aren't "good" and "smart", and boys take it as a sign to pay attention and try harder."

 
Via Jim Lerman
AnnC's insight:

Socialization and messages play a part in how we think.

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The Soldiers & the Schoolteachers: An Unlikely Coalition Committed to Liberating Genius in America

The Soldiers & the Schoolteachers: An Unlikely Coalition Committed to Liberating Genius in America | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
Together, as an unlikely coalition of soldiers and schoolteachers, politicians and pastors, and business leaders and bankers we can lead the change we want to see--beginning right now.

 

Over the past 20 years, the Internet and technology have changed the world, and the workplace, dramatically. Unfortunately, most students today receive an education substantially similar to what their parents received in the 1970s and 1980s, even as the demands of the job market today are dramatically different than what their parents encountered, and continue to morph every day.

 

Instead of encouraging critical and creative thinking in our children, many of our schools demand that students memorize predetermined answers, or study predetermined methods to deliver the predetermined solution.

 

Instead of creating opportunities to spur kids to "color outside the lines" or "think outside the box," we reward them for turning off their imaginations and toeing the line, or staying in line. No questions asked.

 


Via Gust MEES
AnnC's insight:

We need to enlist more in the cause of education of all our children.

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David Hain's curator insight, September 7, 2013 4:24 AM

More power to them...

Andrew Aker's curator insight, September 8, 2013 9:29 PM

Unlock your inner genius!

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Basic Tips - Changing the volume on your computer

Basic Tips - Changing the volume on your computer | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
15 hours of free training in just 5 minutes a day. 180 free computer technology tips that will teach you basic computer skills in just 5 minutes a day

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
AnnC's insight:

tiny bytes of knowledge over a semester 

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Crush Your Top Collaboration Killers! A Brain-Based Approach

Crush Your Top Collaboration Killers! A Brain-Based Approach | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Learn 3 powerful neuroscience techniques to restore and foster collaboration and teamwork. A fine blog post by Christine Comaford. 


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 15, 2013 11:17 PM

A neuroscience approach is interesting.

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Why We Shouldn’t Be Surprised That Managers Don’t Embrace Complexity

Why We Shouldn’t Be Surprised That Managers Don’t Embrace Complexity | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Before we can manage complexity, we first need to understand it and much of the literature on the subject obscures more than it reveals.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
AnnC's insight:

How do you react to complexity?

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 15, 2013 11:19 PM

Managers deal with complications and problems rather than the paradox of chaos and complexity.

Don Cloud's curator insight, August 16, 2013 7:36 AM

Leaders see complexity, problems, threats, and challenges as opportunities and run towards them ... managers see these as a threat to themselves and cower.  Which are you?

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What Stops Leaders from Showing Compassion

What Stops Leaders from Showing Compassion | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

As a leader, you get paid for your judgment. You are constantly evaluating situations and people. But that strength can become a liability when others need your compassion.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
AnnC's insight:

when caring is what is most needed

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15 Of The Best Educational Apps For Improved Reading Comprehension

15 Of The Best Educational Apps For Improved Reading Comprehension | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

"Reading comprehension is a matter of decoding, reading speed, and critical thinking about the text, all of which can improve with tiered practice.

So below, in an order of general complexity, are 15 apps for improved reading comprehension, ranging from word and sentence fluency, to recall, to critical thinking skills, to reading speed."


Via John Evans
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Bmw's curator insight, September 2, 2013 1:09 PM

thanks John. plenty of ideas for reading.

Karine Thonnard's curator insight, September 5, 2013 7:58 AM

add your insight...

 
Maria Persson's curator insight, September 5, 2013 6:13 PM

Always great to have more than one choice since there isn't one perfect app!

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Seize Your Most Powerful Leadership Moment

Seize Your Most Powerful Leadership Moment | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
Image source The most powerful leadership moment occurs when someone is vulnerable. Leadership is influence. Vulnerability is the channel of influence. Vulnerability is the moment when others are c...

Via John Michel
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John Michel's curator insight, August 26, 2013 11:19 AM

Leaders destroy positive influence when others feel the need to protect themselves. Relationships without vulnerability are driven by self-protective fear.

David Hain's curator insight, August 26, 2013 11:43 AM

I really like the 'vulnerability as a channel' thought...

 

Carpe diem!

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For Teenage Brains, the Importance of Continuing to Learn Deeply

For Teenage Brains, the Importance of Continuing to Learn Deeply | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
It used to be that neuroscientists thought smart people were all alike. But now they think that some very smart people retain the ability to learn rapidly, like a child, well into adolescence.

 

“Until adolescence there are lots of new connections being made between neurons to store patterns and information collected from the environment,” Brant says.

 

The brain adds many synapses in the cortex. This comes at a time when the brain is especially responsive to learning. This is typically followed by cortical pruning in adolescence, as the brain shifts from hyperlearning mode.

Hewitt agrees: “The developing brain is a much more flexible organ than the mature brain.”

 

Learning doesn’t stop at adolescence, of course, but the “sensitive period” — where the brain is hyperlearning mode — does appear to come to an end. Learning new things gets harder.

 


Via Gust MEES
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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 24, 2013 11:44 AM
Thanks Linda. I appreciate the reference to the NPR discussion.
Aramis's curator insight, September 25, 2013 1:56 AM

brilliant

Sharla Shults's curator insight, October 2, 2013 5:40 PM

For some reason, as kids get older, they no longer 'think that thinking' is important! They don't want to think; instead, they simply just want the answer.

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4 Unique Working Styles: What's Yours?

4 Unique Working Styles: What's Yours? | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 5, 2013 6:36 PM

There is nothing more frustrating than listening to people haggle over different definitions of what constitutes "work." Catty conversations about who's working harder, who's working smarter, or who's not working at all are more about judging others than solving inefficiencies.


I'd like to steer you away from this all-or-nothing dialogue ("I work all the time and you never work") to a more robust conversation about what work really is. And, in the process, help you to appreciate not only your own unique working style, but also the working style of others on your team.


As my thinking has developed over the years, and after perusing many, many personality tests, I believe that there are four basic working styles: Doing, Leading, Loving, and Learning.


The best teams have a balance of all four styles. And the best organisations have many well-balanced teams who are confident in their working style and understand the necessity of divergent types or work. So, what's your style?

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60 Reasons Leaders Stop Learning - Let's Grow Leaders

60 Reasons Leaders Stop Learning - Let's Grow Leaders | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 8, 2013 7:04 PM

Competent, lazy leaders are dangerous.


  • “Why fix something that’s working?”
  • “I was promoted to this position for a reason.”
  • “I’ve seen this movie before.”


Beware of highly skilled, non-learning leaders.

60 Reasons Leaders Stop Learning

This week, to kick off our last leg of the REAL model, Learning, I’ve been asking leaders across many contexts why leaders stop learning.  Here’s the top 60.  Don’t fall into these traps.  Be deliberate in your learning.  If you’re already a great leader, read more closely.  Leadership is never handled.

Don Cloud's curator insight, September 9, 2013 7:47 AM

In the spirit of self-awareness and optimism, this is an opportunity for leadership self-assessment and 60 opportunities to improve ones own leadership.

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The Evolution Of Work

The Evolution Of Work | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Via The Learning Factor
AnnC's insight:

It is about time for structures to open up.  We have known that open systems work better in science for a long time.  

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 14, 2013 1:07 PM

Adaptation!  It's important to prepare for the future.  Also see a related piece that relates to the technology impacts:  

Miguel Cañas's curator insight, September 16, 2013 2:21 PM

Great Infographic about the evolution of work

John Michel's curator insight, September 23, 2013 2:36 PM

The smart leaders understand the concept of following from the front, that is, removing obstacles from the paths of employees to help them become successful.  Scaring your employees into doing what you want is a failed approach to leadership yet unfortunately this is how many of our companies were created; it’s time to evolve this way of leading.

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Failing the Test: Why Cheating Scandals and Parent Rebellions Are Erupting in NYC, DC, and Atlanta ~ Slate

Failing the Test: Why Cheating Scandals and Parent Rebellions Are Erupting in NYC, DC, and Atlanta ~ Slate | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

by David L. Kirp

 

"It’s a terrible time for advocates of market-driven reform in public education. For more than a decade, their strategy—which makes teachers’ careers turn on student gains in reading and math tests, and promotes competition through charter schools and vouchers—has been the dominant policy mantra. But now the cracks are showing. That’s a good thing because this isn’t a proven—or even a promising—way to make schools better.

 

"Here’s a litany of recent setbacks: In the latest Los Angeles school board election, a candidate who dared to question the overreliance on test results in evaluating teachers and the unseemly rush to approve charter schools won despite $4 million amassed to defeat him, including $1 million from New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and $250,000 from Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. Former Atlanta superintendent Beverly Hall, feted for boosting her students’ test scores at all costs, has been indicted in a massive cheating scandal. Michelle Rhee, the former Washington D.C. school chief who is the darling of the accountability crowd, faces accusations, based on a memo released by veteran PBS correspondent John Merrow, that she knew about, and did nothing to stop, widespread cheating. In a Washington Post op-ed, Bill Gates, who has spent hundreds of millions of dollars promoting high-stakes, test-driven teacher evaluation, did an about-face and urged a kinder, gentler approach that teachers could embrace. And parents in New York State staged a rebellion, telling their kids not to take a new and untested achievement exam."


Via Jim Lerman
AnnC's insight:

how do we improve education?

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, September 5, 2013 1:49 PM

This hardly qualifies as hard-nosed social science research, however Kirp's article does provide ample documentation (and good links) of what he terms, "The cracks are showing,"

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A Multitasking Video Game Makes Old Brains Act Younger ~ NY Times

A Multitasking Video Game Makes Old Brains Act Younger ~ NY Times | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

by Matt Richtel

 

"Brain scientists have discovered that swerving around cars while simultaneously picking out road signs in a video game can improve the short-term memory and long-term focus of older adults. Some people as old as 80, the researchers say, begin to show neurological patterns of people in their 20s.

 

"Cognitive scientists say the findings, to be published Thursday in the scientific journal Nature, are a significant development in understanding how to strengthen older brains. That is because the improvements in brain performance did not come just within the game but were shown outside the game in other cognitive tasks.

 

"Further supporting the findings, the researchers were able to measure and show changes in brain wave activity, suggesting that this research could help understand what neurological mechanisms should and could be tinkered with to improve memory and attention."


Via Jim Lerman
AnnC's insight:

Playing some videogames may help keep our brains young.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 6, 2013 12:49 PM

Useful and surprising findings on a good place for multi-tasking.  ~ Deb

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Watch a Classroom Management Expert

Watch a Classroom Management Expert | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
See how this 9th-grade English teacher connects with his students, earns their trust, and then invites them to contemplate their future with -- or without -- reading skills.




At the beginning, wa

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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LundTechIntegration's curator insight, September 5, 2013 10:09 AM

Great to see actual examples from teachers doing great things in their classrooms. 

Samantha Burton's curator insight, October 25, 2013 6:02 AM

Teachers connect with students everyday. We can choose the quality of those connections and look for those incidental teaching " moments" to build positive relationships with students.

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The 12 Habits Of Highly Collaborative Organizations

The 12 Habits Of Highly Collaborative Organizations | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Collaboration is indeed a top priority for many business leaders but knowing what makes organizations successful can be a tricky thing.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
AnnC's insight:

How do we build collaborative processes in schools?

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Are Connections Overshadowing Collaboration?

Are Connections Overshadowing Collaboration? | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Connections can be counted, and they are needed to make collaboration work. How do we prevent over-connectedness and under-collaboration?


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
AnnC's insight:

an important discrimnation between interpersonal processes - how do we grow trust?

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Make Your Work More Meaningful

Make Your Work More Meaningful | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Critically important to performance and well-being, meaning is what makes people thrive. And conversely, a lack of it undermines people's ability to function on many levels, from job performance to mental and physical health.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
AnnC's insight:

We need meaning in addition to food, security, and other basics.

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Top 10 (Mostly Free) Apps for Classroom Management - Smart Apps For Kids

Top 10 (Mostly Free) Apps for Classroom Management - Smart Apps For Kids | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

"Great classroom management is key to success in any classroom. If you are a teacher, you know how it feels to walk into class on the first day of a new school year and think, "My kids were better than this last year." Then, you remember that you are comparing new students in your room who do not know your ways of doing things with kids you had for a whole school year. This is especially true for the lower grades."


Via John Evans
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xemabg's curator insight, August 28, 2013 3:46 AM

Por si sirve...

Eihreann's curator insight, August 28, 2013 7:08 AM

Just for Apple...

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Tales of a 6th Grade Classroom: Apps We Love: Brain Game Edition

Early finishers? Try these brain game apps: http://t.co/Y3duBiyoaa #edtech #edchat #iosedapp


Via Dr. Joan McGettigan
AnnC's insight:

don't let them grow bored as they wait for others to catch up.

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