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Rescooped by AnnC from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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The Evolution Of Work

The Evolution Of Work | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Via The Learning Factor
AnnC's insight:

It is about time for structures to open up.  We have known that open systems work better in science for a long time.  

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 14, 2013 1:07 PM

Adaptation!  It's important to prepare for the future.  Also see a related piece that relates to the technology impacts:  

Miguel Cañas's curator insight, September 16, 2013 2:21 PM

Great Infographic about the evolution of work

John Michel's curator insight, September 23, 2013 2:36 PM

The smart leaders understand the concept of following from the front, that is, removing obstacles from the paths of employees to help them become successful.  Scaring your employees into doing what you want is a failed approach to leadership yet unfortunately this is how many of our companies were created; it’s time to evolve this way of leading.

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4 Unique Working Styles: What's Yours?

4 Unique Working Styles: What's Yours? | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 5, 2013 6:36 PM

There is nothing more frustrating than listening to people haggle over different definitions of what constitutes "work." Catty conversations about who's working harder, who's working smarter, or who's not working at all are more about judging others than solving inefficiencies.


I'd like to steer you away from this all-or-nothing dialogue ("I work all the time and you never work") to a more robust conversation about what work really is. And, in the process, help you to appreciate not only your own unique working style, but also the working style of others on your team.


As my thinking has developed over the years, and after perusing many, many personality tests, I believe that there are four basic working styles: Doing, Leading, Loving, and Learning.


The best teams have a balance of all four styles. And the best organisations have many well-balanced teams who are confident in their working style and understand the necessity of divergent types or work. So, what's your style?

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60 Reasons Leaders Stop Learning - Let's Grow Leaders

60 Reasons Leaders Stop Learning - Let's Grow Leaders | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 8, 2013 7:04 PM

Competent, lazy leaders are dangerous.


  • “Why fix something that’s working?”
  • “I was promoted to this position for a reason.”
  • “I’ve seen this movie before.”


Beware of highly skilled, non-learning leaders.

60 Reasons Leaders Stop Learning

This week, to kick off our last leg of the REAL model, Learning, I’ve been asking leaders across many contexts why leaders stop learning.  Here’s the top 60.  Don’t fall into these traps.  Be deliberate in your learning.  If you’re already a great leader, read more closely.  Leadership is never handled.

Don Cloud's curator insight, September 9, 2013 7:47 AM

In the spirit of self-awareness and optimism, this is an opportunity for leadership self-assessment and 60 opportunities to improve ones own leadership.

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How Women Decide

How Women Decide | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 5, 2013 6:09 PM

In 2005 seven partners and senior staffers at Deloitte (including the male coauthor of this article) prepared for a meeting with a prospective client, a large hospital undergoing an exciting transformation. Aware that a multimillion-dollar piece of business would be won or lost on the basis of their pitch, the key presenters pored over their slide deck, crossing the t’s and dotting the i’s. They reviewed everything they knew about the hospital and rehearsed their case for why Deloitte was the ideal choice. Their proposal would emphasise Deloitte’s view of projects as collaborations; the team would walk in the client’s shoes.


During the meeting, the partners covered all their talking points. They came away certain that they had addressed every concern outlined in the client’s request for proposal and hopeful that Deloitte would win the project. But they also felt that something had seemed off during the presentation. The consultants and client representatives never quite got on the same wavelength. What could explain the lack of rapport in the room? One aspect of this high-stakes meeting was different from the partners’ usual experience: Half the client attendees were women. The consultants had known this would be the case ahead of time, but it hadn’t occurred to them to alter their pitch in any way because of that. In the end, the hospital did not choose Deloitte for the job.

Nancy Hill's curator insight, September 6, 2013 12:25 AM

This Harvard Business Review piece provides a good overview of female decision making tendencies.