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Complex (psychology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Complex (psychology)

A complex is a core pattern of emotions, memories, perceptions, and wishes in the personal unconscious organized around a common theme, such as power or status (Schultz, D. & Schultz, S., 2009). Primarily a psychoanalytic term, it is found extensively in the works of Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud.

An example of a complex would be as follows: if you had a leg amputated when you were a child, this would influence your life in profound ways, even if you were wonderfully successful in overcoming the handicap. You might have many thoughts, emotions, memories, feelings of inferiority, triumphs, bitterness and determinations centering on that one aspect of your life. If these thoughts troubled you, Jung would say you had a complex about the leg (Dewey, 2007).

 

Complex existence is widely agreed upon in the area of depth psychology. It assumes the most important factors influencing your personality are deep in the unconscious (Dewey, 2007). They are generally a way of mapping the psyche, and are crucial theoretical items of common reference to be found in therapy. Complexes are believed by Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud to influence the individual's attitude and behavior.

 

===> In one phrase said: being felt involved and feeling vulnerable to a certain TOPIC which is OUT of NORMAL common sense <=== 



Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 26, 2014 5:17 PM


===> In one phrase said: being felt involved and feeling vulnerable to a certain TOPIC which is OUT of NORMAL common sense <=== 


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Unlock Your Emotional Genius

Unlock Your Emotional Genius | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
How emotionally intelligent are you, and why should you care?

 

Successful intelligence requires that we know how to put our intellectual best foot forward.  Sometimes this means having just plain common sense, or “street smarts.”  Successful intelligence also involves having “emotional intelligence,” also called "EI," which is being to read people’s feelings- and your own.  

 


Via Gust MEES
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ThePinkSalmon's comment, February 2, 2013 12:08 PM
Many times you get the best results just by applying "street smarts" along with "a bit of" empathy.
Gust MEES's comment, February 2, 2013 12:17 PM
@ThePinkSalmon Full agreed! That's the way I am working ;)
Gust MEES's comment, February 2, 2013 12:20 PM
@ThePinkSalmon When giving courses + by observing learners one gets the feedback 2 feel how the learners "Understand" without asking even ;)
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How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

 

 By Jim Taylor, Ph. D.

 

"There is...a growing body of research that technology can be both beneficial and harmful to different ways in which children think. Moreover, this influence isn’t just affecting children on the surface of their thinking. Rather, because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops. For example, as the technology writer Nicholas Carr has observed, the emergence of reading encouraged our brains to be focused and imaginative. In contrast, the rise of the Internet is strengthening our ability to scan information rapidly and efficiently.

 

"The effects of technology on children are complicated, with both benefits and costs. Whether technology helps or hurts in the development of your children’s thinking depends on what specific technology is used and how and what frequency it is used. At least early in their lives, the power to dictate your children’s relationship with technology and, as a result, its influence on them, from synaptic activity to conscious thought.

 

"Over the next several weeks, I’m going to focus on the areas in which the latest thinking and research has shown technology to have the greatest influence on how children think: attention, information overload, decision making, and memory/learning. Importantly, all of these areas are ones in which you can have a counteracting influence on how technology affects your children."


Via Deborah McNelis, M.Ed, Terry Doherty, Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke, Gust MEES
AnnC's insight:

very important as we anticipate how brain configuration in early years will affect later functioning - what to go gain vs. lose in the process?  Think ahead and decide what is important to society and individuals?

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WEAC's curator insight, August 7, 2015 9:55 AM

"Because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops."

Larry Heuser's curator insight, August 8, 2015 3:27 PM

Using the Internet is like jet skiing.  Skimming along the surface of the water at high speed, exposed to a broad vista, surrounded by many distractions, and only able to focus fleetingly on any one thing.

Audrey's curator insight, August 13, 2015 5:56 PM

This is true.  They seem to be absorbing ideas faster.

 

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Psychology of Color

Psychology of Color | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

This simple infographic goes a long way in explaining to you what emotions each color evokes. Use this to set up your home or office, and also to communicate effectively with your clients.


Via Martin Messier, Natalie Stewart, Heather Ramsey
AnnC's insight:

how do colors influence one's mood, attention, learning?

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Psychological Foundations of Learning

Psychological Foundations of Learning | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, January 22, 2013 7:53 AM

A very intimate analysis of human learning as humans understand it to be.  Includes several maps highlighting various theories.  This one will take some time to digest, but for the school psychologist, it will be worth the time.  

Les Howard's curator insight, January 22, 2013 10:26 AM

Agree with Mary, very comprehensive analysis.