School Psychology Tech
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Rescooped by AnnC from Leadership, Strategy & Management
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If You're Not Helping People Develop, You're Not Management Material

If You're Not Helping People Develop, You're Not Management Material | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
Facilitating employee learning should be a non-negotiable competency.


Skilled managers have never been more critical to the success of firms than they are today.  Not because employees can’t function without direction, but because managers play a vital role in talent management.


Via Emeric Nectoux
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Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, February 7, 2014 12:24 AM

Good managers attract candidates, drive performance, engagement and retention, and play a key role in maximizing employees’ contribution to the firm.


Poor managers, by contrast, are a drag on all of the above.  They cost your firm a ton of money in turnover costs and missed opportunities for employee contribution, and they do more damage than you realize.

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Why empathy is your most important business skill - Jennifer Walpole

Why empathy is your most important business skill - Jennifer Walpole | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
Empathy is sorely lacking in today's fast-paced world, but exercising empathy can set any professional apart and become a tremendous business asset.

 

What separates empathetic people

Empathetic people spend more time listening than talking because they want to understand other people’s motivations, reasons, and difficulties; allowing them to connect on a deeper level and give the other person a sense of being heard and recognized. An employer who is empathetic is able take the time to understand the needs of their employees, enabling them to provide support and understanding in difficult times. And by providing this, employers are building and strengthening trust, alone with a sense of belonging; which can lead to greater collaboration and improved productivity.


Via Edwin Rutsch, Emeric Nectoux
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How to Respond to Negativity

How to Respond to Negativity | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
"I'm getting to the end of my patience," Dan,* the head of sales for a financial services firm, told me. "There is so much opportunity here — the business is growing, the work is interesting, and bonuses should be pretty...

Via Maria Rachelle
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Maria Rachelle's curator insight, June 4, 2013 4:18 PM

This articles give you some great insights on effectively turning around negative people. Now read.

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11 Ways You Can Make Your Space as Collaborative as the Stanford d.school

11 Ways You Can Make Your Space as Collaborative as the Stanford d.school | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
The Stanford d.school, which opens officially on May 7, is a space whose design has been refined over the course of six years to maximize the...

Via Barry Magee, Emeric Nectoux
AnnC's insight:

Part of the school environment involves encouraging places and situations and inspire collaborative thinking.

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Barry Magee's curator insight, February 6, 2014 1:20 PM

The good folks in Stanford figured out the reason for so much 'good thinking' and innovation in Silicon valley wasn't just the talent pool available - it was HOW people met.  

Simply, people who worked for different companies met at school events, sports events, kids games etc and just started talking.  These 'ACCIDENTAL COLLISIONS' were the source of a lot of overlap thinking and spurred key innovation practices which Stanford has now tried to replicate it its own new campus.

Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, February 6, 2014 11:32 PM
Barry Magee's insight:

The good folks in Stanford figured out the reason for so much 'good thinking' and innovation in Silicon valley wasn't just the talent pool available - it was HOW people met.  

Simply, people who worked for different companies met at school events, sports events, kids games etc and just started talking.  These 'ACCIDENTAL COLLISIONS' were the source of a lot of overlap thinking and spurred key innovation practices which Stanford has now tried to replicate it its own new campus.

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Accountability: If It Is To Be, It’s Up To Me

Accountability: If It Is To Be, It’s Up To Me | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
When things get messed up—and they do—some people respond with lying, denying or minimizing their own responsibility. Leaders know that to be respected or trusted they must be accountable.

Via Don Cloud, Emeric Nectoux
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