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Technology is Rewiring Your Brain

Technology is Rewiring Your Brain | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
Scientists say our ability to focus is being undermined by bursts of information from e-mail and other interruptions.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Susan Taylor
AnnC's insight:

HOW DO WE CHOOSE TO EVOLVE?

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Susan Taylor's curator insight, October 14, 2013 5:55 PM

A few years ago, Kord Campbell missed the email of his life -- for 12 days.  How did this happen?  Through an electronic flood of email, IM, chats and web browers, it simply slipped through the cracks.

 

Campbell managed to save his million dollar deal, "yet continues to struggle with the effects of the deluge of data. Even after he unplugs, he craves the stimulation he gets from his electronic gadgets. He forgets things like dinner plans, and he has trouble focusing on his family."

 

This is our brain in the Digital Age.

 

Generally, our ability to focus is being undermined by never-ending bits of information coming at us 24/7.  Information overload, multitasking, interruptions and constant distraction hampers work and family life.

 

"Nonstop interactivity is  one of the most significant shifts ever in the human environment."  The bottom line?  Technology is rewiring our brains, exposing us "to an environment that asks our brains to do things we weren’t necessarily evolved to do.  We know already there are consequences.”

 

We are at a moment of dramatic change. 

 

The greatest threat?  "Heavy technology use diminishes empathy by limiting how much people engage with one another -- even in the same room.  That empathy is essential to the human condition."

 

In an age that supposedly keeps us more connected, we are in fact becoming more fragmented. The human condition -- the unique features of being human -- is becoming more fragile.

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Tomorrow's Leaders are Training their Brains

Tomorrow's Leaders are Training their Brains | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
Mindfulness training is helping business leaders rethink the way they make big decisions, stay sane and get ahead at work, says neurologist Dr Tamara Russell. (Can you really retrain your brain?

Via Susan Taylor
AnnC's insight:

BE COGNIZANT OF THE MOMENT FOR YOUR BRAIN'S SAKE.

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Susan Taylor's curator insight, October 9, 2013 9:12 AM

Great insights about the benefits of mindfulness in today's turbo-charged business environment.  The article also touches upon the importance of being present with those who really matter to us.

 

To be mindful is to be alert and aware to what is unfolding in any given moment.  This includes being engaged with how your mind and body reacts to certain situations. Enlightened leaders are learning that mindfulness -- training the mind to pay attention -- takes both discipline and practice.

 

"By repeatedly training the mind to pay attention to the sensations of the body as they enter the brain, mindfulness training uses this information to build up an exquisitely sensitive understanding of our reactions and responses in the world -- both at work and elsewhere in our lives."

 

Benefits of training include:

 

  • The ability to be present with others
  • Improvements in attention
  • Enhanced memory and recall
  • Advanced problem-solving
  • Increased creativity

 

For best results, the author suggests you train in a quiet dedicated environment where you will not be interrupted. Just 20 minutes of mindfulness training in the morning, for example, will "radically change how you experience your work day and relate to others."

 

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Multitasking: An Impediment to Thinking & Behaviour

Multitasking: An Impediment to Thinking & Behaviour | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it
More and more articles on the web state that multitasking and doing 10 things at a time, not only hamper creativity and innovation as well as reduce people’s ability to behave in an ‘emotionally in...

Via Jenny Ebermann, Susan Taylor
AnnC's insight:

BE MINDFUL OF WHAT IS HERE.

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Susan Taylor's curator insight, October 13, 2013 4:08 PM

We've all done it...participating in a conference call while checking email, Tweeting and checking our Facebook news feed.  Driving while on our cell phone (hopefully hands free) and drinking coffee.  Dinner with the family in conversation together until the phone beeps indicating we have a new text message.

 

Whatever it is we are doing -- one thing is clear.  Doing too many things at the same time not only hampers our creativity and innovation; research now shows that multi-tasking can affect our memory, leading to stress and even illness.

 

So what do you do the next time you need to be in three places at the same time?  Jenny Ebermann suggests that "we need to learn to scale down and approach tasks, demands and workload in a different, mindful way."