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Secrets to Creating a Positive School Culture In a BYOD Environment | Digital Learning Environments

Secrets to Creating a Positive School Culture In a BYOD Environment | Digital Learning Environments | School Library Tools | Scoop.it

by Eric Sheninger

 

"I hear a great deal of conversation in the education world about transforming school culture.  I have even added to that dialogue on numerous occasions.  It wasn’t until now that I realized the most significant piece to the change and transformation process is our students.  This most important stakeholder group is often left out of this conversation.  So what are the secrets to transforming school culture? Make it a student-centered process, give up control, respect their ideas then implement them, and get out of the way. For it is they, our students, who ultimately transform school culture. We are just playing in their sandbox."


- See more at: http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/leadership/secrets_creating_positive_school_culture_byod_environment#sthash.CPtgD9Zp.dpuf


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 19, 2014 1:52 PM

A key seems to be that there is room for the detail work involved to be done at the teacher and student level. When that space is not there, it is difficult to make innovations work.

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Lower prices for unlimited e-books

Lower prices for unlimited e-books | School Library Tools | Scoop.it
Two new services will lend you an unlimited number of titles to read on your phone or tablet. Which to choose?

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10 Modern Teaching Skills

10 Modern Teaching Skills | School Library Tools | Scoop.it
Do you possess Modern Teaching Skills? As with most professions today, there are rapid developments in teaching that are being driven by social and technological changes. Keeping up to date with these developments within education will pay dividends with...

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 28, 2014 11:19 PM

Being committed is different than being devoted. Most of these have been around for some time, but it worth being reminded of them from time to time and creating our own lists.

Rescooped by Amanda Alexander from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Learning Literary Terms With Taylor Swift

Learning Literary Terms With Taylor Swift | School Library Tools | Scoop.it
This article was written by teen reporters from The Mash, a weekly publication distributed to Chicagoland high schools.

By Kiley Roache, Nazareth High School

Whether you’re prepping for the AP Literature exam, or trying to crank out that ...

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, February 17, 2014 12:53 PM

17 February 2014

 

I can't say that I'm an expert on Taylor Swift lyrics. But, I have taken some teasing because I've found the lyrics to the few songs I've listened to, to be quite touching and poetic. 

 

In that limited experience, I was attracted to the storytelling aspect of her lyrics. They struck me as being as personal as quite thoughtful journal entries taken seriously by someone who cared and paid the price for doing so. Very touching.

 

And, now, thanks to Kiley Roache, of Nazareth High School, we have this article sharing several examples of the way Taylor Swift has used several literary devices in her lyrics.

 

If literary devices are intended to enhance the relationship between a writer's intent and the receptiveness of that writer's audience, then perhaps it might be significantly more effective to introduce  those literary devices via examples that really exist in the world of our students rather than only in the world of literary scholarship. That is, the power of literary devices may be more effectively "learned" when the focus is upon bringing the story to the reader rather than focusing upon bringing the reader to the device. 

 

Would I use this article in class. "Absolutely except..."

 

One lesson I learned long ago, is that too many students' have extremely rigid pre-established opinions about music types, genres, and performers to assume that sharing any musician's lyrics will be a welcome endeavor by all.

 

Seems obvious doesn't it? Different students have different tastes in music and more typically than not, for the most part they have yet to develop a breadth of musical appreciation that allows them to be receptive to music beyond the breadth of "their favorite" kinds of music. 

 

As an aside, it might be worth considering how far beyond their established interest in storytelling and beyond their Vygotskian Zone of Proximal Development we ask them to be receptive to when we assign all of them to study the same work of literature. 

 

Perhaps if we took every opportunity to wrap literary reading learning experiences around the question every students asks, "What does this have to do with anything I care about?" we might find more of them receptive to the lessons we design in our attempt to address the question every professional educator asks, "How can I use literature to encourage students to contemplate  not only what they care about but what they ought to consider caring more about?"

 

Bait the hook! 

 

Fans of Taylor Swift will "bite" a lesson on literary devices built around this article because it begins with  an established appetite. They'll feel a closer and deeper attachment via their "fandomness" to her work and probably rush out to other fans to clue them into the depths of Swift's lyrics that they've discovered.

 

If this is true for Taylor Swift fans then a parallel experience is probably true for students who happen be fans of other musicians.

 

Building upon this premise, I might ask students to email me a phrase from a lyric that they are particularly fond of.

 

I would print each one on a single sheet of 8.5x11 white paper using Helvetica font in the largest point size that I could so that the phrase would still fit on the single sheet of paper. 

 

I wouldn't identify the source. (student or musician).

 

Before class the next day, I would hang them around the room with as much space between them as possible on walls where there was ample space to walk.

 

I would immediately invite students to walk around and read the phrases with one intent. What do you suppose it was about each phrase that "someone" in this class thought was particularly meaningful? 


I would emphasize that it isn't important whether or not they find the phrase particularly meaningful. The focus being simply what did the writer of the lyric do with words that caused at least one of his or her fans to really connect with the phrase.

 

Then, I'd introduce this article assuring students who do not "care for Taylor Swift" that they don't have to watch the videos if they can't bring themselves to do so. They need only concentrate upon the term and the example.

 

The subsequent task being, "Did you see examples of 'any' of these terms in the phrases the class brought in?

 

It wouldn't surprise me if the students discovered that the use of literary devices is fairly common and that regardless of musical taste, many of these devices find themselves being used across many musical genres.

 

If there is merit in this thesis, then perhaps letting non-Swift fans  start with their favorite lines from their favorite musicians regardless of the teacher's opinions (informed or otherwise) about those musicians and then letting them discover what it was about those lines that they found particularly interesting would serve as an equally engaging and more successful approach than say, teaching cliché, oops, I mean simile by telling them  about someone being "as hungry as a bear;" or, explaining the allusion being made in one story they are not enjoying to another story they never heard of.

 

And, I would also suspect that once they've had some experience noticing the use of literary devices in stories they already have a personal engagement with, that they would have enough "lock on the concept" to begin noticing them in the works on the official course reading list.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

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A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: Teacher-Librarians

A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: Teacher-Librarians | School Library Tools | Scoop.it

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Bookmarking Librarian's curator insight, February 19, 2014 8:18 PM

Useful links for teacher librarians

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Teacher Librarians at The Heart of Student Learning

School library and information technology programs are a vital resource for student learning. This video to highlight the essential role teacher librarians p...
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Building Your Personal Learning Network

How school librarians can start a PLN to keep up-to-date and personalize their learning.
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What Should a 21st-Century School Library Look Like?

What Should a 21st-Century School Library Look Like? | School Library Tools | Scoop.it
There’s an empty room at the REALM Charter School, which opened three years ago in an existing commercial building in Berkeley, Calif. When Emily Pilloton, director of the school’s Studio H design and build class, and Hallie Chen, an eighth-grade teacher, asked students what they envisioned for the space, they...

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 27, 2014 12:12 AM

This is one of those things that makes perfect sense and engages students in a great way.

Rescooped by Amanda Alexander from 21st Century Teacher Librarians and School Libraries
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SCIS | School library collections survey 2013

SCIS | School library collections survey 2013 | School Library Tools | Scoop.it
In 2013 SCIS conducted an online survey of Australian school library staff to find out more about the state of school library collections. Clare Kennedy reports on the survey results.

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lyn_hay's curator insight, February 12, 2014 8:05 PM

This article outlines the major issues identified by 300 Australian school library staff. The strongest concerns of school library staff were the lack of adequate funding for resources and the lack of time and qualified personnel available to provide a high standard of service, with primary schools more likely to cite budget and staffing constraints. Also of note was concern of school library staff in being able to effectively support the resourcing of the new Australian Curriculum, with over half of the schools stating they had difficulty finding age- and curriculum-appropriate resources was a substantial access issue. One major challenge currently facing school library staff is how to manage the growing number of digital resources for those who have access to funds. However, there is also growing concern of smaller schools and primary schools being left behind with regard to digital resource provision.

It would be great to see more teacher librarians taking the time to complete this survey at the end of 2014 to help our profession gain a better understanding of the true status of school library collections in Australia's schools.

Audrey Nay's curator insight, March 1, 2014 2:05 PM
lyn_hay's insight:

This article outlines the major issues identified by 300 Australian school library staff. The strongest concerns of school library staff were the lack of adequate funding for resources and the lack of time and qualified personnel available to provide a high standard of service, with primary schools more likely to cite budget and staffing constraints. Also of note was concern of school library staff in being able to effectively support the resourcing of the new Australian Curriculum, with over half of the schools stating they had difficulty finding age- and curriculum-appropriate resources was a substantial access issue. One major challenge currently facing school library staff is how to manage the growing number of digital resources for those who have access to funds. However, there is also growing concern of smaller schools and primary schools being left behind with regard to digital resource provision.

It would be great to see more teacher librarians taking the time to complete this survey at the end of 2014 to help our profession gain a better understanding of the true status of school library collections in Australia's schools.

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Librarians juggle demand for eBooks, print - Milford Daily News

Librarians juggle demand for eBooks, print - Milford Daily News | School Library Tools | Scoop.it
Librarians juggle demand for eBooks, print Milford Daily News She said print books and periodicals currently comprise 68 percent of the library's collection of 130,000 items, while eBooks and other electronic devices make up 32 percent, an...

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The Future of School Libraries

This video was created for EDES 545 Information Technologies For Learning, as part of the Teacher-Librarianship by Distance Learning Masters Program through ...
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