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How To Create A Quiz in Google Forms

Please LIKE our video and Subscribe to our channel! http://www.TeacherCast.net | TeacherCast Educational Broadcasting Network Video recorded by Jef

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, February 15, 4:51 PM
A very quick (and noisy) introduction to Google Forms. It takes you through the whole creation focus. No voice-over, just messages in text, telling you what to do.  Something else to add to the arsenal when introducing Google Forms to others.
Codie Bower's curator insight, February 16, 5:14 PM
Quick, easy Assessment tool at your fingertip!
Patricia Papazoglou's curator insight, April 4, 5:10 PM

This video will show you how to create a quiz using google forms.

The quiz is easy to set up and will automatically be graded and saved.

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 Lessons Learned About Kiddle

 Lessons Learned About Kiddle | School Library Info | Scoop.it

Kiddle - a visual search engine for kids, powered by editors and Google safe search. Not a Google product!


Via Mary Reilley Clark
Susanne Sharkey's insight:

A final (3/4/2016) update on Kiddle:

 

So, I posted about this great search engine on LM_NET. Gary Price of InfoDocket then pointed out that NO search engine is completely safe, and that promoting Kiddle may give teachers, parents and students  a false sense of security. Kiddle also had a judgmental snark to it: when students searched "penis", the response was something like "Oops, looks like a bad word."  The folks behind Kiddle are very responsive--today when I looked up that "bad word", I was told instead "Oops, try again." A few weeks ago, you were out of luck if you wanted information about breast cancer from Kiddle. (Another "bad word.")  Now, if you type in "breast", you'll get links to Butterball turkey, KidsHealth.org's article about breasts and bras, and lots of information about breast cancer. So, Kiddle is trying. Not perfect by any means, but trying. Perhaps worth keeping in your pocket when World Book is too elementary, but your students struggle with the reading level in a database. (My middle school SAI students hate the portal for World Book)

 

But here's where things got weird. Last week, I saw several people tweet and post about Kiddle as "Google's new kid-friendly search engine." It was amazing how fast that incorrect tweet spread. Most librarians I know who shared it later corrected their blogs or tweets, but a lot of folks didn't. (A quick look at the URL should give you a clear indication Kiddle is not part of the Google family.)

 

So, bottom line: 1. Kiddle isn't perfect. 2. No search engine is. 3. The people behind it, anonymous though they may be, seem to have good intentions, and are constantly working to improve the site based on feedback. 4. WE can do a better job helping students think about searching and directing them to more targeted sites, rather than general search engines (Thanks for that reminder, Gary Price!) 5. We all need to be careful about sharing and retweeting without verifying. And 6. That Butterball turkey link made me realize dinner isn't going to cook itself.

 

                ******************************************

Original post:

 

I used Kiddle today with a specialized academic instruction class. The large thumbnails with plenty of white space made it easier for students to decide which sites they would look at first. Kiddle developers rank websites as follows:

 

The first 1-3 sites will be written specifically for children and are chosen by Kiddle editorsThe following sites (usually 5-7) will be safe sites with content not specifically written for children, but at a reading level they can understand. These are also chosen by Kiddle editorsThe remaining sites are filtered by Google Safe Search, not geared to children, and possibly harder to understand.
 
Kiddle would be great for elementary students. The filters are very strict--search for information on breast cancer, and you'll be told you're searching for "bad words." Still, I think the visual aspect of the search would appeal to many students, so I'll continue to use it with our SAI classes.
 
*** Update ****
 
I wanted to share some feedback I received from Gary Price of InfoDocket. 
when words are misspelled, safety filters are for naught, i.e., "beheaddings" (although the images that make it through the filters when it's spelled correctly are pretty graphic, too.)the filters can block appropriate searches, such as "breast cancer" or "adult education". 
 
So, as with any other search engine or website, we need to teach students about safe searches and critical thinking!
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GwynethJones's curator insight, January 26, 2016 6:15 PM

Share with your Elem peeps!

Brenda Rogers's curator insight, March 6, 2016 4:11 PM

I used Kiddle today with a specialized academic instruction class. The large thumbnails with plenty of white space made it easier for students to decide which sites they would look at first. Kiddle developers rank websites as follows:


The first 1-3 sites will be written specifically for children and are chosen by Kiddle editorsThe following sites (usually 5-7) will be safe sites with content not specifically written for children, but at a reading level they can understand. These are also chosen by Kiddle editorsThe remaining sites are filtered by Google Safe Search, not geared to children, and possibly harder to understand.
Kiddle would be great for elementary students. The filters are very strict--search for information on breast cancer, and you'll be told you're searching for "bad words." Still, I think the visual aspect of the search would appeal to many students, so I'll continue to use it with our SAI classes.
***Update****
I wanted to share some feedback I received from Gary Price of InfoDocket. 
when words are misspelled, safety filters are for naught, i.e., "beheaddings" (although the images that make it through the filters when it's spelled correctly are pretty graphic, too.)the filters can block appropriate searches, such as "breast cancer" or "adult education". 

So, as with any other search engine or website, we need to teach students about safe searches and critical thinking!
lfredric's curator insight, March 9, 2016 4:38 PM

A final (3/4/2016) update on Kiddle:

 

So, I posted about this great search engine on LM_NET. Gary Price of InfoDocket then pointed out that NO search engine is completely safe, and that promoting Kiddle may give teachers, parents and students  a false sense of security. Kiddle also had a judgmental snark to it: when students searched "penis", the response was something like "Oops, looks like a bad word."  The folks behind Kiddle are very responsive--today when I looked up that "bad word", I was told instead "Oops, try again." A few weeks ago, you were out of luck if you wanted information about breast cancer from Kiddle. (Another "bad word.")  Now, if you type in "breast", you'll get links to Butterball turkey, KidsHealth.org's article about breasts and bras, and lots of information about breast cancer. So, Kiddle is trying. Not perfect by any means, but trying. Perhaps worth keeping in your pocket when World Book is too elementary, but your students struggle with the reading level in a database. (My middle school SAI students hate the portal for World Book)

 

But here's where things got weird. Last week, I saw several people tweet and post about Kiddle as "Google's new kid-friendly search engine." It was amazing how fast that incorrect tweet spread. Most librarians I know who shared it later corrected their blogs or tweets, but a lot of folks didn't. (A quick look at the URL should give you a clear indication Kiddle is not part of the Google family.)

 

So, bottom line: 1. Kiddle isn't perfect. 2. No search engine is. 3. The people behind it, anonymous though they may be, seem to have good intentions, and are constantly working to improve the site based on feedback. 4. WE can do a better job helping students think about searching and directing them to more targeted sites, rather than general search engines (Thanks for that reminder, Gary Price!) 5. We all need to be careful about sharing and retweeting without verifying. And 6. That Butterball turkey link made me realize dinner isn't going to cook itself.

 

                ******************************************

Original post:

 

I used Kiddle today with a specialized academic instruction class. The large thumbnails with plenty of white space made it easier for students to decide which sites they would look at first. Kiddle developers rank websites as follows:

 

The first 1-3 sites will be written specifically for children and are chosen by Kiddle editorsThe following sites (usually 5-7) will be safe sites with content not specifically written for children, but at a reading level they can understand. These are also chosen by Kiddle editorsThe remaining sites are filtered by Google Safe Search, not geared to children, and possibly harder to understand.
 
Kiddle would be great for elementary students. The filters are very strict--search for information on breast cancer, and you'll be told you're searching for "bad words." Still, I think the visual aspect of the search would appeal to many students, so I'll continue to use it with our SAI classes.
 
*** Update ****
 
I wanted to share some feedback I received from Gary Price of InfoDocket. 
when words are misspelled, safety filters are for naught, i.e., "beheaddings" (although the images that make it through the filters when it's spelled correctly are pretty graphic, too.)the filters can block appropriate searches, such as "breast cancer" or "adult education". 
 
So, as with any other search engine or website, we need to teach students about safe searches and critical thinking!
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Thousands of Free Media Files in the Public Domain Project - FRACTUS LEARNING

Thousands of Free Media Files in the Public Domain Project - FRACTUS LEARNING | School Library Info | Scoop.it
It doesn’t take a lot of digging to find free media online, but more often than not, although these assets may be free to view and often download, copyright and licensing rules can put some pretty heavy restrictions on using them. This is where sites like the Public Domain Project can be of huge value, providing easy and searchable access to media files that are completely free of all known copyright restrictions. And that’s about as free as free gets on the modern web.

Via John Evans
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5 Tools for Helping Students Find Creative Commons Images - FRACTUS LEARNING

5 Tools for Helping Students Find Creative Commons Images - FRACTUS LEARNING | School Library Info | Scoop.it
To help navigate the often confusing space that is digital copyright, here are five tools that we recommend to help students find Creative Commons images.

Via John Evans
Susanne Sharkey's insight:

Provides great tools/sites to recommend and show to staff and students.

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Willemijn Schmitz's curator insight, September 23, 2014 3:27 AM

Images ter inspiratie

Olga Boldina's curator insight, September 24, 2014 10:36 AM

добавить свой понимание ...

Ann Ewel's curator insight, September 24, 2014 7:04 PM

Great resource -- this list will help out our students. We need to keep encouraging our students to use material with the Creative Commons license. 

 

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Apps that rise to the top: Tested and approved by teachers

Apps that rise to the top: Tested and approved by teachers | School Library Info | Scoop.it

With the thousands of educational apps vying for the attention of busy teachers, it can be hard to sift for the gold. Michelle Luhtala, a savvy librarian from New Canaan High School in Connecticut has crowd-sourced the best, most extensive list of appsvoted on by educators around the country.

 

“I wanted to make sure we had some flexibility because there’s no one app that’s better than all the others,” Luhtala said. Some apps are best for younger students, others are more complicated, better suited for high school students. Many apps do one thing really well, but aren’t great at everything. Still others are bought, redesigned or just disappear — so it’s always good to know about an array of tools to suit the need at hand.

 


Via Edumorfosis
Susanne Sharkey's insight:

Terrific list of apps to use at various levels.

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Craig Crossley's curator insight, June 12, 2014 12:28 AM

Here the whole document - great ideas for IPAD use and OPTIONS FOR MULTI MODAL PRESENTATIONS....

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, June 12, 2014 10:30 PM

Thx John Evens

Karen Sampson's curator insight, June 18, 2014 7:43 PM

Teachers and Techies are always looking for educational apps that are engaging for students, but promote student learning of content or skills and/or applying their current knowledge in a new way

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Secrets of Storytime: 10 Tips for Great Sessions from a 40-year Pro

Secrets of Storytime: 10 Tips for Great Sessions from a 40-year Pro | School Library Info | Scoop.it
Storytime is the premium service for children in public libraries across the country. For many youth librarians, it's the most treasured part of their job. A storytime veteran shares her best practices.

Via Karen Bonanno
Susanne Sharkey's insight:

nice article on public library storytime with tips.

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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, April 23, 2014 12:19 AM

Interacting with children through story

Anita Vance's curator insight, April 24, 2014 12:53 PM

Great programs are planned with children and adults in mind - these tips help keep all the pieces together....Keep on sharing!

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Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information

Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information | School Library Info | Scoop.it
An essential part of online research is the ability to critically evaluate information. This includes the ability to read and evaluate its level of accuracy, reliability and bias. When we recently as
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9 Things Every Student Should Be Able to Do with Google Drive ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

9 Things Every Student Should Be Able to Do with Google Drive ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | School Library Info | Scoop.it

"Google Drive is a powerful productivity suite with an increasing potential in education. From storing documents to creating stunning presentations and drawings, Google Drive empowers you with the necessary tools to enhance your productivity and augment your workflow.  I have been sharing several guides and materials on how teachers can tap into the power of this platform and this section aggregates all I have shared in this regard so far."


Via John Evans
Susanne Sharkey's insight:

Great suggestions on how students can use Google Docs

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Larissa Bonthorne's curator insight, March 10, 2014 6:24 PM

This is a guide to some of the knowledge that students should have for Google Drive.  This could be developed over time, rather than expecting students to have all of these skills.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 12, 2014 2:28 AM
9 Things Every Student Should Be Able to Do with Google Drive
Ness Crouch's curator insight, March 29, 2014 5:51 PM

I've still got a few things to teach my class but we are getting there.

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Projects to Engage Middle School Readers

Projects to Engage Middle School Readers | School Library Info | Scoop.it
It's my fault. I'll admit it. During my eight years in the classroom, I ruined at least two amazing literary works by assigning horrifically dull reading projects. My only hope is that those middle s

Via Mary Reilley Clark
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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:09 PM

Great and fairly easy to implement ideas!

Ann Lynn's curator insight, February 12, 2014 8:17 AM

Ideas and links for projects that can demonstrate student understanding of stories.

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Landing a school librarian position – Part 1 of 2 - ProQuest Blog

Landing a school librarian position – Part 1 of 2 - ProQuest Blog | School Library Info | Scoop.it

In Part 1 of this two-part blog, we'll examine the qualifications most often cited for school library media specialist (SLMS) candidates. ... Leader; Instructional partner; Information specialist; Teacher; Program administrator.


Via Floyd Pentlin
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5 great Video Clips to Learn more about PLNs ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

5 great Video Clips to Learn more about PLNs ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | School Library Info | Scoop.it
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Need to learn more about PLN's

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The Top 10 iPad Tips For Teachers

The Top 10 iPad Tips For Teachers | School Library Info | Scoop.it
In an effort to keep everyone using them as effectively as possible, the wonderful Lisa Johnson (of TechChef4U fame) assembled this David Letterman-esque Top Ten list of iPad tips for teachers.

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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, November 23, 2013 4:03 PM

A printable PDF available

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Awesome Visual on The Importance of Reading Aloud to Kids ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Awesome Visual on The Importance of Reading Aloud to Kids ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | School Library Info | Scoop.it
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How to Use Flippity's Google Sheets Add on

Flippity.net offers ten convenient Google Sheets templates for teachers. The new Flippity Add-on for Google Sheets makes those templates easy to access.

Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, February 23, 4:45 AM
Richard Byrne takes you through the new Flippity add-on for Google Chrome and the 11 new templates to use with the application including quizzes and bingo cards.
Patricia Papazoglou's curator insight, April 4, 4:54 PM

Flippity is an add on to Google.  It uses a spreadsheet format to create a variety of tracking and educational tools.  In this tutorial you can learn how easy it is to  install and use. I have used it to create flashcards and play quiz games.  Try it out it's free!

 

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How important are libraries in elementary schools?

It’s no secret that when funding goes for a elementary school, one of the first affected areas is the school library. A school with a dedicated library could end up with only a shelf in a classroom. A

Via Karen Bonanno
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Anita Vance's curator insight, January 31, 2015 9:31 AM

From ALA - a radio interview that positively describes modern school libraries and librarians.

Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, January 31, 2015 12:11 PM

A School Library is a whole school resource. "Buy a resource for the library you buy it for the whole school to use. Buy a resource for the science department then only the science students get the benefit" Great point!

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Every child should learn to program, but not necessarily how to code - theguardian.com

Every child should learn to program, but not necessarily how to code - theguardian.com | School Library Info | Scoop.it
I am a proud geek and father of three young children. I taught myself to code Basic at the age of 12 on my father’s Commodore 64, and I actively encourage my children to be enthused by the notion of building with digital tools. But I don’t necessarily agree with the notion that every child must learn how to code.

Via John Evans
Susanne Sharkey's insight:

Have been reading a lot about coding lately. "programming" as opposed to "coding"

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Sally Tilley's curator insight, October 22, 2014 5:58 PM

A brilliant insight into what really matters when giving kids / parents opportunities to delve into the world of programming, thanks Christian Hernandez!

asli telli's curator insight, October 23, 2014 5:22 AM

Code, Program or both?

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A Handy Visual Featuring The 7 Learning Styles

A Handy Visual Featuring The 7 Learning Styles | School Library Info | Scoop.it
September 10, 2014
During the first month of the new school year, teachers get to know their students in terms of their learning levels, where they are at with their learning, their strengths and...

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
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Ellen J Irion's curator insight, September 13, 2014 2:45 PM

Awesome to remember this.  I have always loved Multiple Intelligence theory.

Craig Seasholes's curator insight, September 14, 2014 10:31 AM

Gardner's Habits of Mind on one visually rich page. I like it!

Peter van Cuylenburg's curator insight, September 14, 2014 7:29 PM

This is another part of the fabric of personalising learning.  It is still worthy of a place in that particular conversation regarding the students our classes.

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A Great Student Rubric for Reviewing Apps ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

A Great Student Rubric for Reviewing Apps ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | School Library Info | Scoop.it

"To help her students understand and be able to analyze the apps they come across online, Mutt Susan from Digital Divide and Conquer http://bit.ly/1nG4TZF ; has created this wonderful rubric. The Student App Review Rubric,  features five sections ( or criteria) that students can grade when assessing an app. Each of these criteria can be graded with a numerical number from 0 to 4 with 4 as the top grade.

The five criteria included in this rubric are :

Looks and soundEngagement and motivationUser friendly directions and instructionsPerformance and ease of useDifferentiation in learning."


Via John Evans
Susanne Sharkey's insight:

Nice Rubric for students.

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Darleana McHenry's curator insight, April 23, 2014 8:16 PM

I think that it is a great idea to teach students and parents how to evaluate apps. I like to try them for a trial period but it is great to have a rubric

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For Teachers: The Difference between Fair Use and Copyright

For Teachers: The Difference between Fair Use and Copyright | School Library Info | Scoop.it
April 22, 2014
Some of you are still probably not sure about the difference between what constitutes a copyright infringement and fair use. Well the post I have for you today might help illuminate...

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
Susanne Sharkey's insight:

something to check out and share.

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Naomi Bates's curator insight, April 22, 2014 7:03 PM

Another great resource is Rene Hobbs, who wrote Copyright Clarity: 

 

http://mediaeducationlab.com/copyright

Sonia Barchet's curator insight, April 23, 2014 9:00 AM

Great copyright info.

Sandra Carswell's curator insight, April 29, 2014 12:07 AM

Simple explanation of copyright and fair use. I like the document with the graphic from Common Sense Media. 

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The 5 Elements Students Should Look For When Evaluating Web Content

The 5 Elements Students Should Look For When Evaluating Web Content | School Library Info | Scoop.it
March , 2014
In a section in her wonderful book "Understanding The Social Lives of Networked Teens" Danah Boyd talked extensively about the concept of digital natives and argued that this...

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
Susanne Sharkey's insight:

Nice clear video, not sure about acrony of CRAAP for ES, but MS and higher-similar to RADCAB, 

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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, April 1, 2014 4:51 PM

If you've been paying attention at all, you've know for years that "digital natives" are not necessarily information literate. As Danah Boyd notes in her book, "Just because teens are comfortable using social media to hang out does not mean that they’re fluent in or with technology. Many teens are not nearly as digitally adept as the often-used assumption that they are “digital natives” would suggest."

So check out this blog post that explains the CRAAP test to share with tweens and teens.

Character Minutes's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:15 PM

Good advice and easily understood!

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Do I just Google that? Tools for Teaching Search Skills in the Primary Classroom

Do I just Google that? Tools for Teaching Search Skills in the Primary Classroom | School Library Info | Scoop.it

Via Elizabeth Hutchinson, Sue @ Crushingcinders
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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, February 18, 2014 6:06 PM

Very useful resources here. 

Karen Draper's curator insight, February 19, 2014 4:01 PM

I love "infographs"

Glenda Morris's curator insight, April 8, 2014 3:22 PM

great infographic 

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31 iPad Apps For A Smoother-Running Classroom

31 iPad Apps For A Smoother-Running Classroom | School Library Info | Scoop.it
31 iPad Apps For A Smoother-Running Classroom A smooth-running classroom is about, among other things, organization, workflow, and classroom management. Organization is about resources, priority, and consistency.

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, January 22, 2014 11:37 AM

Great examples of apps that help both teachers AND students. This is another keeper from TeachThought staff writers and one you should share with your teachers.

Annie M Herbert's curator insight, January 25, 2014 12:00 PM

Might be good for class this coming week plus looking at when I have more time.

Eric Mason's curator insight, March 28, 2016 5:29 PM

Great examples of apps that help both teachers AND students. This is another keeper from TeachThought staff writers and one you should share with your teachers.

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Steal This Infographic: Librarians as Tech Leaders - The Digital Shift

Steal This Infographic: Librarians as Tech Leaders - The Digital Shift | School Library Info | Scoop.it
Librarians are leading the way in technology use, according to School Library Journal's annual technology survey. SLJ’s got the proof, and we encourage you to share it.

Via Nicole Laura
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Google Search by Image - A Simple Visual Guide for Teachers and Students

Google Search by Image - A Simple Visual Guide for Teachers and Students | School Library Info | Scoop.it
Have you ever tried Google search by image functionality ?This is a service that allows users to identify potential sources of images on the web. This is a good way for students to pool resources and...

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, December 2, 2013 1:58 PM

Cool technique with step-by-step directions for searching Google by image. 

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The many benefits of reading [infographic]

The many benefits of reading [infographic] | School Library Info | Scoop.it
Everyone knows reading is good, but sometimes we tend to forget about it, especially in view of, well, video screen. National Reading Campaign, a Toronto-b

Via Linda Denty, Elizabeth Hutchinson
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Linda Denty's curator insight, November 12, 2013 5:44 PM

Whilst this is sourced from Canada, I suspect the content would be true for most western countries, and should also be the case everywhere in an ideal world.