School Library: Classroom Climate
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The Power of the Morning Meeting: 5 Steps Toward Changing Your Classroom and School Culture

The Power of the Morning Meeting: 5 Steps Toward Changing Your Classroom and School Culture | School Library: Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
"The whole morning meeting not only sets a really good tone for the students, but it sets a tone for me." - Teacher in Louisville, Kentucky

When I first learned about the Morning Meeting model, I wa
Robin Kinney's insight:

Given the constraints of the library class time, I might use what I think of as a "micro meeting".  Our class ritual might be to have all the students troop into the library and go directly to the story time space.  There we will have our micro meeting, which would consist of a greeting, drawing one student's name & that student telling us about a book he/she has enjoyed recently (either as a reader or a listener), then setting the stage for that day's lesson.  Setting the stage would be to either introduce a new project, or quickly summarize what we did last week, and what we plan to achieve this week.  Lower grades would probably get a story, but I'd then have the whole class transition to the tables to start work on their projects.  The goal would be for the meeting to be completed in 5-10 minutes, leaving us 20-25 minutes for the lesson, and the traditional 15 minutes for book check.

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Don't Let the Pigeon Touch the Books! - YouTube

Created to replace our usual 'how treat our books' talk at the beginning of each new school year. By Ms. MacDonald and Mrs. Russell with lots of inspiration ...
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This was just WAY too cute to pass up! A fun example of how NOT to treat the books in students' care - and thus one of the library norms. Just remember... Don't Let the Pigeon Touch the Books!
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Demco.com -  Allied Aero Activity Tables

Demco.com -  Allied Aero Activity Tables | School Library: Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
Choose Demco for all your library supplies! Enjoy superior customer service & more
than 50,000 products including security labels, book carts and library furniture.
Robin Kinney's insight:

I would like to use these tables in my Instructional and Production & Group Activities area for a variety of reasons.  Larger tables like these, designed for multiple students, automatically sort students into groups.  They are available in a variety of shapes, so I would be able to find the best shape for the space available.  Rectangular tables are best when space is tight, because you can fit them in more efficiently, but round tables improve collaboration because nobody can sit at the head of the table, and everyone is an equal distance from each other, so everyone can see/hear equally well.  By not having corners, we also increase the space around the tables for student movement.  Other shapes are also available, but I'd need to see them in a catalog. (What exactly do they mean by "horseshoe" and "flower"?  How many kids would they sit?)  I also like that there are lockable wheels that I can buy for this line of tables.  If I find that I am moving the tables around a lot, and they don't slide easily, then I can get the wheels for easier reconfiguration.  ("Accommodate changes" being in Maryland State Standard 6.04).

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AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf

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This document, from the American Association of School Librarians (a division of the American Library Association), discusses the attitudes school librarians must instill into students.  I must boil these dispositions down for the students (ex: "be adaptable" rather than 1.2.5 "Demonstrate adaptability by changing the inquiry focus, questions, resources, or strategies when necessary to achieve success.").  During class, we can brainstorm on what these dispositions mean, ensuring that the discussion includes what AASL expects of us & our classes.

 

Since I have a set of dispositions established by my national professional organization, I feel that the norms and dispositions in my classroom must be teacher/organization generated.  Thinking logically, since I'll be teaching all the students in the school (unless I'm in a large enough school that there's another librarian stationed with me), I would go crazy trying to remember THAT many different sets of student-generated norms & dispositions.  This is one of those areas where my expectations and options are different from my classroom teacher colleagues, who are instructing far fewer students, for longer periods of time.

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Demco.com -  Demco® Liberation™ Wood & Steel Mobile Shelving

Demco.com -  Demco® Liberation™ Wood & Steel Mobile Shelving | School Library: Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
Choose Demco for all your library supplies! Enjoy superior customer service & more
than 50,000 products including security labels, book carts and library furniture.
Robin Kinney's insight:

These shelves, intended for the interior of the library space (the parameter would have fixed shelving, around 5' high) feature wheels and a flat display space on top.  The wheels allow the library to be reconfigured, as needed, throughout the year for major projects, and to accommodate the changing needs of SLM State Standards 6.04.  The flat space on top serves double duty - to display new books when major shipments come in, and display student projects so that the entire school can view the display throughout the week.  I have pictures of similar project displays from Reservoir High School's library.

 

Due to the need to keep the books in a logical (and labeled) order, these shelves would only be moved for major projects & only after carful consideration for the logic of the resulting library layout.  Medium and small scale projects would be served using book trucks, which can also be rolled to classrooms or other spaces throughout the school.  They hold fewer books, but are much more maneuverable.

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Libraries designed without old-fashioned books, for new-fashioned readers - Bellingham Herald

Libraries designed without old-fashioned books, for new-fashioned readers - Bellingham Herald | School Library: Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
Bellingham Herald
Libraries designed without old-fashioned books, for new-fashioned readers
Bellingham Herald
"There are a lot of libraries that are shifting that way," said Barbara Stripling, the president of the American Library Association.
Robin Kinney's insight:

While I think this goes overboard, I think an extensive digital collection can support learning by making an extensive, up to date, collection available 24/7.  This idea should be mined for its gems, but libraries should maintain a print collection.  I may concede the argument that non-fiction be a primarily digital department due to its ability to be updated as our understanding about the world changes.

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The iPad: Helping Shape the Future of Education

The iPad: Helping Shape the Future of Education | School Library: Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
With the continuous development of faster and more robust mobile networks, educators are looking into the iPad to help build a digital classroom experience.
Robin Kinney's insight:

Having these available for use by a class would allow students to access the library's databases and ebook collection.  As Ms. Binki McKenna (Reservoir High School) pointed out in our interview, ebooks allow an entire class to access a single title simultaneously.  IPads also have other apps that can support the Common Core curriculum, such as when, in LBSC 642, we used Videolicious to create and publish a persuasive piece - a book talk promoting a particular title.  IPads also don't take up much space, which should help when they're not in use.

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Library Videos - YouTube

Library Videos - YouTube | School Library: Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
Robin Kinney's insight:

I'm finding a lot of fun videos about libraries and how to act properly in the library (such as using a book marker and proper book care).  Rather than list them all separately, here's a link to the YouTube channel I created.  As one of our classroom routines, I might take the last 5 minutes (or so) and run one of these movies on the Instructional Area screen.  This warns the students still doing book checks that it is time to make their final selections & check out - and for all the students to line up for returning to their classroom.  The line would be situated so that students in line can watch the movie.  In addition to signaling students, this is also a fun way to reinforce what libraries are all about and how to behave in the library (using shelf markers & proper book care, etc).  I would create a play list for lower elementary, middle elementary, and upper elementary - in part because 5th graders are unlikely to be amused by Sesame Street, but all grades are likely to enjoy the book bandits.

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Elementary Library Routines #Edgerton School District - YouTube

Mrs. Kees' class shows us the routines of our library as we start the school year. Thanks to Brianna L. for the narration.
Robin Kinney's insight:

I scooped this video because it showed several of the library spaces that the Maryland State Standards expect in a library, and many aspects of how I would like the physical space. The stadium style seating in the instructional area was an interesting feature, but not only can it not be added to an existing library, but it cannot adapt to the changing needs of the library - as both adding and moving would require renovation - which is expensive. As you watch this video, notice the words on the columns. I like this as a way to display the expected dispositions - visible, able to be pointed out, but otherwise fading into the background -- there, without being in-your-face. You could also use them as gathering points - today we start the line at Adaptability (who can give me an example of being adaptable?) - but next week, we might line up at Teamwork. If my library doesn't have columns, then maybe I could hang the dispositions as banners around the upper periphery of the space, or attach them to bulkheads.

 

As for the routines, they would only work for PBL if they were to loosen up a lot.  Yes, file in and out as a class -- but why seat/dismiss row by row in the instructional area?  To take this teacher-centric instructional style and make it more PBL friendly, the routines need to loosen up quite a bit.  Also - I"m NOT having students put unwanted books on the top of the shelves.  Students need to learn how to put books away properly, so I'll teach them how to use Book Markers (as shown in some of the YouTube videos I selected).  Yes, more books will be out of place & I'll need to shelf-read more -- but that's all a part of learning.

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IMAG0754.jpg (640x361 pixels)

IMAG0754.jpg (640x361 pixels) | School Library: Classroom Climate | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Anderson pinned another image from the Kindergarden Smindergarden blog, which can be found at http://kindergartenschmindergarten.blogspot.com/2012/09/open-house-week-new-teacher-blog-tuesday.html.

Robin Kinney's insight:

A craft supplies space like this supports the Maryland State Standards 6.01.05, "storage space for supplies & materials," & 6.01.04, "Production and Group Project Area."  For my library, I'd want to hybridize this with the photo that Elizabeth Anderson pinned from the same site.  The way I'd do it, I'd have a supplies caddy (like the green, blue & yellow ones on the top shelf, pictured here) stocked with the materials I anticipate students will need for a particular lesson.  These would be stored in a supplies closet and set out, one per table, in the Instructional Area/Production and Group Project Area (6.01.04-5 -- I'd probably only have one space for both of these functions) before a class's arrival. If I had enough caddies so that each grade had it's own set, I'd be able to swap out materials, as needed, ahead of time.  In addition to these caddies, students might also have access to other supplies, like in the green boxes (above) on the middle and lower shelves, or like the ones Elizabeth pinned.  This would give students access to supplies that I hadn't anticipated.

 

The reason why I'd provide a supplies caddy for each table is because, as I understand it, students only have 30 minutes of library instruction, plus 15 minutes for book check.  To be more efficient with those 30 minutes, I want to reduce the time spent fetching supplies and prevent crowding at the supplies shelves.  Craft supply boxes would also need to have snap-to-close lids to reduce student temptation to play with the supplies when they should be selecting books.

 

Upon reflection, I'd probably also use flat book trucks instead of shelves for the craft supplies.  Book trucks are more mobile, allowing me to bring it out when we're creating, and put it away when we're done.  I also don't have to worry as much about where to put the supplies shelf so that it won't interfere with the other functions of the library.

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Demco.com -  Demco® LibraryQuiet™ 6-Sloping Shelf Booktruck

Demco.com -  Demco® LibraryQuiet™ 6-Sloping Shelf Booktruck | School Library: Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
Choose Demco for all your library supplies! Enjoy superior customer service & more
than 50,000 products including security labels, book carts and library furniture.
Robin Kinney's insight:

For those who don't know library lingo... this is a book truck.  (Also known as a book cart.)  I probably would also have some with flat shelves for transporting AV equipment, although the higher end AV equipment (laptops, tablets, etc) have their own cart which is also a charging station.  For my PBL supportive library, I would have the proper number of carts, of the proper types, to support the equipment that I circulate to support various teachers' projects.  I would need to be sure to have 2 book trucks similar to the one pictured above, just for the books waiting to be re-shelved.

 

Looking at the other ideas curated here, I will also need to be sure to have a decently sized space to keep the carts not currently in use.  I'll be using them a lot, so may find that I need a lot.  The size of the book truck "fleet" can be controlled by organizing materials so they can be quickly & easily re-loaded between classes -- unused materials living on stock room shelves.

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Big Cozy Books | Gallery

Big Cozy Books | Gallery | School Library: Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
Book themed furniture that kids of all ages love for any reading nook. Great for libraries, schools, child care centers, church nurseries, bookstores, pediatric medical or dental waiting areas
Robin Kinney's insight:

This would make for a lovely story area - part of the elementary Informal Reading Area (6.01.02 of the Standards for the School Library Media Programs in Maryland).  If I'm at a school with a forest or aquatic themed name (like Forest Ridge Elementary), then I'd select one of the forest or aquatic themed seating areas (I really like the mushrooms), but otherwise I'd select a book themed space, selected according to the space available.  Since this is modular furniture, it can be rearranged according to the needs of the lesson.

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SLMStandards1.pdf

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Page 12 provides the standards for what needs to be in the school library.  I had previously erroneously remembered this as being from AASL.  These standards must be considered when dreaming up what my PBL-friendly school library should have.

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