School Libraries make a difference
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School Libraries make a difference
School Libraries and their impact on student learning and reading
Curated by Sharon Hayes
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Veronica Roth Explains Why Shocking 'Allegiant' Death Had To Happen - MTV.com

Veronica Roth Explains Why Shocking 'Allegiant' Death Had To Happen - MTV.com | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

"Allegiant" — the final installment of Veronica Roth's best-selling "Divergent" series — has been in readers' hands and on their Kindles for nearly a week now, meaning fans finally know the fate of heroine Tris Prior and her love, Tobias Eaton. The heart-wrenching conclusion no doubt surprised many — with fans galore taking to social media to cry, commiserate or complain about Roth's vision for the characters she so lovingly crafted over the trilogy.


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AASL's School Libraries Count! 2012 report [pdf]


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lyn_hay's curator insight, July 3, 2013 1:28 AM

Summary of the 2012 statistical results of the School Libraries Count longitudinal study on the status of American school libraries. The pdf of the published report is http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/researchandstatistics/slcsurvey/2012/AASL-SLC-2012-WEB.pdf

Keith Koehler's curator insight, September 8, 2013 8:37 PM

AASL always has great information.

 

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Should more YA fiction be read in schools?

Should more YA fiction be read in schools? | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

If there is anywhere that young adult literature should be read, it's schools. But more and more it seems that curriculums have to be followed, and books that could be relevant to teenagers (and, in a lot of cases, books altogether) are getting left behind.

 

 


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The 5 Best Free Slideshow Presentation and Creation Tools for Teachers

The 5 Best Free Slideshow Presentation and Creation Tools for Teachers | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
Utilizing technology in the classroom is always an enjoyable experience. However, using the same old programs can get old after a while.
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School Librarians Must Be Assertive Leaders, Technology Experts | SLJ Summit 2013

School Librarians Must Be Assertive Leaders, Technology Experts | SLJ Summit 2013 | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
School librarians must be assertive leaders and technology experts, Joel Castro, associate superintendent for the Lubbock, Texas, School District, told attendees at SLJ's annual Leadership Summit in Austin in September.

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Tricia Adams's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:26 AM

This applies equally in the UK as in the US

Lourense Das's curator insight, October 18, 2013 2:19 PM

School librarians as assertive leaders. Nice invitation to work on our competencies ;-)

Sandra Sawyer McLeroy's curator insight, October 18, 2013 3:50 PM

He was an awesome speaker AND his wife is a librarian! He knows what he is talking about.

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Reading gives kids an edge, study says

Reading gives kids an edge, study says | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
Children who read for fun may do better in the classroom than peers who rarely read.
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Teen Board: What's So Great About Harry Potter Anyway?

Teen Board: What's So Great About Harry Potter Anyway? | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

When I saw that it was the 15th anniversary of J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series being published in the United States, I started wondering...Why do so many people love the world of Harry Potter? I mean, the books have been translated into over 60 languages, the series is one of the best selling book series in history, there is a Harry Potter theme park, and there are eight movies! What’s so great about Harry Potter?


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Free World Digital Library for Teachers and Students

Free World Digital Library for Teachers and Students | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

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Angela Wilkins's curator insight, March 17, 2013 9:23 AM

Knowledge Building

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40 Ways to Use Google Apps in Education ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

40 Ways to Use Google Apps in Education ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

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4 Powerful Apps to Visually Sketch Ideas on iPad

4 Powerful Apps to Visually Sketch Ideas on iPad | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

One of the best techniques to catch and record ideas is through using visual graphs. Data that is visually encoded is more likely to be processed by the mind in a faster and easier way. This is probably the reason why students love it when comics and graphic are included in instruction.


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25 hilarious street art and mural works about books, libraries and reading

25 hilarious street art and mural works about books, libraries and reading | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
There are many ways to express that books are an essential part of our life. Using books as building materials is not necessarily the good way. Street art

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Curriculum & Leadership Journal | School libraries and teacher-librarians: evidence of their contribution to student literacy and learning

Curriculum & Leadership Journal | School libraries and teacher-librarians: evidence of their contribution to student literacy and learning | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
School libraries & teacher-librarians: evidence of their contribution to student literacy & learning by Hilary Hughes http://t.co/aMz1SrUciA

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lyn_hay's curator insight, September 2, 2013 7:35 PM

Highly recommended reading for all teacher librarians and principals. Thanks to Hilary Hughes at QUT and SLAQ for collaborating on this research project that provides solid local (Gold Coast) evidence of school library impact.

Audrey Nay's curator insight, September 9, 2013 6:40 AM

Looking forward to this article 

Bookmarking Librarian's curator insight, January 14, 2014 1:08 AM

Reading for TLs - advocacy

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15 Fabulous Bookish Pinterest Boards

15 Fabulous Bookish Pinterest Boards | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
There's a lot of bookish goodness out there in the vast Pinterest wasteland of oddly flavored cupcakes and questionable beauty secrets, but it's not always

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 28, 2013 1:12 PM

Here's an interesting way to expand your Personal Learning Network.

 

When there is so much to read about reading, why not take advantage of sites where others interested in various aspects of reading are already previewing, filtering, and recommending reading about reading materials?

 

I often wondered whether I was alone when I was still in the classroom and found it so difficult to keep up with what I perceived as a professional obligation to be reading about reading. 24/7 just never seemed enough time for Passion-based lesson planning, assessing student progress AUTHENTICALLY, constantly playing tug-of-war between wanting to do more for my own kids and wanting to do more for my students, and dealing with the perpetual exhaustion that is the biproduct of caring. 

 

I more often than not found myself lucky if I could get to one or two Language Arts conferences a year to at least get a megadose of new ideas. And, getting to a second one was extremely rare. 

 

And, I can't help but wonder if the passionate educators' "too-little-time-to-do-everything- that- is-too-important-to not-do" dilemma holds the seeds of a potential creeping stagnation over the course of a teaching career. 

 

These 15 Fabulous Booking Pinterest Boards are essentially pre-filtered sources for Quick Reads about Reading. Explore. 

 

There are many similar sources on www.Scoop.it where I keep my collection of scooped articles and commentaries about reading. Using the Scoop.it Search box quickly locates others who are  prefiltering interesting internet sites about reading and literature, like my Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading topic.

 

A quick tip about using the Scoop.it search function is that after you enter a search term, you will be shown a short list of relevant scoop.it collections. Those with stars to the right of the topics found have been updated recently. 

 

If you can find just enough time to explore the 15 Faboulous Bookish Pinterest Boards and spend a bit of time exploring Scoop.it collections, you'll surely find a few worthy of bookmarking. 

 

Find a few that are really "bang-for-the-buck-treasures" and check them out over your granola and first cup of coffee.

 

Then just consider them vitamin pills and see if you can stop by one or two of your favorites on a regular basis for a quick boost.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictional business name for GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

 

 

 

 

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10 Novels That Will Cure Your Social Ailments

10 Novels That Will Cure Your Social Ailments | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
At their heart, novels are about how people get on with one another - or fail to.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 27, 2013 12:36 PM

I'm not really a fan of oversimplifying literary merit by reducing it all to short lists purporting to have determined the best of the best or the worst of the worst as though individual variables among readers deserve no place in the criteria used to determine the list.  Literary Reading's benefits may come in a more complex mixture that can not be so simplistically determined. 

 

HOWEVER, it is of course interesting to be open to the values and benefits that might be engaging in books we have not read ourselves.

 

But this aside has actually been a digression of sorts. My real interest in this article is that it is not a list purporting to be the 10 Best Novels for preparing students for college and career or for preparing students to be globally competitive. It isn't  that these "trump cards" in the current educational reform conversation aren't important. It's that there are other benefits of literary reading that are just as important, and perhaps are at times quite a bit more important than the three trump cards.

 

Why is it that we can not pass gun control in a country where more than 70% of the citizenry wants some serious attention paid and they/we want it NOW?

 

Why is it that divorce rates are so high? Child abandonment and/or abuse is so high? So many people cause so much pain and suffering because of their anger management issues? Bullying is rampant among youth?

 

The list is immense, but perhaps at the heart of many of our social problems is that we are so focused upon criteria directly related to future economic success and security, important as they may be, that we are avoiding / ignoring / oblivious to the proverbial elephant in the room. We may be under-valuing the importance of educating our children in the area of being humane beings with an "e."

 

Our focus our attention upon preparing our students with skill sets important for what they want to do professionally, for example when we place significant attention on the importance of STEM education, we may be causing a de facto "trimming of attention" to the arts, whose benefit is often more impactful in their attention to contemplating what kind of persons we want to be in our equally if not more important roles as friend, parents, spouses, neighbors, and even as co-existing neighbors at the global level. 

 

We want our students to prepare to be good employees and productive citizens. And, developing the appropriate skill-sets for those roles should be important considerations in our curricula.

 

But we also ought to want to be having our students explore the great questions such as whether or not they really want to be bullies or mean girls; believers in fair-play or willing to side-step the social rules to gain personal advantage, global citizens or "we're-number-one-so-who-cares-about-them" xenophobes? Do we want our children to wonder whether the status quo is the best we can do or to question whether there is not only room for improvement, but also serious ongoing harm to many that should not be ignored any longer as a result of the blind acceptance of the status quo?

 

As to the article itself, I'm not certain that the author has nailed the true values of each of the recommended novels or explored the point at as admirable a depth as I was hoping for. Yet, pointing to the literary reading values of questioning whether one wants to be like the characters with better manners or the characters without manners, or to be like the thoughtful characters or the arrogant characters; or to participate in conversations with both our mouths and ears because we have much to contribute and much to learn or just with our mouths because we like to hear ourselves talk, but really aren't that interested in other's points of view. 

 

There are other social benefits mentioned in the article. Though had I an opportunity to tweak the article, I might suggest that literary reading als raises questions about our social responsibilities would have offered an even deeper insight into important areas "less attended to when the arts are left out or reduced to lip service in a curriculum design when STEM education is perceived as a de facto card.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

 

 

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Then-And-Now Photos Of Anne Frank's Amsterdam Will Stop You In Your Tracks

Then-And-Now Photos Of Anne Frank's Amsterdam Will Stop You In Your Tracks | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

While we've long been inspired by Frank's words, we've never before pored over images of the young heroine's life. That is, until we came across this then-and-now photography series, combining black-and-white photographs from Anne's lifetime with a contemporary image of the city streets. The jarring juxtaposition transports viewers to the Nazi-occupied Netherlands where Anne once lived in hiding. The ghostly shadows of young children and uniformed soldiers lingers over the modern tourist streets with an ominous and heartbreaking beauty."


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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, October 31, 2013 9:29 PM

We've all been duped by photoshopped images making sincere attempts to deceive us for profit without regard for honesty or the negative impact of such ideas as perpetuating among young women the belief that the impossibility of attaining the  "beauty" of photoshopped fashion models is not so much the ideal beauty as it is the standard by which they should judge themselves as "failures" lest they resort to faking beauty with expensive makeup and even surgery.

 

These manipulated images however, are not that brand of photoshopping, There is a clear intention to NOT fool the viewer at all. The blending of contemporary color images brought together with historical images from a very "unbeautiful" historical era amplify not only the horror of the holocaust but also with the world WE LIVE IN. It is the same world. We are not other people; we are the descendents of the people and like many of the historical people blended into the contemporary images, we too are living in times that future may look back upon and wonder why we did so little to right the wrongs that we are surrounded by. 

 

There are of course still geneocide-like travesties in places like Bosnia, Rwanda and Darfur. There are still horrific crimes against homosexuals. We do live in an almost numbly otherwise attentive times when gun violence is so common that we tsk-tsk and then finish our lattes. And, we live in times when issues such as global warming, economic collapse, and grid-locked politicians who do little beyond obstructing the efforts of their opponents continue to fool their constituents into re-electing them, and constituents continue to believe what they are promised by the very politicians who failed to keep their promises to anyone other than their financial backers.


And yet, we are for the most part good people. We do care. We are not happy with and are often outraged at those who do bad things and get away with it, who do manipulate the unwitting and profit from it, who do abuse children and abuse them again and again.

And in that truth there is another truth. And that truth is that our perception that we are the good guys may be the reason why we find it difficult to engage in the kind of introspection that bases our perception upon what we do do much more than upon what we do not do. 


Yesterday the Boston Red Sox won the world series. We have been abuzz aout the post league playoffs for several weeks. But, that will be old news within a few days. That's okay. The world series is entertainment. It really does not generate social obligation of much consequence. But, it wasn't that long ago in Boston that we were abuzz about a horrific bombing.and before than Sandy Hook and over 10,000 gun deaths in the US alone since Newtown. (see: http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/crime/2012/12/gun_death_tally_every_american_gun_death_since_newtown_sandy_hook_shooting.html) And, in spite of the outrage among good people in each case far too few have done far too little to address these issues. And, in each case, the outrage is too soon old news and off the front pages of our attentivness and our concern is reduced to tsk tsking.and fatalistic acceptance of our just being upset at what the bad people are doing.


When I look at these blended pictures of people of the time going about their business seemingly unconcerned about the immensity of the history of their own making, I wonder what those who look back on historical photos of our times will think given their perspective of the history we are making.


And I recall the words of Edmund Burke who said, "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing"

 

Anne Frank's Diary reminds us of the horrors of the holocaust. These photos remind us that what was then, may have familar echoes in our own times. And perhaps we ought to consider to what extent we are consumed in taking care of our business and to what extent we ought remember that "our" is plural.

 

It was the literary writing of Rudyard Kipling that brought us the phrase "Lest we Forget," a phrase adopted by many movements wanting to not repeat the horrors of the past.

 

I am also reminded of  the literary writing of Kurt Vonnegut in Cats Cradle when he had the American ambassador to the fictitious country of San Lorenzo give a speech on what was essentially San Lorenzo's Memorial Day. in a remarkably un-ambassadorial speech, Ambassador Minton said... ..

 

    "I do not say that children at war do not die like men, if they have to die. To their everlasting honor and our everlasting shame, the do die like men, thus making possible the manly jubilation of patriotic holidays.

  "But they are murdered children all the same..."

 

"...But if today is really in honor of a hundred children murdered in war," he said, "is today a dan for a thrilling show?

  "The answer is yes, ON ONE CONDITION; that we, the celebrants, are working consciously and tirelessly to reduce the stupidity and viciousness of ourselves and of all mankind."

 

Let we who consider ourselves the good guys, remember  our (plural) obligations to our world in our time and to our descendents  in their time, "Lest we forget."

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit.

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Books to Film: The Young Adult (YA) Lit Phenomenon ‹ Studio System News

Books to Film: The Young Adult (YA) Lit Phenomenon ‹ Studio System News | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

There are no less than 25 YA projects in some form of development - from script stage to pre-production - not to mention upcoming films Ender’s Game, The Seventh Son, The Maze Runner, Vampire Academy: Blood Sisters, and Divergent.  We take a good look at the YA films that have worked, which ones haven’t, and why Harry Potter was the first YA franchise to score at the box office.


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A Childhood Built on Banned Books - Bibliology

A Childhood Built on Banned Books - Bibliology | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
The banned books list is my "to-read" list. What part of education involves removing the choice of reading materials that might make someone uncomfortable,

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 26, 2013 10:45 AM

One of my favorite quotes from this article...

 

_______________

 

"I read sweet stories, too. I don't want to make you think that I was a glutton for punishment. It's just that the meaty books - the books that made me feel, the books that made me think, the ones that dealt with situations that I'd never personally experienced - were the most gratifying of them all. And those are the ones that people want to remove from library shelves."

_______________

 

Another regarding those who want to ban books...

 

_______________

 

"Most people are not willing to communicate about difficult things, which is the crux of the problem that results in people wanting to ban books. They don't want to think about difficult things, either because something happened to them, or because it is so far from their reality that they want to ignore it."

_______________

 

And one more...

 

_______________

 

"How can we hope to stop the horrors that humanity can wreak upon itself if we do not allow ourselves to notice that they exist, discuss the problems, and move past them together?"

_______________

 

The best literature engages us with plot and thereby we allow ourselves to discover and consider our responsibilities to each other for reducing the pain and suffering resulting from those who are foolish or evil.

 

I always believed that true optimism was not the Panglossian belief that everything is wonderful as it is. But rather, the optimism  of Mother Teresa and Martin Luther King jr. where the first knowing is knowing that there are serious problems that can be addressed and never losing faith that "something" can be done to reduce the chasm between the present and the perfect. 

 

As in...

We are NOT perfect.

There is SOMETHING we can do.

Reaching perfection is unlikely.

So the choice is leave it be as short of perfection as it is or don't.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

Susan Myburgh's curator insight, July 28, 2015 12:06 AM

add your insight ...

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Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming

Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
A lecture explaining why using our imaginations, and providing for others to use theirs, is an obligation for all citizens

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, October 20, 2013 10:35 AM

How many stars would I give this article if I had stars to give based upon value to teachers of literature? Perhaps a galaxy minus three.

 

Why minus three? There are extremely rare points at which I might have divergent thoughts. But they are so few that in counting the stars in a galaxy, subtracting a few is absolutely insignificant.

 

A preface:

Some of the most cherished moments in my teaching career were those when a student would suddenly blurt out what was to him or her a profound realization stimulated by a passage in a book we were reading.  Quite frequently, that student would blurt out his or her comment with such a wonderful blend of intellectual discovery and emotional delight that he or she would immediately "realize" and become a bit embarrassed about the display of personal engagement that he or she had shared so publicly and with such unrestrained delight.

 

Though frequently the outburst brought an almost immediate moment of embarrassment to the student, it always brought such an adrenalin rush of joy to me that I'd immediately attempt to deflect the embarrassment and help that student return to the joy of the unprecedented discovery he or she had made "all by him or herself." It was good to be reminded that concepts I'd discovered so long before and were no longer the source of such elation to me, were NEW and FRESH and WONDERFULLY JOYFUL to students when they FIRST ENCOUNTERED those ideas. 

 

I might put my hand over my heart as though it was pounding so much that I had to pause to regain some control of my own excitement at their discovery. If I felt it was safe, I might just say softly as I dropped my eyes, "Wow. I need a moment. (pause) to just marinate in the beauty of what you just said." And, I'd actually just go silent long enough for the students to witness me just "appreciating" the moment. Within seconds the entire class, including those who might have laughed at the student for having "lost control in public" and those who might have rolled their eyes at the the student's comment as having somehow made them look bad or as having not been worthy of admiration since they may have already "figured that out," while witnessing my reaction came to wonder about the beauty of wonder and the joys that life's "special moments of personal discovery" bring.

 

Over the years, my response, though always absolutely sincere, did become a bit of a theatrical piece. enough drama to emphasize my appreciation for the gift of being able to witness the moment of beauty of one of my student's personal discoveries and not so dramatic as to amplify the student's embarassment for having "forgotten him or herself" in the moment.

 

I'll leave it there and simply explain that as I read this transcript from a talk given by Neil Gaiman I was that student overwhelmed on so many ocassions  by its articulate  capturing of so many "ah ha" moments. Sometimes the "ah has"  were a result of new ideas; increasingly rare for a veteran literature teacher. Sometimes they were a result of the absolute freshness of Gaiman's take on ideas I'd been quite aware of for decades. And in that freshness, new facets and contemplations flowed in torrents.

 

So without further comment, I just want to drop a few of the points made to give you a taste. These are  a few of the incredible number of gems that make this such a great read.

 

Consider these gems... (CAPS are mine for emphasis since bold is not available in this medium)

 

_______________

...I'm going to suggest that reading fiction, that reading for PLEASURE, is one of the most important things one can do...

_______________

...I was once in New York, and I listened to a talk about the building of private prisons – a huge growth industry in America. The prison industry needs to plan its future growth – how many cells are they going to need? How many prisoners are there going to be, 15 years from now? And they found they could predict it very easily, using a pretty simple algorithm, based on asking what percentage of 10 and 11-year-olds couldn't read. And certainly COULD'NT READ FOR PLEASURE... 

_______________

...Fiction has two uses. Firstly, it's a GATEWAY DRUG TO READING. The drive to know what happens next, to want to turn the page, the need to keep going, even if it's hard, because someone's in trouble and you have to know how it's all going to end ... that's a very real drive. And it forces you to learn new words, to think new thoughts, to keep going. To discover that READING per se IS PLEASURABLE.  ONCE YOU LEARN THAT, YOU"RE ON THE ROAD TO READING EVERYTHING... .

_______________

...There are no bad authors for children, that children like and want to read and seek out, because every child is different. They can find the stories they need to, and they bring themselves to stories. A hackneyed, worn-out idea ISN'T hackneyed and worn out TO THEM. This is the first time the child has encountered it. Do not discourage children from reading because you feel they are reading the wrong thing. 

_______________

... WELL-MEANING ADULTS CAN EASILY DESTROY A CHILD'S LOVE OF READING: stop them reading what they enjoy, or give them worthy-but-dull books that you like, the 21st-century equivalents of Victorian "improving" literature. You'll wind up with a generation convinced that reading is uncool and worse, unpleasant...

_______________

...I'd like to say a few words about escapism. I hear the term bandied about as if it's a bad thing. AS IF "escapist" fiction is a cheap opiate used by the muddled and the foolish and the deluded, and the only fiction that is worthy, for adults or for children, is mimetic fiction, mirroring THE WORST of the world the reader finds herself in. 

_______________

...If you perceive a library as a shelf of books, it may seem antiquated or outdated in a world in which most, but not all, books in print exist digitally. BUT that is to miss the point fundamentally...

 

So it is unfortunate that, round the world, we observe local authorities seizing the opportunity to close libraries as an easy way to save money, without realising that they are STEALING FROM THE FUTURE TO PAY FOR TODAY. They are closing the gates that should be open.... 

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...One of the best cures for a reluctant reader, after all, is a tale they cannot stop themselves from reading...

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...Albert Einstein was asked once how we could make our children intelligent. His reply was both simple and wise. "If you want your children to be intelligent," he said, "read them fairy tales...

_______________

 

Hoping that these quotes inspire a desire to read the transcript, I'll just leave it to you to find your own gems and areas for professional and personal introspection.

 

I'm convinced that you will find it time well spent.

 

You might even find yourself unabashedly blurting out some of your own personal and professional realizations at your next faculty meeting.

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

Thierry Belleguic's curator insight, October 20, 2013 11:40 AM

A lecture explaining why using our imaginations, and providing for others to use theirs, is an obligation for all citizens. « 

It's important for people to tell you what side they are on and why, and whether they might be biased. A declaration of members' interests, of a sort. So, I am going to be talking to you about reading. I'm going to tell you that libraries are important. I'm going to suggest that reading fiction, that reading for pleasure, is one of the most important things one can do. I'm going to make an impassioned plea for people to understand what libraries and librarians are, and to preserve both of these things.

And I am biased, obviously and enormously: I'm an author, often an author of fiction. I write for children and for adults. For about 30 years I have been earning my living though my words, mostly by making things up and writing them down. It is obviously in my interest for people to read, for them to read fiction, for libraries and librarians to exist and help foster a love of reading and places in which reading can occur.

So I'm biased as a writer. But I am much, much more biased as a reader. And I am even more biased as a British citizen »

Fergus Puppy's curator insight, October 27, 2014 8:08 PM

Read this Scoopers!!

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A Childhood Built on Banned Books - Bibliology

A Childhood Built on Banned Books - Bibliology | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
The banned books list is my "to-read" list. What part of education involves removing the choice of reading materials that might make someone uncomfortable,

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 26, 2013 10:45 AM

One of my favorite quotes from this article...

 

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"I read sweet stories, too. I don't want to make you think that I was a glutton for punishment. It's just that the meaty books - the books that made me feel, the books that made me think, the ones that dealt with situations that I'd never personally experienced - were the most gratifying of them all. And those are the ones that people want to remove from library shelves."

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Another regarding those who want to ban books...

 

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"Most people are not willing to communicate about difficult things, which is the crux of the problem that results in people wanting to ban books. They don't want to think about difficult things, either because something happened to them, or because it is so far from their reality that they want to ignore it."

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And one more...

 

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"How can we hope to stop the horrors that humanity can wreak upon itself if we do not allow ourselves to notice that they exist, discuss the problems, and move past them together?"

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The best literature engages us with plot and thereby we allow ourselves to discover and consider our responsibilities to each other for reducing the pain and suffering resulting from those who are foolish or evil.

 

I always believed that true optimism was not the Panglossian belief that everything is wonderful as it is. But rather, the optimism  of Mother Teresa and Martin Luther King jr. where the first knowing is knowing that there are serious problems that can be addressed and never losing faith that "something" can be done to reduce the chasm between the present and the perfect. 

 

As in...

We are NOT perfect.

There is SOMETHING we can do.

Reaching perfection is unlikely.

So the choice is leave it be as short of perfection as it is or don't.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

Susan Myburgh's curator insight, July 28, 2015 12:06 AM

add your insight ...

Rescooped by Sharon Hayes from Curiosity + Skills = Knowledge
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100 Greatest Children's Books According To New York City Library - CBS Local

100 Greatest Children's Books According To New York City Library - CBS Local | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
100 Greatest Children's Books According To New York City Library CBS Local NEW YORK (AP) – Beloved authors Judy Blume and Eric Carle helped the New York Public Library celebrate children's literature Monday as the library released a list of 100...

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Banned Books Week: Celebrate the Right to Read

Banned Books Week: Celebrate the Right to Read | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

Since 1982, Banned Books Week offers an annual opportunity during the last week of September for librarians and other freedom fighters around the country to celebrate banned and challenged books, shine a spotlight on censorship, and honor those heroes working for open access to materials and the right to read for all.


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David Levithan's 'Two Boys Kissing': Book Review - Towleroad

David Levithan's 'Two Boys Kissing': Book Review - Towleroad | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

A kiss is always a story. But the kiss at the heart of David Levithan’s ambitious, humane, extraordinarily moving new novel is thirty-two hours long, and the story it tells is different from most.


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Rubrics for Teachers - Assessment

Rubrics for Teachers - Assessment | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
Rubrics for Assessment Information, Cooperative Learning, Research Process/Report, PowerPoint/Podcast, Oral Presentation, Web Page and Portfolio, Math, Art, Science, Video and Multimedia Project , Creating Rubrics, Writing, Rubrics for Primary Grades...
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Curation as learning in information literacy

Curation as learning in information literacy | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

Curation is not exactly a new concept for libraries; for centuries we have been selecting, organising and preserving information. However, the ability to curate content effectively is now demanded of virtually everyone in today's information rich environment.


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Stacey Py Flynn's curator insight, September 1, 2013 9:08 AM

So many interessting points in this article about how curation allows application of information literacy skills! 

Rescooped by Sharon Hayes from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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How and Why We Read: Crash Course English Literature #1

In which John Green kicks off the Crash Course Literature mini series with a reasonable set of questions. Why do we read? What's the point of reading critica...

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 15, 2013 12:26 PM

I've scooped John Green's videos before. But, here's another good one. 

 

Well worth considering clicking the subscribe button.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com

 

 "Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

 

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, August 15, 2013 5:57 PM

Excellent! Information presented in an informative, if somewhat frenetic method. Really gets into why reading matters in a most entertaining way. The original site is full of resources organised into grade appropriate categories.