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Maggie Stiefvater Talks New Novel ‘The Raven Boys,’ Fast Cars, and YA Fiction

Maggie Stiefvater Talks New Novel ‘The Raven Boys,’ Fast Cars, and YA Fiction | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

With her blockbuster new novel The Raven Boys racing up the charts, Maggie Stiefvater is poised to be the next big thing in YA publishing. She speaks to Doug Stanton about her love of very fast cars, mythology, and the Bulgarian bagpipes.

 

 


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School Libraries and their impact on student learning and reading
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Free QR Code Generator & Design QR Codes, Coupons, Tracking, Analytic

Create QR Codes with our free QR Code Generator or professional QR MGMT. Kaywa's QR MGMT offers Coupons, Custom Design and Facebook QR Codes, Tracking, Analytics.
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edtech VISION - Links

edtech VISION - Links | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
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edtech VISION - edtech VISION

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The 7 Most Powerful Ideas In Learning Available Right Now

The 7 Most Powerful Ideas In Learning Available Right Now | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
The 7 Most Powerful Ideas In Learning Available Right Now
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The 10 Biggest Educational Trends (And What Teachers Think) [Infographic]

The 10 Biggest Educational Trends (And What Teachers Think) [Infographic] | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
Do you know the ten biggest educational trends making the rounds today? What about how teachers feel about each?

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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 13, 2013 9:02 AM

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Infographic

 

Linda Alexander's comment, November 13, 2013 9:18 AM
The results are surprisingly positive. I think their sample size is too small to make these broad conclusions. 100 teachers isn't really a very significant group. I wonder if it was a random sampling or did they reach out to contacts? It just seems to inflated to me. Thanks so much for sharing, however, Gust. I would be interested in your thoughts....
Sanna Leinonen's curator insight, November 13, 2013 11:05 AM

Mitenhän olisi jos tällainen tehtäisiin Suomessa.

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Excellent Poster Featuring The 7 Essentials of Project Based Learning

Excellent Poster Featuring The 7 Essentials of Project Based Learning | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

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Christy P.Novack's curator insight, November 18, 2013 3:38 PM

To help assist when working with PBL's. 

Ian Fairhurst's curator insight, November 18, 2013 5:11 PM

Project Based Learning 7s - 7-Phases & 7 Essentials

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, November 19, 2013 5:45 AM

Great one.

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20 Classic YA Literature Heroines, Ranked - Flavorwire

20 Classic YA Literature Heroines, Ranked - Flavorwire | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

Here are 20 classic girl heroines of literature, ranked, from a 2013 vantage. Rules: I tried, with only a couple of exceptions, to stick to one character per oeuvre or author. I also didn’t worry too much about what my take on these girls might have been as a kid; just looking at their stories now, I came up with their advantages and disadvantages. Feel free to weigh in when you disagree with me!

 


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YA Historical Fiction for Downton Abbey Fans

YA Historical Fiction for Downton Abbey Fans | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
Although the U.S. premiere of Downton Abbey Season 4 isn’t until January 5, 2014, period drama fans can enjoy some YA historical fiction to tide you over in the mean time.

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BI Media Specialists's curator insight, November 1, 2013 4:01 PM

I love Downton Abbey! Checkout what YA historical fiction titles we have in our collection at http://lcssmedia.liberty.k12.ga.us/common/servlet/presenthomeform.do?l2m=Home&tm=Home&l2m=Home

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Gayle Forman: 'The stories rise up and demand to be told'

Gayle Forman: 'The stories rise up and demand to be told' | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

The bestselling author of If I Stay and Just One Year, her follow-up to Just One Day in which Allyson and Willem share one incredible day together in Paris before chance rips them apart, discusses her books and writing with site member bookworm 2002


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How Digital Learning Is Becoming The Fourth Lit...

How Digital Learning Is Becoming The Fourth Lit... | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
Reading. Writing. Math. Those are the big ones, right? Up until recently, a lot of people would have probably said that was correct. But since it is 2013 and so much of our lives happen online, digital literacy is being added to the list.
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Veronica Roth Explains Why Shocking 'Allegiant' Death Had To Happen - MTV.com

Veronica Roth Explains Why Shocking 'Allegiant' Death Had To Happen - MTV.com | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

"Allegiant" — the final installment of Veronica Roth's best-selling "Divergent" series — has been in readers' hands and on their Kindles for nearly a week now, meaning fans finally know the fate of heroine Tris Prior and her love, Tobias Eaton. The heart-wrenching conclusion no doubt surprised many — with fans galore taking to social media to cry, commiserate or complain about Roth's vision for the characters she so lovingly crafted over the trilogy.


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AASL's School Libraries Count! 2012 report [pdf]


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lyn_hay's curator insight, July 3, 2013 1:28 AM

Summary of the 2012 statistical results of the School Libraries Count longitudinal study on the status of American school libraries. The pdf of the published report is http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/researchandstatistics/slcsurvey/2012/AASL-SLC-2012-WEB.pdf

Keith Koehler's curator insight, September 8, 2013 8:37 PM

AASL always has great information.

 

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Should more YA fiction be read in schools?

Should more YA fiction be read in schools? | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

If there is anywhere that young adult literature should be read, it's schools. But more and more it seems that curriculums have to be followed, and books that could be relevant to teenagers (and, in a lot of cases, books altogether) are getting left behind.

 

 


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got books?

got books? | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
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edtech VISION - Resources

edtech VISION - Resources | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
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New Free Online learning tool encourages parent engagement in school libraries – Stephen's Lighthouse

New Free Online learning tool encourages parent engagement in school libraries – Stephen's Lighthouse | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
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Hana’s Suitcase: Unpacking Engaging Response Activities | Scholastic.com

Hana’s Suitcase: Unpacking Engaging Response Activities | Scholastic.com | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
Unpack engaging reading response activities for the award-winning text, Hana’s Suitcase.


 

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 23, 2013 12:58 PM

For those incorporating literatures about the Holocaust, this is interesting article on Hana's Suitcase by Karen Levine. 

 

There are links to several resources useful for the teaching of this award winning story.

 

And... there's also a Google Lit Trip developed by Kevin Amboe available on the Google Lit Trips site at: 

http://www.googlelittrips.com/GoogleLit/6-8/Entries/2008/5/10_Hanas_Suitcase_by_Karen_Levine.html

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

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Teacher knowledge for 21st century learning

Teacher knowledge for 21st century learning | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

This article offers a critical review of the literature on 21st century knowledge frameworks, with a particular focus on what this means for teachers and teacher educators.

 

The authors accomplish this by identifying common themes and knowledge domains in 15 reports, books, and articles that describe the kinds of knowledge that researchers state are integral and important for success in the 21st century.

 

The authors argue that seemingly disparate frameworks converge on three types of knowledge, as necessary for the 21st century: foundational, meta, and humanistic. Although 21st century frameworks are thought to advocate new types of knowledge, little has actually changed in the new century with respect to the overall goals of education.

 

Despite this sense of continuity, significant changes related to how technologies change all three types of knowledge need to be conveyed.

 

The article ends with specific conclusions and recommendations for teacher education.

 


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kelly levett's curator insight, November 16, 2013 4:00 PM

perfect for assignment one 

Charles Newton's curator insight, November 16, 2013 4:43 PM

This is a really important article - especially in its discussion around the importance of knowledge - an in seeing digital literacy as foundational knowledge.  I have found this article very useful!

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 16, 2013 7:45 PM

Education has always been a trans-disciplinary process that we have treated as a monolith and still do.

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Book & Movie Review: Austenland by Shannon Hale

Book & Movie Review: Austenland by Shannon Hale | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

I never seem to do things in the right order. I saw Austenland the movie, then after loving it so much, bought the book that evening. Here are my reviews for both the movie and the book.


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Best Opening Lines in Young Adult Books

Best Opening Lines in Young Adult Books | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
The first sentences of books set the tone for the entire novel and can grip readers or lose them right away – that’s why I love reading the best opening lines in YA books.

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'The Book Thief': The Reviews Are In! - MTV.com

'The Book Thief': The Reviews Are In! - MTV.com | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

Another week, another adaptation big-screen adaptation of a best-selling novel. This time it's Markus Zusak's 2006 young-adult tome "The Book Thief." With the film opening Friday, we look at what the critics have to say about director Brian Percival's adaptation.


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21st Century Technology Skills Are a Core Competency for Today’s Graduates

21st Century Technology Skills Are a Core Competency for Today’s Graduates | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
Our students need to be comfortable with the information technologies that are inextricably linked to the 21st century skills the work place requires, and teachers need to help pave the way.

Some of the skills commonly being cited as vital in today’s workforce include:

 

 

 

- The ability to communicate effectively orally and in writing (with almost all of today’s written communications in business being conducted digitally).

 

- Teamwork skills and the ability to collaborate with others in diverse groups settings (and information technologies are increasingly essential to many forms of organizational collaboration).

 

- The ability to innovate and be creative (today’s information technologies empower innovate and creative capabilities in ways not previously envisioned).

 

- The ability to locate, organize, and evaluate information from multiple sources.

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 12, 2013 10:21 AM

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.imls.gov/about/21st_century_skills_list.aspx

 

Andrew Jhons's comment, November 13, 2013 6:17 AM
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PILResearchIG.png (800x1500 pixels)

PILResearchIG.png (800x1500 pixels) | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
Check out the @UW Project Information Literacy infographic about uni students' research habits | http://t.co/m4zBTs5mL3 |
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10 Novels That Will Cure Your Social Ailments

10 Novels That Will Cure Your Social Ailments | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it
At their heart, novels are about how people get on with one another - or fail to.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 27, 2013 12:36 PM

I'm not really a fan of oversimplifying literary merit by reducing it all to short lists purporting to have determined the best of the best or the worst of the worst as though individual variables among readers deserve no place in the criteria used to determine the list.  Literary Reading's benefits may come in a more complex mixture that can not be so simplistically determined. 

 

HOWEVER, it is of course interesting to be open to the values and benefits that might be engaging in books we have not read ourselves.

 

But this aside has actually been a digression of sorts. My real interest in this article is that it is not a list purporting to be the 10 Best Novels for preparing students for college and career or for preparing students to be globally competitive. It isn't  that these "trump cards" in the current educational reform conversation aren't important. It's that there are other benefits of literary reading that are just as important, and perhaps are at times quite a bit more important than the three trump cards.

 

Why is it that we can not pass gun control in a country where more than 70% of the citizenry wants some serious attention paid and they/we want it NOW?

 

Why is it that divorce rates are so high? Child abandonment and/or abuse is so high? So many people cause so much pain and suffering because of their anger management issues? Bullying is rampant among youth?

 

The list is immense, but perhaps at the heart of many of our social problems is that we are so focused upon criteria directly related to future economic success and security, important as they may be, that we are avoiding / ignoring / oblivious to the proverbial elephant in the room. We may be under-valuing the importance of educating our children in the area of being humane beings with an "e."

 

Our focus our attention upon preparing our students with skill sets important for what they want to do professionally, for example when we place significant attention on the importance of STEM education, we may be causing a de facto "trimming of attention" to the arts, whose benefit is often more impactful in their attention to contemplating what kind of persons we want to be in our equally if not more important roles as friend, parents, spouses, neighbors, and even as co-existing neighbors at the global level. 

 

We want our students to prepare to be good employees and productive citizens. And, developing the appropriate skill-sets for those roles should be important considerations in our curricula.

 

But we also ought to want to be having our students explore the great questions such as whether or not they really want to be bullies or mean girls; believers in fair-play or willing to side-step the social rules to gain personal advantage, global citizens or "we're-number-one-so-who-cares-about-them" xenophobes? Do we want our children to wonder whether the status quo is the best we can do or to question whether there is not only room for improvement, but also serious ongoing harm to many that should not be ignored any longer as a result of the blind acceptance of the status quo?

 

As to the article itself, I'm not certain that the author has nailed the true values of each of the recommended novels or explored the point at as admirable a depth as I was hoping for. Yet, pointing to the literary reading values of questioning whether one wants to be like the characters with better manners or the characters without manners, or to be like the thoughtful characters or the arrogant characters; or to participate in conversations with both our mouths and ears because we have much to contribute and much to learn or just with our mouths because we like to hear ourselves talk, but really aren't that interested in other's points of view. 

 

There are other social benefits mentioned in the article. Though had I an opportunity to tweak the article, I might suggest that literary reading als raises questions about our social responsibilities would have offered an even deeper insight into important areas "less attended to when the arts are left out or reduced to lip service in a curriculum design when STEM education is perceived as a de facto card.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

 

 

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Then-And-Now Photos Of Anne Frank's Amsterdam Will Stop You In Your Tracks

Then-And-Now Photos Of Anne Frank's Amsterdam Will Stop You In Your Tracks | School Libraries make a difference | Scoop.it

While we've long been inspired by Frank's words, we've never before pored over images of the young heroine's life. That is, until we came across this then-and-now photography series, combining black-and-white photographs from Anne's lifetime with a contemporary image of the city streets. The jarring juxtaposition transports viewers to the Nazi-occupied Netherlands where Anne once lived in hiding. The ghostly shadows of young children and uniformed soldiers lingers over the modern tourist streets with an ominous and heartbreaking beauty."


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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, October 31, 2013 9:29 PM

We've all been duped by photoshopped images making sincere attempts to deceive us for profit without regard for honesty or the negative impact of such ideas as perpetuating among young women the belief that the impossibility of attaining the  "beauty" of photoshopped fashion models is not so much the ideal beauty as it is the standard by which they should judge themselves as "failures" lest they resort to faking beauty with expensive makeup and even surgery.

 

These manipulated images however, are not that brand of photoshopping, There is a clear intention to NOT fool the viewer at all. The blending of contemporary color images brought together with historical images from a very "unbeautiful" historical era amplify not only the horror of the holocaust but also with the world WE LIVE IN. It is the same world. We are not other people; we are the descendents of the people and like many of the historical people blended into the contemporary images, we too are living in times that future may look back upon and wonder why we did so little to right the wrongs that we are surrounded by. 

 

There are of course still geneocide-like travesties in places like Bosnia, Rwanda and Darfur. There are still horrific crimes against homosexuals. We do live in an almost numbly otherwise attentive times when gun violence is so common that we tsk-tsk and then finish our lattes. And, we live in times when issues such as global warming, economic collapse, and grid-locked politicians who do little beyond obstructing the efforts of their opponents continue to fool their constituents into re-electing them, and constituents continue to believe what they are promised by the very politicians who failed to keep their promises to anyone other than their financial backers.


And yet, we are for the most part good people. We do care. We are not happy with and are often outraged at those who do bad things and get away with it, who do manipulate the unwitting and profit from it, who do abuse children and abuse them again and again.

And in that truth there is another truth. And that truth is that our perception that we are the good guys may be the reason why we find it difficult to engage in the kind of introspection that bases our perception upon what we do do much more than upon what we do not do. 


Yesterday the Boston Red Sox won the world series. We have been abuzz aout the post league playoffs for several weeks. But, that will be old news within a few days. That's okay. The world series is entertainment. It really does not generate social obligation of much consequence. But, it wasn't that long ago in Boston that we were abuzz about a horrific bombing.and before than Sandy Hook and over 10,000 gun deaths in the US alone since Newtown. (see: http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/crime/2012/12/gun_death_tally_every_american_gun_death_since_newtown_sandy_hook_shooting.html) And, in spite of the outrage among good people in each case far too few have done far too little to address these issues. And, in each case, the outrage is too soon old news and off the front pages of our attentivness and our concern is reduced to tsk tsking.and fatalistic acceptance of our just being upset at what the bad people are doing.


When I look at these blended pictures of people of the time going about their business seemingly unconcerned about the immensity of the history of their own making, I wonder what those who look back on historical photos of our times will think given their perspective of the history we are making.


And I recall the words of Edmund Burke who said, "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing"

 

Anne Frank's Diary reminds us of the horrors of the holocaust. These photos remind us that what was then, may have familar echoes in our own times. And perhaps we ought to consider to what extent we are consumed in taking care of our business and to what extent we ought remember that "our" is plural.

 

It was the literary writing of Rudyard Kipling that brought us the phrase "Lest we Forget," a phrase adopted by many movements wanting to not repeat the horrors of the past.

 

I am also reminded of  the literary writing of Kurt Vonnegut in Cats Cradle when he had the American ambassador to the fictitious country of San Lorenzo give a speech on what was essentially San Lorenzo's Memorial Day. in a remarkably un-ambassadorial speech, Ambassador Minton said... ..

 

    "I do not say that children at war do not die like men, if they have to die. To their everlasting honor and our everlasting shame, the do die like men, thus making possible the manly jubilation of patriotic holidays.

  "But they are murdered children all the same..."

 

"...But if today is really in honor of a hundred children murdered in war," he said, "is today a dan for a thrilling show?

  "The answer is yes, ON ONE CONDITION; that we, the celebrants, are working consciously and tirelessly to reduce the stupidity and viciousness of ourselves and of all mankind."

 

Let we who consider ourselves the good guys, remember  our (plural) obligations to our world in our time and to our descendents  in their time, "Lest we forget."

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit.