School libraries for information literacy and learning!
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School libraries for information literacy and learning!
Curating topics around school libraries, information literacy, learning and learning environments.
Curated by Anu Ojaranta
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Rescooped by Anu Ojaranta from Empathy and Compassion
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Another use for literature: ability to understand others, a precursor of empathy

Another use for literature:  ability to understand others, a precursor of empathy | School libraries for information literacy and learning! | Scoop.it

Theory of mind' researchers find that reading serious fiction boosts one's ability to understand others, a precursor of empathy.

 

One thing that interests psychologists is the extent to which developing theory of mind is a precursor to the capacity for empathy. They are also looking at the way in which people with autism and sociopaths develop these abilities — or don't. And primatologists have demonstrated some of the rudiments of theory of mind in other apes.

Now, research by David Comer Kidd and Emanuele Castano of the New School for Social Research, published in the journal Science, suggests that reading literature improves these intuitive abilities. But not just any literature. Literature with a capital "L."




Via Edwin Rutsch
Anu Ojaranta's insight:

Reading enhances empathy skills in children...

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Carol Rine's curator insight, January 3, 2014 11:23 AM

This is the 2nd article I have read this past week about literature and its positive effects on the brain. Frank McCourt once said, "This is English. Queen of the Curriculum." I wholeheartedly agree. This article purports, "...may be the equivalent of aerobic exercise for the parts of your brain most involved in the theory-of-mind skills."

Rescooped by Anu Ojaranta from Coaching Leaders
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15 Reasons Why Daydreamers are Better Learners

15 Reasons Why Daydreamers are Better Learners | School libraries for information literacy and learning! | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, David Hain
Anu Ojaranta's insight:

"The daydream begins. It’s a familiar scene, one we have likely both experienced as students and struggled against in our students as teachers. But daydreaming is not what it might seem. Recent research in both psychology and neuroscience makes clear that daydreaming is an essential part of mental processing, reasoning and, yes, even learning."

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Belinda MJ.B's curator insight, January 9, 2013 6:58 AM

Let go of controlling your mind. Daydreaming is an attribute of successful people.

 

"Daydreaming, as a mental state activating both the default and executive networks of the brain, plays an important role in that organizing and processing. What you may think is just your mind drifting is actually your mind actively forming connections between information, synthesizing what was previously only chaos, and preparing the ground for the moment when things suddenly fit into place."

 

Increase your power of letting go with Equanimity at http://www.equanimityexecutive.com 

Eeva Kurttila-Matero's curator insight, January 9, 2013 12:30 PM

Thanks Anu and others, this was something I needed!

Trumans's curator insight, January 9, 2013 4:35 PM

Daydreamers are thinkers.  In order to stay in front of the competition one of the biggest challenges is "how?"  Thinkers may have the answer...

Rescooped by Anu Ojaranta from The Ischool library learningland
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Every School Needs a Library | James Dawson

Every School Needs a Library | James Dawson | School libraries for information literacy and learning! | Scoop.it
James Dawson, author of Hollow Pike.

Via Rosa Martins
Anu Ojaranta's insight:

Great advocacy for school libraries!

From the text:

"First the basics. Number one: the Internet is a swamp of contradictory shit, advertising, and ‘ask anything’ forums with spectacularly misleading information. Much fiction is dressed up as fact. Teachers (remember I was one for eight years) spend half their time teaching pupils how to find reliable sources online (which, to be fair, is a vital life skill), but providing them with quality non-fiction books would have probably taught them more about the subject they were researching. Number two: librarians are experts."

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Elizabeth Hutchinson's comment, January 28, 2013 12:30 PM
Well said! :)