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Bring Them Back Overdue Library Book Parody - YouTube

Let It Go parody. Overdue book video from 2013-2014.

Via Karen Bonanno, Mayra.Loves.Books
Chris Kiesow Vollmer's insight:

Will see what the other librarians think.......

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Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, August 30, 2014 10:59 AM

Funny! I will share it with our fifth graders on the first library day.

TheBookishBee's curator insight, August 31, 2014 11:21 AM

Gotta remember to play this at the end of the school year for book return!  Of course, they'll really be SICK of FROZEN by then!

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- The Things I Did That Stopped A Love of Reading

- The Things I Did That Stopped A Love of Reading | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 14, 2014 7:27 PM

Choice helps in reading.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Karen Draper's curator insight, November 17, 2014 3:29 PM

I am going to share with my English department.

Lucy Wyatt's curator insight, November 21, 2014 3:12 PM
It is worth thinking about the classroom practices that really energize readers; this article looks at many standard practices.
Rescooped by Chris Kiesow Vollmer from School Library Advocacy
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'School libraries play a huge part in pupils' education'

'School libraries play a huge part in pupils' education' | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it

In a society where one in three homes has no books owned by the children in them, it is essential that youngsters can find them elsewhere.

 

Recent research emphasises this importance. A study by the Institute of Education (2013) found reading for pleasure ‘to be more important for children's cognitive development between ages 10 and 16 than their parents' level of education.’


Via Karen Bonanno
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Jessica Billeci's curator insight, November 5, 2014 12:41 AM

"In a society where one in three homes has no books owned by the children in them..." Wow this statement makes me sad, but the article is hopeful.

Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, November 9, 2014 7:15 PM

Perfectly written.

Lauli Mulinganiza's curator insight, November 10, 2014 3:19 AM

lets us cooperate to make sure that students are getting information in library without problem

Rescooped by Chris Kiesow Vollmer from Reading + Children
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Literacy, families and learning: Getting Boys Excited About Reading: Ideas & Resources

Literacy, families and learning: Getting Boys Excited About Reading: Ideas & Resources | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it

Via C Hertel
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C Hertel's curator insight, August 1, 2014 7:33 AM

As someone who read to both their son and daughter every day, I cannot emphasize enough how important it is and what a difference it makes in their lives, including enriching their vocabulary and ability to express themselves coherently at a young age.

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Book Week 2014: Connect to Reading by Connecting Dots!

Book Week 2014: Connect to Reading by Connecting Dots! | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it
Book Week 2014: Connect to Reading by Connecting Dots!
I’ve been a fan of the Thomas Pavitte’s ‘1000 Dot-to-Dot’ books for some time now. I believe they are the perfect gift for anyone - youn

Via Melinda Strickland
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Rescooped by Chris Kiesow Vollmer from Reading discovery
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23 of the most creatively designed Little Free Libraries

23 of the most creatively designed Little Free Libraries | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it
The builders of these Little Free Libraries went above and beyond to make their pop-up book nooks stand out!

Via Sharon Furlong
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Perhaps some day.....

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Rescooped by Chris Kiesow Vollmer from In the Library and out in the world
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How do you keep up? Part 1: slideshare & authorSTREAM — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch

How do you keep up? Part 1: slideshare & authorSTREAM — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it

Via Mayra.Loves.Books
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Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, August 23, 2014 9:15 AM

 NeverEnding Learning.

Rescooped by Chris Kiesow Vollmer from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Travel the (Google Maps) World with Literary Characters!

Travel the (Google Maps) World with Literary Characters! | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it
If you're looking for a way to incorporate STEM concepts and Common Core concepts into your k-12 fiction lesson, look no further. Our Research and Instruction Librarian, Kim Miller, found an excell...

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 18, 2014 1:52 PM

29 July 2014

 

Short and sweet but always an honor to be recognized favorably by University Librarians and Colleges of Education.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

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No Devices, No Talking...Just Silence and Reading - YouTube

Maybe it's time to try this ....


Via Suzanne Hamilton
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'School libraries play a huge part in pupils' education'

'School libraries play a huge part in pupils' education' | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it

In a society where one in three homes has no books owned by the children in them, it is essential that youngsters can find them elsewhere.

 

Recent research emphasises this importance. A study by the Institute of Education (2013) found reading for pleasure ‘to be more important for children's cognitive development between ages 10 and 16 than their parents' level of education.’


Via Karen Bonanno
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Jessica Billeci's curator insight, November 5, 2014 12:41 AM

"In a society where one in three homes has no books owned by the children in them..." Wow this statement makes me sad, but the article is hopeful.

Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, November 9, 2014 7:15 PM

Perfectly written.

Lauli Mulinganiza's curator insight, November 10, 2014 3:19 AM

lets us cooperate to make sure that students are getting information in library without problem

Rescooped by Chris Kiesow Vollmer from School Library Advocacy
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Teacher librarians roles | Pinterest

Teacher librarians roles | Pinterest | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it
Teacher Librarian Roles by Deb Schiano

Via Karen Bonanno
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Tricia Adams's curator insight, October 22, 2014 9:06 AM

More advocacy on why we need good school librarians

Rescooped by Chris Kiesow Vollmer from In the Library and out in the world
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Bring Them Back Overdue Library Book Parody - YouTube

Let It Go parody. Overdue book video from 2013-2014.

Via Karen Bonanno, Mayra.Loves.Books
Chris Kiesow Vollmer's insight:

Will see what the other librarians think.......

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Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, August 30, 2014 10:59 AM

Funny! I will share it with our fifth graders on the first library day.

TheBookishBee's curator insight, August 31, 2014 11:21 AM

Gotta remember to play this at the end of the school year for book return!  Of course, they'll really be SICK of FROZEN by then!

Rescooped by Chris Kiesow Vollmer from School Libraries around the world
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Public Library Tries to Bring Readers Back From the Internet With Billboards

Public Library Tries to Bring Readers Back From the Internet With Billboards | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it

Using social media 'visuals' to advocate school libraries :-)


Via Lourense Das
Chris Kiesow Vollmer's insight:

This is from awhile ago but I just found it now on Scoop.it!  Clever marketing MPL.

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Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, June 1, 2014 5:56 PM

Very clever MPL! Now let's get that campaign everywhere!

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What makes us stop reading a book?

What makes us stop reading a book? | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it

GoodReads has some ideas about that....


Via Suzanne Hamilton
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Rescooped by Chris Kiesow Vollmer from In the Library and out in the world
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Does Your School Have a Teacher Librarian? A CSLA Film - YouTube

This advocacy film about California teacher librarians illustrates how we nurture student interests, integrate technology, teach information literacy, prepar...

Via Mayra.Loves.Books
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Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, November 10, 2014 10:52 PM

Very well put together! I'm glad to see website evaluation  tips I teach our fifth grade students!

Rescooped by Chris Kiesow Vollmer from K-12 School Libraries
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New Efficient Social Media Librarian: 10+ Awesome Resources to Populate Library Social Media – Stephen's Lighthouse

New Efficient Social Media Librarian: 10+ Awesome Resources to Populate Library Social Media – Stephen's Lighthouse | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, October 23, 2014 4:49 PM

Great list of social media sources for the "lazy" librarian - not really lazy but it sure is nice to find a list like this already compiled! Visit the website and thank Stephen Abrams for the info!

Natarsha Miller's curator insight, October 24, 2014 8:22 PM

Thanks for this article!

Karen E Smith's curator insight, October 25, 2014 7:59 AM

Great resources.

Rescooped by Chris Kiesow Vollmer from Mary MacKillop Books and Reading
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Book Week 2014: Connect to Reading by Connecting Dots!

Book Week 2014: Connect to Reading by Connecting Dots! | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it
Book Week 2014: Connect to Reading by Connecting Dots!
I’ve been a fan of the Thomas Pavitte’s ‘1000 Dot-to-Dot’ books for some time now. I believe they are the perfect gift for anyone - youn

Via Melinda Strickland
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Rescooped by Chris Kiesow Vollmer from Reading discovery
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Best Illustrated Books

Best Illustrated Books | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it
The New York Times Best Illustrated Children’s Books of 2014, with sample artwork from each.

Via Sharon Furlong
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Some interesting choices.

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Book Scavenger Hunt Printables | My Little Bookcase

Book Scavenger Hunt Printables | My Little Bookcase | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it

Via Melinda Strickland
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Easy to modify for grade levels.....

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6 Reasons Why Print Books Will Always Be Better

6 Reasons Why Print Books Will Always Be Better | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it
Surprise, surprise. Literary writers prefer print....

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 23, 2014 1:23 PM

23 August 2014

 

One simple question. Would you consider using this article in class as an excellent example of "Informational Reading"?

 

I might, but not for the reasons you might expect.

 

__________

A PREFACE:  A clarification. It is not my intent to counter the pro-print and anti-E-book positions taken in this article. My intent is to call into question the tact taken by the article's writer (henceforth referencing the writer of the article in order to distinguish the article's author from the book authors referenced in the article).Had the author used the same tact, with the exception of presenting only evidence gleaned from pro-eBook writers, I would certainly have had as much to be concerned about  regarding its lack of balance.

__________

 

I might use this article as an exercise in determining when "informational reading represents an example of a writer being informed, misinformed, disinformed, or ill-informed.

 

My intent was to reference the writer of the article, however I suppose that it might also reference the authors who are the subject of the article as well.

 

My concerns...

 • The article's title is misleading. I had hoped that the writer might be writing an article representing a cross-section of authors who have preferences for reading traditional print or E-Books. 

 

__________

AN INTERESTING SIDEBAR: The previous comment refers to the title on the article as it was published on The Huffington Post (Click to the article above to see for yourself). When "scooped" for this blog, the title mysteriously changed to "6 Reasons why Print Books Will Always be Better." Having done my fair share of print production, I know that headlines are generally not the work of an article's author, but rather the product of the page layout person. The headline as published on The Huffington Post is misleading; the headline that appears at the top of this blog is at least more honest in that it does not hide the writer's bias.

__________

 

I've long had concerns about teachers who express to their students a preference (or skeptical opinion) of either format. Well intended as it may be, it is a personal opinion being passed off as an informed opinion. And, we live in a world where many, if not most, students from every ability level are still too often focused upon reflecting what they believe to be what the teacher wants them to believe, whether they do or not, is going to be on the test (or appreciated by the person who will eventually be handing out grades). Those who prefer "the other" media for their reading may well come to one of two conclusions; either perceiving themselves as in a minority of those "less respected" by the teacher or, in a class with a clueless teacher. This is disturbing in light of our goal of encouraging all students to value the wisdom articulated in great works of literature.

 

 • The writer then begins by clarifying the fact that the authors of whom she writes all share a particular grudge against Amazon, the major distributor of digital text. Their grudge, which may well be justified, is primarily based upon Amazon's policy of not making available books written by authors whose works are also sold by Amazon's primary competitor, Hachette. I suppose this is a reasonable concern since the  Amazon policy does punish the authors by reducing the distribution of their work. The authors become the rope being dragged through the mud in the tug-o-war between two corporations. So, unfair as it appears to be, the question is can authors be unbiased when asked about their preferences for reading media? I don't know. 

 

 • In spite of the headline's appearance of an implied promise to be fair and balanced, the writer clarifies in bold, but buried, text that her article will only represent authors who favor traditional print over digital media. 

 

Those authors articulate the traditional arguments in favor of traditional print, many of which are reasons that my own reading habits sometimes includes traditional print. I do love the ambiance that the wall of books in my den brings to the room. I do appreciate the feel of a book in my hands, the smell of an old book as I read an old classic. I like the "lendability" of printed books, (though I suppose that isn't a preference for many authors who would rather every reader by his or her own copy).

 

 • Another concern is that there is a common "jump to the conclusion" that authors have some special expertise on the subject. 

 

They may have some degree of expertise on quality of an author's writing. Though examples of famous author's distaste for other famous authors abound. (see: The 30 Harshest author on author insults in History: http://flavorwire.com/188138/the-30-harshest-author-on-author-insults-in-history)

 

It's pretty clear to anyone who happens to prefer E-Book reading that some of these authors are in fact ill -informed or inadequately experienced about reading E-Books. 

 

For example, like Lev Grossman, I too want to leave my kids a roomful of books, but reducing the act of reading E-books to "a chunk of plastic that they (the kids) have to guess the password to" would not pass muster in my class for representing an argument objectively. 

And, I don't even get the intent of his quoting Maurice Sendak's suggestion that there is a parallel between reading books and sex having only one kind PERIOD. Absurd. One of the most exciting trends in creating reading materials is the exploration being done by authors of many new concepts in packaging books.

 

Emma Straub, begins with her confession that she's never read an e-book. Well, I'd rather hear the opinions of authors who have invested time in learning a bit about the subject they have taken a very strong opinion about. I do agree with her that I don't find reading on my phone to be a preferable mode of reading. But, to suggest that reading on a phone is a counter argument of much value, in spite of the distinct differences between reading e-books on a phone and reading e-books on other devices. 

 

Anthony Doerr. If you feel that way, fine. Sometimes I have similar, but less intense preferences. However, having also spent a lot of time on my iPad I've come to understand that e-book modes of letting me know where I am in the book are pretty easy to get used to and have some distinct advantages. I would not have an opposing view if he'd indicated that he has issues with the difficulty of referencing pagination since unlike print books, pagination varies in e-books dependent upon font size options they have which brings both the consistent pagination problems but also the benefit of being able to adjust visual comfort. And, if his reference to making "scribbles of my passage" refers to the delightful activity of highlighting text and creating marginalia, Well, e-books beat the pants off of printed books, ah, IN MY OPINION.

 

And, his concern about the irritation he feels when getting "alerts blooming across the page announcing that it's your turn in Words With Friends," as clever as it seems at first indicates that he must not have phones that ring or an awareness of the preferences for controlling alerts  on digital devices. 

 

I must say that I was much less concerned about the comments of the last three authors included in this article.

Sue Monk Kidd presents her pro-print opinions without having to counterbalance them with questionably ill-informed opinions about e-book reading.

 

Elizabeth McCracken also restricts her comments to very specific reasons why she prefers print over e-Books in that dropping a paper book while reading in the bathtub is much less of a problem than dropping one's iPad while bathing. And, coffee spills and small children? Yes, these are arguments that with the exception of simply being careful, are understandable concerns.

 

Karen Russell prefers print over e-Books but makes the most sensible statement when she recognizes that "But writing an e-book has been an exciting experiment; it's the way so many people read now. [Print versus e-books] is sort of a funny rivalry."


The problem she mentions about feeling like a dinosaur for her preference is intriguing. I would hope that one's reading preferences would NOT make one feel like an outcast. Though, those of us with some concern about sustainability issues relating to the consumption of paper might feel a bit more concerned about the matter. 

 

But, with that exception, what is the advantage in a classroom of a teacher expressing his or her preference as though students with the "other preference" are outcasts and in an indefensible position?

 

Reading preferences are not like elections where one side wins if it can demonstrate a majority approval. The real "winners" are those who prefer reading regardless of preference for means of access.

 

 Our personal preferences in reading format are personal.

 

On the other hand, our professional preferences in reading format ought to be in promoting whatever means of accessing the great stories that each of our students find most engaging. This might simply be a recognition that individualizing our lesson design should consider THEIR reading access preferences not ours.

 

And, by the way, check out the graphic used to illustrate the article. A chalk board????? 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

Sarah McElrath's curator insight, September 9, 2014 4:22 PM

Interesting points by Google-lit-trips.

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15 Lesson Plans For Making Students Better Online Researchers ~ Global Digital Citizen Foundation

15 Lesson Plans For Making Students Better Online Researchers ~ Global Digital Citizen Foundation | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it

"Google is usually one of the first places students turn to when tasked with an assignment. Whether it’s for research, real-time results, or just a little digital exploration … it’s important they know how to properly Google. Lucky for teachers (and students, of course), Google has a handy set of lesson plans that are just waiting to be unleashed upon the leaders of tomorrow.

 

"While I understand there’s a LOT more to research than just Googling, it’s important to note that this is where nearly all students start their research. Therefore, it’s a critical skill if they’re going to start down the right paths.

 

"Below are 15 lesson plans courtesy of Google designed to make students better online researchers. They’re organized by difficulty and meant to help students (and everyone) become better online searchers."


Via Jim Lerman
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Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:30 PM

Excellent lessons. Must be used.

Deborah Fillman's curator insight, December 15, 2014 8:47 PM

This is a pet peeve of mine--schools are still not teaching kids how to do this properly, with disastrous results. Whether you homeschool or send a child to school, these lessons will help them use the Internet more effectively (and responsibly) for research projects. 

Tanyam's curator insight, February 23, 5:10 PM

I have not read all of this, but I have seen some ideas in here we could use in both our face to face and online teaching. Interesting to read the criteria Google use to evaluate resources

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Six Alternatives to Book Reports | Education Rethink

Six Alternatives to Book Reports | Education Rethink | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it

Via Alexandra Duarte
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Rescooped by Chris Kiesow Vollmer from School Library Advocacy
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School Libraries Matter: The Changing Role of the School Librarian - YouTube

Support over 50,000 school librarians making a difference every day in our schools. Join the conversation. #SchoolLibrariesMatter

Via Karen Bonanno
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"All About Those Books" MDIHS Library - YouTube

The Mount Desert Island High School version of Meghan Trainor's "All About The Bass".  A little fun from Downeast Maine!


Via Suzanne Hamilton
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Fun way to promote .....

 

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How Cuts and Closures of Elementary School Libraries Are Hurting Our Kids

How Cuts and Closures of Elementary School Libraries Are Hurting Our Kids | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it
From Los Angeles to New York City, budget cuts are affecting public school libraries.

Via Karen Bonanno
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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, March 1, 2014 5:01 PM

Some startling statistics and related posts that given an indication of the impact of closing school libraries. 

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School Libraries Count! | American Association of School Librarians (AASL)

School Libraries Count! | American Association of School Librarians (AASL) | School libraries are vital | Scoop.it
School Libraries Count! survey

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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, January 15, 2013 3:49 PM

Five years of collated survey results.

Anita Vance's curator insight, January 28, 2013 8:28 AM

Continuing to prove that a good program makes a difference!