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Common Craft Explains Primary and Secondary Sources

Common Craft Explains Primary and Secondary Sources | School Libraries and more | Scoop.it

"Understanding the differences between primary and secondary sources can be a challenge to some middle school and high school students. "


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 1, 2014 9:10 PM

Help your student learn the differences between primary and seconary sources by sharing this video by Common Craft. What makes primary resources important? When it is better to use secondary resources? How to they interact with each other? This two minute video will provide an overview that will help your students deepen their understanding. 

Rescooped by Kris McGlaun from Information and digital literacy in education via the digital path
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Research Article: “Why Some Students Continue to Value Individual, Face-to-Face Research Consultations in a Technology-Rich World” | LJ INFOdocket

Research Article: “Why Some Students Continue to Value Individual, Face-to-Face Research Consultations in a Technology-Rich World” | LJ INFOdocket | School Libraries and more | Scoop.it

For decades, academic librarians have provided individual research consultations for students. There is little information, however, about why students schedule consultations, the kinds of assistance students feel are provided by librarians during consultations, and what students find valuable about face-to-face consultations, even with the availability of online research help. This exploratory, qualitative study of individual research consultations at the University of Vermont gathered students’ views on these questions. The findings will help librarians better understand how individual consultations serve students and what role consultations should play in the mix of reference services offered.


Via Elizabeth E Charles
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"How To Do Research" Game

"How To Do Research" Game | School Libraries and more | Scoop.it
"How To Do Research" game is presented by Kentucky Virtual Library. It's designed for kids to learn how to do research independently with kids-friendly user experience. Did you know that you can ac...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 24, 2014 12:37 PM

A Game for the children :)

Lotte Schacht's curator insight, September 14, 2014 7:09 AM

Great stuff.

larcher's curator insight, October 19, 2014 11:07 AM

ajouter votre point de vue ...

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Teaching Students How to Research for Understanding with Technology

Teaching Students How to Research for Understanding with Technology | School Libraries and more | Scoop.it
Searching for information on the Internet can be extremely challenging for our students. This is widely due to the sheer amount of information that is currently available out there. A lot of teache...

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 1, 2014 8:58 PM

You assign students a research project. Many students go to Google, type in a question (without giving much thought), and often become overwhelmed with the amount of information available. Is this a familiar scene?

Think back and make one change, instead of using Google have them use a database? Is that a significant shift?

This post provides a series of steps, taking you through a number of ways you might proceed with a research project and adding in complexity. Scheer begins by explaining a common research project and moves on through a number of areas:

* What is understanding?

* Understanding Searching with Technology

* Stages of Research

* Putting This All Together

* Conclusion

Do you have your students do research projects? Do you find that you are not satisfied with the quality of work being done? This post provides an excellent foundation to help you revamp your process and provide your students with skills that they will use not only in the classroom but also in the future, in both their personal and professional endeavors.

Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, April 7, 2014 2:20 PM

Re-framing the stages of research to help students manage the volume of information on databases and the internet.

PLAN – Identify what the problem is and the questions that you are going to ask.

STRATEGIZE – The route that you are going to take to search the web for information about your questions.

EVALUATE –  The sources of data that you are  using for credibility, accuracy and currentness.

TRIANGULATE – Compare your sources of data against one other.

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Children's Media Use in America 2013 Infographic

Children's Media Use in America 2013 Infographic | School Libraries and more | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 29, 2013 9:34 PM

Common Sense Media has just published an infographic and a report that looks at how children ages 8 and under are using media. They did a similar report two years ago so you will see some major shifts in how current technology is being used.

Areas covered in the infographic include:

* Access to mobile technology

* Tech savvy toddlers

* Screen time

* What kid's are doing with mobile devices

* Television time

* Digital Divide

and more. There continues to be debate over how much screen time is appropriate for young ones. This infographic may provide some information that surprises you. To access the summary or the full report, "Zero to Eight: Children's Media Use in America 2013"

http://www.commonsensemedia.org/research