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Rebranding Removes the Term Library

Rebranding Removes the Term Library | School Librarians | Scoop.it

TAt the risk of sounding like I’m bragging, I knew this was coming when I wrote The Revolutionary Library in April of 2011, and again in August with The Physics of Your Library Brand.


Via Dr. Steve Matthews
LibrarianLand's insight:

This is really b.s. The term library and it associations are still very important and vital to the institution in most of its forms. "Digital Idea Space" or "Ideal Village"  or "You can make it happen here!" or what ever the heck you want to rebrand it does not convey the wonderful history and values that make libraries great and sound trendy and hollow.

 

I agree that libraries need to be marketed better and often times differently but just as importantly they need to hire and retain the best and brightest who will actively provide and support the creation of new knowledge. A trendy new name that obliterates a very powerful concept in many folks' minds, LIBRARY, does not do the history or values of the idea justice. Perhaps a hybrid name that involves both is OK, like "Library Resource Center" or "Digital Learning Library" or even a name that does not include the word but clearly markets the traditional values of intellectual freedom, equity, learning, and yes, still preserving and collecting traditional things like books.

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toraki's curator insight, February 27, 10:29 AM

Let' s stop saying "museum", "book", school"... Is this the issue for 21st century?

Karen du Toit's comment, February 28, 1:05 AM
Changing the name to incorporate all the new functions /spaces/services the "library" offers! To get past the stereotypical idea of a "library" with only books and a quiet place of study!
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 1, 2:19 AM
Rebranding Removes the Term Library
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Concept Mapping/Graphic Organizers

Concept Mapping/Graphic Organizers | School Librarians | Scoop.it

"Reading Rockets shares that "A concept map is a visual organizer that can enrich students' understanding of a new concept. Using a graphic organizer, students think about the concept in several ways. Most concept map organizers engage students in answering questions such as, "What is it? What is it like? What are some examples?" Concept maps deepen understanding and comprehension."Cast reports: "There is solid evidence for the effectiveness of graphic organizers in facilitating learning." A summary of this finding is that, "When looking across 23 different studies they found a consistent effect on comprehension."



Via Beth Dichter
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, August 20, 8:41 AM

Some great links in this article to a plethora of resources. 

Sample Student's curator insight, August 20, 5:15 PM

Of great use when making decisions about supporting higher order thinking in assisted learning.

Edgar Mata's curator insight, Today, 8:57 PM

A concept map is a visual organizer that can enrich students' understanding of a new concept.

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10 OER resources every educator should know about - eCampus News

10 OER resources every educator should know about - eCampus News | School Librarians | Scoop.it
As textbook prices soar, tuition skyrockets, and educators need to provide innovative courses the open education movement and its OERs are critical.

Via John Shank
LibrarianLand's insight:

As I plan a year-long school-wide IL course, I imagine (hope) some of these lessons will come in handy...

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What I Said When They Came for THE HANDMAID'S TALE - BOOK RIOT

What I Said When They Came for THE HANDMAID'S TALE - BOOK RIOT | School Librarians | Scoop.it
I had the chance, once, to put my money where my mouth was. This is what I said when they challenged my teaching of THE HANDMAID'S TALE.

Via Jennifer Cowley
LibrarianLand's insight:

 A very important book and a description of a teacher's response to a request to censor it.

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10 top indigenous books for your summer reading list

10 top indigenous books for your summer reading list | School Librarians | Scoop.it
If you are looking for summer reading suggestions, you are in luck. Check out 10 new releases by indigenous authors, brought to you by the editors of Muskrat Magazine — from fiction to non-fiction, poetic prose, science, politics, romance and traditional stories.

Via Jennifer Cowley
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What is the World Wide Web? TED-Ed

What is the World Wide Web? TED-Ed | School Librarians | Scoop.it
The World Wide Web is used every day by millions of people for
everything from checking the weather to sharing cat videos. But what is
it exactly? Twila Camp describes this interconnected information system
as a virtual city that everyone owns and explains how it’s organized
in a way that mimics our brain’s natural way of thinking.

Via Beth Dichter
LibrarianLand's insight:

This is a short, fairly concise video explaining the world wide web. It delineates the difference between the web and the internet and briefly touches on servers, languages and more. Simple and elegant.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 18, 5:59 PM

Once again TED-Ed hits a home run in explaining a complex concept simply. This video, which looks at the World Wide Web will help students understand the difference between the World Wide Web and the Internet as well as teaching them about how hyperlinks mimic the way our brains learn and much more. As always you will find a quiz, additional resources and an online forum/

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25 Essential Graphic Novels

25 Essential Graphic Novels | School Librarians | Scoop.it
Long dismissed as a less serious art form, graphic novels have finally started to gain more mainstream credibility over the last 20 years. There are many, many excellent examples out there, but if ...

Via Clare Treloar
LibrarianLand's insight:

Graphic novels seem to be a great addition to the high school library I work at.

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Clare Treloar's curator insight, April 22, 10:22 PM

A list to explore!

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Growth vs Fixed Mindset - YouTube

A video that explains the difference between a person who has a growth mindset and person who has a fixed mindset. All design and animation was done by me. A...

Via Beth Dichter
LibrarianLand's insight:

Slick but effective video illustrating the difference between a fixed, less conducive to learning mindset and the more open, growth-oriented type of outlook.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 22, 6:13 PM

This short video does a great job comparing Growth Mindset and Fixed Mindset. You can find additional resources about mindset at a post Musing on Mindsets located at http://insidetheclassroomoutsidethebox.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/musings-on-mindset

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Information Literacy Theory - Information Literacy - LibGuides at City University London

Information Literacy Theory - Information Literacy - LibGuides at City University London | School Librarians | Scoop.it
This guide has a dual purpose. It is a subject guide for those interested in IL as part of studying Library & Information Management. It also outlines why IL is important for staff & students and what support the Library can offer at City Overview of theory for IL practitioners

Via Elizabeth E Charles
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Anita Vance's curator insight, April 20, 4:49 AM

Thank you Elizabeth, this a good visual for guiding the development of skillful searching.

Eeva Kurttila-Matero's curator insight, May 3, 8:07 AM
ANCIL: A New Curriculum for Information Literacy.
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How to Infuse Digital Literacy Throughout the Curriculum

How to Infuse Digital Literacy Throughout the Curriculum | School Librarians | Scoop.it

In our emerging digital world, a new medium of exchange has developed: online engagement, especially via social media. Effectively engaging online requires a myriad of skills that we strive to foster in school – effective written communication, brevity and civility. These components are often highlighted in Digital Citizenship programs, but in tradition-bound K12 education, we often deride social media as trite or ineffective.


Via Nik Peachey
LibrarianLand's insight:

Many students still do not understand the limitations of finding information on the free web. Google is about the extent of it and if it isn't found in the first few results, it does not exist or is too hard to find (or worse still, what is found must be "it.").

 

From article: "We need to ensure that they know how to evaluate a website, a blog post, a tweet, a Facebook entry. These evaluative skills transfer cross curricularly and prepare students for the broader world of online communication."

 

 

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Sandra Carswell's curator insight, April 2, 11:09 AM

Of course, the librarian is in the position to help teachers infuse digital literacy into student projects. 

John McDermott Neill's curator insight, April 3, 9:17 AM

Interesting post with good ideas.

Antonis Michailidis's curator insight, April 26, 2:49 AM

Πώς εξελίσσεται η διδακτική πράξη.

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How to Infuse Digital Literacy Throughout the Curriculum

How to Infuse Digital Literacy Throughout the Curriculum | School Librarians | Scoop.it

"So how are we doing on the push to teach “digital literacy” across the K12 school spectrum? From my perspective as a school-based technology coach and history teacher, I’d say not as well as we might wish – in part because our traditional approach to curriculum and instruction wants to sort everything into its place."

 


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 27, 6:14 PM

How often have you heard the term digital native or digital immigrant? Are our students digital natives because they were born after digital items were widely available? Does this factor mean that they understand how to use these tools effectively and that they are digitally literate? For me the answer to that is that they do not fully understand how to use digital tools effectively and they are not digitally literate. This is something we need to teach them.

This post does an excellent job looking at this issue. Specifically it looks at these areas:

* Students must learn how to evaluate online content - Think of this as a research skill.

* Students must be able to engage with others online and communicate - Think of this as a communication tool.

* Students need to learn how to create and projects can be digital.

These three areas come together and create the skill sets needed to digitally literate. More information is available about this in the post.

And if you happen to live in the New England area you might consider checking out the Massachusetts New Literacies Institute that will be taking place in at the Kittredge Center in Holyoke, MA from July 8 - 10. Information for this may be found at http://mnli.org/. This institute looks at three cornerstones: Online Content Reading, Online Collaborative Inquiry and Online Content Construction "preparing future-ready teachers."

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7 Ways To Use Google Tools To Maximize Learning - Edudemic

7 Ways To Use Google Tools To Maximize Learning - Edudemic | School Librarians | Scoop.it
There are a boatload of awesome Google tools that we use every day. And they’re free, too, which tends to be a big winner for teachers and students. Free is probably the number one reason for giving Google’s tools a try – you haven’t lost anything but a bit of time if you decide you …

Via Beth Dichter
LibrarianLand's insight:

More from Google. Maybe useful, but all-knowing. 

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Sharrock's curator insight, March 26, 4:44 PM
Beth Dichter's insight:

Google provides so many tools it is hard to keep track of all of them. This post provides information on 7 tools that may find a place in your classroom. 
Would you like to provide audio feedback to your students, or have peers provide audio feedback? If you are using Google Drive this is possible.

Do you have a student that needs a clean and clear space to write, with no distractions? If Chrome is available as a browser consider installing the app Write Space, a "minimalist text editor."

If students are working in Google Drive and are researching a paper they may have found the Research Tool that allows you to quickly search the web for specific information, make suggestions and more.

Google Forms continues to add features, including the ability to create surveys. Have your students design a survey and graph their data, or use it the survey tool to do a quick formative assessment as an exit ticket.

Learn more about Moderator, Image Directory, and Google Templates (that's right, Google has templates designed for students and teachers) in the post. Chances are you will find at least one or two tools to use for yourself or with your students (or both)!

Ali Anani's curator insight, March 27, 12:47 AM

Discover delightful Google tools

Ness Crouch's curator insight, March 28, 5:12 PM

I love my Google tools! What do you use them for?

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How to Reinvent Project Based Learning to Be More Meaningful

How to Reinvent Project Based Learning to Be More Meaningful | School Librarians | Scoop.it
Project-based learning continues to be misinterpreted as a single teaching strategy rather than as a set of design principles that allow us to introduce the philosophy of inquiry into education in an intelligent and grounded way. It’s time to not only address the flaws in PBL, but to reinvent it in a way that leads to deeper learning, creative inquiry, and a better fit with a collaborative world in which doing and knowing are one thing.

Via Beth Dichter
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Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, March 24, 11:31 PM

As the article suggests if carried out correctly project based learning can be a deeper learning experience.  PBL also leads to creative enquiry and teamwork.

Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, March 25, 7:04 AM

This is helpful as a philosophical vision - how to rethink our teaching to effectively integrate the inquiry process. Love it! 

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, March 25, 11:32 AM

This post includes some strategic suggestions on how to make PBL more meaningful for your students. 

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5 Assessment Forms That Promote Content Retention

5 Assessment Forms That Promote Content Retention | School Librarians | Scoop.it
If we hope to construct enduring understanding in our students, it's critical that, now more than ever, we know their strengths and interests. By incorporating students' strengths and weakness into a

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 22, 3:24 PM

As teachers today we are told that we must teach our students and help them construct "enduring understanding", providing them with the ability to transfer knowledge from one subject area to another subject area. We are also told that we should personalize education, requiring us to know the strengths and weaknesses and incorporate this into our lessons. And let's not forget that we must also assess our students. How can we make our assessments help students with content retention? This post focuses on this question, and provides five suggestions on ways to do this.

The first three suggestions are:

  • Tests Where Notes or Textbooks are Permitted
  • Take-Home Tests
  • Student-Made Tests

These types of tests may take more time to create but they have the ability to be written so that students have to do more than memorize information. There is more information on this in the post.

The next suggestion is:

  • Projects Pre-Approved by the Teacher

This requires that students demonstrate mastery of the subject. This will require the student to create (a 21st century goal) and additional information is in the post, including a discussion of what this might look like.

The final suggestion is:

    • Revisions and Retests to Build Skillsets

    This section discusses what we may do to help out student build their skillsets through feedback and opportunities to construct accurate information.

    As you read this post you may begin to consider alternative ways to assess your students that help them with content retention.

    Kathy Lynch's curator insight, March 23, 10:25 AM

    Ideas to expand thinking on current assessments, particularly for those who do not test well. Thx Beth Dichter!

    Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, March 24, 10:46 AM

    As teachers today we are told that we must teach our students and help them construct "enduring understanding", providing them with the ability to transfer knowledge from one subject area to another subject area. We are also told that we should personalize education, requiring us to know the strengths and weaknesses and incorporate this into our lessons. And let's not forget that we must also assess our students. How can we make our assessments help students with content retention? This post focuses on this question, and provides five suggestions on ways to do this.

    The first three suggestions are:

    Tests Where Notes or Textbooks are PermittedTake-Home TestsStudent-Made Tests

    These types of tests may take more time to create but they have the ability to be written so that students have to do more than memorize information. There is more information on this in the post.

    The next suggestion is:

    Projects Pre-Approved by the Teacher

    This requires that students demonstrate mastery of the subject. This will require the student to create (a 21st century goal) and additional information is in the post, including a discussion of what this might look like.

    The final suggestion is:

    Revisions and Retests to Build Skillsets

    This section discusses what we may do to help out student build their skillsets through feedback and opportunities to construct accurate information.

    As you read this post you may begin to consider alternative ways to assess your students that help them with content retention.

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    15 Examples of Student-Centered Teaching

    15 Examples of Student-Centered Teaching | School Librarians | Scoop.it

    15 Examples of Student-Centered Teaching by Terry Heick 15 Examples of Student-Centered Teaching–And 15 That Are Not So Much On Sunday, we’re going to release a basic framework to begin to make sense of what “student-centered learning” mean in...


    Via Karen Bonanno
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    Teaching Students Skills to become Better Online Readers

    Teaching Students Skills to become Better Online Readers | School Librarians | Scoop.it

    Soon after Maryanne Wolf published “Proust and the Squid,” a history of the science and the development of the reading brain from antiquity to the twenty-first century, she began to receive letters from readers. Hundreds of them. While the backgrounds of the writers varied, a theme began to emerge: the more reading moved online, the less students seemed to understand."


    Via Beth Dichter
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    Betty Skeet's curator insight, August 1, 9:08 AM

    Reading on line...a good habit? Here to stay?

    Helen Teague's curator insight, August 3, 6:36 AM
    Do students retain more information when they read from books rather than from digital devices? Does reading online present challenges due to distractions? Do students need to be taught skills to become better online readers?
    Ruby Day's curator insight, August 3, 2:21 PM

    Studies show we are not reading as effectively online as we are with hard copies. This highlights the need for tools to help us read deeper online - e.g annotation type tools. This links to an interesting stuy of year 5 students using collaborative annotation software demonstrating higher performance than the control group's' paper based annotation.

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    How To Take Notes: Strategies That Set Straight-A Students Apart

    How To Take Notes:  Strategies That Set Straight-A Students Apart | School Librarians | Scoop.it
    Most students take notes without thinking twice about it. It's what a good student does, what the professor expects, what everyone around them is doing.

    Via Beth Dichter
    LibrarianLand's insight:

    Long hand note taking appears to beat typed note taking in many instances.

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    Betty Skeet's curator insight, July 14, 3:19 AM

    When do we start the habit of taking notes? Strategies to helpstudents...

    Jan MacWatters's curator insight, July 14, 7:03 AM

    It's always a good idea to review not taking skills periodically...  Many students just highlight everything....without actually creating anything useful 

    Laura Saavedra's curator insight, July 14, 1:54 PM

    Good for students and even teachers!

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    How Tweens and Teens are Using Social Media — Infographic Labs

    How Tweens and Teens are Using Social Media — Infographic Labs | School Librarians | Scoop.it

    Via Beth Dichter
    LibrarianLand's insight:

    According to this article there appears to be a difference between what teens and kids younger than teens prefer as far as social media platforms are concerned.

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    Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 28, 7:23 PM

    Check out this infographic that looks at how teens and tweens are using social media. It probably comes as no surprise that they are very active in the use of social media. One statistic they show is

    * Surveys have found that majority or 81 percent of kids aged 12 to 17 use social media. This figure is higher than the 72 percent of internet users overall.

    For more information click through to the post.

    Betty Skeet's curator insight, May 30, 2:41 AM

    Useful infographic about how teens use social media. Parents these days have to be aware of all these new technologies ...

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    15 Must Have Google Lessons Plans to Teach Students Effective Search Skills

    15 Must Have Google  Lessons Plans to Teach Students Effective Search Skills | School Librarians | Scoop.it
    April , 2014
    Google is one of the primary search engines students turn to when doing their research. On the face of it, searching Google seems as simple as typing in a search query and waiting for...

    Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
    LibrarianLand's insight:

    This appears to be a potentially helpful rubric for developing standards and objectives.

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    Cynthia Alvarado's curator insight, May 13, 12:40 PM

    Kids do not know this stuff.

    Jo Laretive's curator insight, May 14, 2:38 AM

    Always keen to up-skill myself and students with online searching.

    Sally Tilley's curator insight, May 15, 6:29 PM

    Thanks for sharing, the more we teach on this the better of our students will be in the information-saturated world they live in!

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    Upgrade your KWL Chart to the 21st Century

    Upgrade your KWL Chart to the 21st Century | School Librarians | Scoop.it
    One of the take aways from the Curriculum Mapping Institute this past week was that it brought an upgrade to THE trusted KWL (Know, What to Know and Learned) Chart to the forefront. It seems a no b...

    Via Beth Dichter
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    Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 23, 6:57 PM

    Not too long ago I posted an article that suggested we move from the KWL chart to the KWHL chart...and here is another post that suggests we make it more in-depth by adding the letters A and Q.

    What do all these letters stand for?

    K - What do I know?

    W - What do I want to know?

    H - How do I find out?

    L - What have I learned?

    A - What action will I take?

    Q - What new questions do I have?

    More in-depth discussions of these new letters are included in the post.

    The Rice Process's curator insight, April 24, 3:55 AM

    Taking the KWL chart to the next level.

    Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, April 24, 5:43 AM

    I love this idea - it fits beautifully with the concept of Inquiry-based learning and students assuming ownership of the research process - Yay ACTION! The idea that learning and research are ongoing - and active - is a key element to new learning models. Very exciting!

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    As Researchers Turn to Google, Libraries Navigate the Messy World of Discovery Tools

    As Researchers Turn to Google, Libraries Navigate the Messy World of Discovery Tools | School Librarians | Scoop.it

    Librarians want to make their content searchable, but they’re wary of commercial software that may skew the results.

     

     

    Many professors and students gravitate to Google as a gateway to research. Libraries want to offer them a comparably simple and broad experience for searching academic content. As a result, a major change is under way in how libraries organize information. Instead of bewildering users with a bevy of specialized databases—books here, articles there—many libraries are bulldozing their digital silos. They now offer one-stop search boxes that comb entire collections, Google style.

    That’s the ideal, anyway. The reality is turning out to be messier.


    Via Elizabeth E Charles
    LibrarianLand's insight:

    The question is, what is being lost by trying to make it a quick and easy one stop shop?

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    Educator as Model Learner

    Educator as Model Learner | School Librarians | Scoop.it
    The educator's role has or should change in this age of information abundance or Education 2.0-3.0.  The educator's role has always been to model and demonstrate effective learning, but  somewhere ...

    Via Beth Dichter
    LibrarianLand's insight:

    I especially like the idea of modeling by explaining what thought processes one is going through when demonstrating or learning a task. It could be helpful to apply this when demonstrating how to do research or how to search a database.

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    Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 14, 2:34 AM

    The world is changing at an ever growing pace and in todays world students need to learn "how to learn." How do we as teachers help our students learn "how to learn"? By modeling it in our daily work with our students we can instill the skills and help them understand that we too are in the process of learning. 

    Jackie Gerstein provides a post that explores how our roles are changing and how the roles of our learners are chaning because of Education 2.0-3.0 (with a link to a post that describes this).  

    What does "teaching the process of learning" mean? A few of her points are below:

    • Modeling of learning processes needs to be intentional, strategic, and overt.
    • The educator should be familiar with and able to demonstrate metacognitive processe.
    There are two additional points (well worth reading) as well as three points on shifts that need to be made for this to occur. As always Gerstein brings up an issue, provides insight into the issue as well as links to additional resources, and make you sit back and think about your teaching and your classroom.
    Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, April 15, 3:54 PM

    Some good resources here. 

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    Bloom's Taxonomy: Teacher Planning Kit

    Bloom's Taxonomy: Teacher Planning Kit | School Librarians | Scoop.it

    Via Beth Dichter
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    Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 28, 6:41 PM

    This pdf file is fairly large and looks at the original version of Bloom's Taxonomy but it is an in-depth look that moves from the lower ordering thinking skills to the higher order thinking skills and includes a definition for each level as well as:

    * Key Words - an extensive list for each level

    * Actions and Outcomes for each level

    * Questions specific to each level

    To access the full pdf: 

    http://educatingmatters.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/blooms_taxonomy_teacher_planning_kit1.pdf 

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    Best Websites for Teaching & Learning 2013 | American Association of School Librarians (AASL)

    Best Websites for Teaching & Learning 2013 | American Association of School Librarians (AASL) | School Librarians | Scoop.it

    The 2013 Best Websites for Teaching and Learning foster the qualities of innovation, creativity, active participation, and collaboration. They are free, Web-based sites that are user friendly and encourage a community of learners to explore and discover.


    Via Karen Bonanno
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    Lourense Das's curator insight, March 26, 8:56 AM

    American School Library Association #AASL publishes "best websites for teaching & learning 2013".

    Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, March 27, 2:58 AM

    Useful posting, must check out these sites.

    Anita Vance's curator insight, March 27, 8:22 AM

    Thank you, Karen Bonanno for sharing this.  The sites are linked to standards for easy transitions to teachable connections.

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    5 Tech Savvy Teaching Tools That Your Students Will Love

    5 Tech Savvy Teaching Tools That Your Students Will Love | School Librarians | Scoop.it
    These Fun, Free Web Applications Make it Quick and Easy to Create Cool Learning Content (Watch out Though, Other Teachers Will be Banging Down Your Door Looking

    Via Beth Dichter
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    Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 23, 7:00 PM

    Five resources are shared in this post, with explanations about how to use them in your classroom. All have free versions available.

    * LessonPaths (http://www.lessonpaths.com/) allows you to put together groups of web resources and other digital resources in one location. (This was called MentorMob.)

    * Blendspace (https://www.blendspace.com/schools) is similar to LessonPaths but with a different look to it. Check them both out to see which fits your needs.

    * Geddit (http://letsgeddit.com/) provides a space where you can ask questions and students can respond using most any digital device that can access the Internet.

    * TED-Ed (http://letsgeddit.com/) is a resource that provides lessons that include a video, questions, resources and a discussion forum and allow you to flip any lesson you find. Additional videos are added frequently.

    * Powtoon (http://www.powtoon.com) allows you to create videos using templates. It is a little more complex to learn and you will be limited to five minute videos unless you subscribe. There is an educational version available.

    Have fun exploring these tools and creating content to engage your students!

    Lori Wilk's curator insight, March 23, 8:14 PM

    This list of webistes offers suggestions for sites with tools  to help teachers to create interactive learning environment from surveys, to lessons, to making short videos. Super helpful escpecially since there's both free and paid versions available. You can have teaching tools on a zero or low budget.#education#technology.  

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    The ABCs of Information Literacy Infographic

    The ABCs of Information Literacy Infographic | School Librarians | Scoop.it
    The ABCs of Information Literacy Infographic shares key information literacy terms that all students should understand to be successful in research.

    Via Karen Bonanno
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    Lourense Das's curator insight, March 22, 6:06 AM

    Information Literacy Infographic: ABC of IL #IL #Informationliteracy

    Glenda Morris's curator insight, March 22, 12:30 PM

    A-Z of. Information infographic - lists terms

    Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, March 23, 6:25 AM

    I would have used "Gathering" instead of Google for the letter G. As much as I do not teach students to exclude Google as a search tool, I insist they use other databases (Nettrekker, Discovery Ed, & other encyclopedias) first.