School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
1.9K views | +0 today
Follow
School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Why So Many Diversity Programs Fail

Why So Many Diversity Programs Fail | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Hiring tests don’t really solve the diversity problem, either, for some of the same reasons. In theory, skills-based testing is designed to level the playing field and let the best candidate shine. But managers didn’t appreciate being told to hire someone they didn’t hand select. Dobbin and Kalev also found that some companies were only giving the tests to people they didn’t want to hire, i.e. under-represented minorities. Or, they just ignored the results in favor of picking who they wanted.

Sharrock's insight:
School districts should consider this research and its findings. The tech industry is being noticed now in the public, but education also has the diversity issue, especially in leadership positions, but also in the learner leadership positions (teaching/educator).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Beware Of Simple Rules And Slogans—They Can Kill Your Business | Digital Tonto

Beware Of Simple Rules And Slogans—They Can Kill Your Business | Digital Tonto | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

as the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein pointed out, “no course of action can be determined by a rule, because any course of action can be made out to accord with the rule.” 


In other words, rules may seem to make sense, but when we try to apply them in the real world we find that things are far more complicated and simple rules aren’t much help.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Why narcissistic leaders are like chocolate cake

Why narcissistic leaders are like chocolate cake | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Supporting their chocolate cake model, the researchers recruited 142 unacquainted students to take part in weekly group tasks. Through the course of the study, the students rated each others' leadership skills. High scorers in narcissism attracted positive leadership ratings from their peers early on, but this positive impression faded. The deteriorating perception of narcissists over time was partly explained by their lack of so-called "transformational leadership skills" becoming apparent – that is, their inability to motivate and inspire others. A second study was similar but involved students who already knew each other. In this case, the narcissists did not receive positive leadership ratings from the outset – there was no honeymoon period for them – and as the study went on, they received more negative ratings from their peers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

12 Easy Phrases to Massively Improve Your Leadership

12 Easy Phrases to Massively Improve Your Leadership | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
At the heart of great leadership is a desire to serve others, to empower them and foster their success. Here are 12 phrases that every leader should be saying--a lot.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

How Cisco Gets Brutally Honest Feedback to Top Leaders

How Cisco Gets Brutally Honest Feedback to Top Leaders | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Regular assessments have four major benefits. Any CEO would agree that having a strong core of seasoned executives running the C-suite is critical. Yet many organizations haven’t developed beyond the hunch phase in terms of knowing how strong their top leaders really are. At Cisco, we designed an in-depth executive assessment to help us profile each of our topmost leaders: strengths, development needs, aspirations, strategic capabilities, blind spots, operational capabilities, how they develop their teams, how they fare in big-stage versus one-on-one communications, and so on.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Beware those toxic co-workers

Beware those toxic co-workers | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
At some point in our careers, most of us have come across someone known as a “toxic worker,” a colleague or boss whose abrasive style or devious actions can make the workday utterly miserable. Such people hurt morale, stoke conflict in the office, and harm a company’s reputation.

But toxic workers aren’t just annoying or unpleasant to be around; they cost firms significantly more money than most of them even realize. According to a new Harvard Business School (HBS) paper, toxic workers are so damaging to the bottom line that avoiding them or rooting them out delivers twice the value to a company that hiring a superstar performer does.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from digitalNow
Scoop.it!

Research Finds Leadership Quality is Barely Improving

Research Finds Leadership Quality is Barely Improving | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
25% of organisations report their leaders are not VUCA-capable.
The top 20% of organisations performing well financially are three times more likely to have VUCA-capable leaders than the bottom 20 percent.
15% of organisations rated their future bench strength as strong.
One in three organisations are focused on developing their leaders’ ability to foster innovation
One in five is emphasising development in global leadership.

Via Don Dea
more...
Sue Hickton's curator insight, February 18, 7:45 AM

hmmm interesting read

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

What The Pope Knows: The Power Of An Apology

What The Pope Knows: The Power Of An Apology | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Francis’s words cast in sharp relief the nuttiness of this no-apology obsession.

First, he was frankly apologetic: “I humbly ask forgiveness, not only for the offenses of the church herself, but also for crimes committed against the native peoples during the so-called conquest of America.”
Sharrock's insight:

This article explores an issue I've been curious about. How does diplomacy and negotiations work with countries and other societies (organizations) that have existed for a long time? My main question has to do with history and culture versus their contemporary needs and interests. Who is the organization (society): its past leadership and actions or its present leadership and needs?

 

At the individual level, we are taught not to take responsibility for someone else's actions. How can you be sincere about being apologetic? It seems like a customer service tactic. 

 

However, when a family member does something wrong, don't you feel the need to apologize for that person--especially, if it's a son or daughter--but can also extend to actions of a spouse? 

 

Are we doing a disservice to individuals and leaders by holding them accountable for actions of others? Previous leaders? Previous economic situations? different eras? We might often state "If I knew then what I know now..." things would be different or would have gone differently. There is a sense that we could somehow do better with more information, yet look at the criticism of world leaders who regularly meet with committees and advisers and intelligence. Each nation's economy has changed from the past, each nation has its crimes against humanity, its genocidal history, its issues with poverty and starvation. Each nation also stages struggles between its leaders and the business classes and the impoverished. Instant information access has transformed politics everywhere. 

 

So, why are we still looking for apologies from people who weren't responsible for the insult(s)? Why do I suddenly want to know more about psychodrama? And more importantly, why are these apologies (sometimes) so powerful, cathartic? Why does acknowledgement of past wrongs, committed by an organization they weren't leading, mean anything?

 

This article suggests that there is something more going on. One, it's a sign that with the acknowledgement of past wrongdoings, a new era is beginning. It's like saying, yes, we did this due to bad policy and even worse decision making, but take this as a break from the past. We have a new approach and new philosophy. We are rebranding, so to speak. 

 

So many implications...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Best Employee Engagement Strategy Is From The Bottom Up

The Best Employee Engagement Strategy Is From The Bottom Up | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
VideoSo what’s the right employee engagement strategy to dramatically increase engagement in your organization? Well let’s first talk about the wrong strategy... Usually, someone from HR has to convince the CEO to spend money on an employee survey. And when the results come back, the data is hoarded by the senior leadership [...]
Sharrock's insight:

There are devleopmental differences between adults and students (children), but there might be takeaways that educators might use in classrooms and schools.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The 3 Kinds of Burnout

The 3 Kinds of Burnout | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
We typically think of “burnout” as the result of working too many hard, stressful hours. However, new research shows that burnouts actually come in three different types, and each requires a different strategy to fix.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

What does it take to change people's minds? | Game-Changer

What does it take to change people's minds? | Game-Changer | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
In his book “The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion“, Jonathan Haidt, a social psychologist at New York University, observes that most of the moral reasoning people do is oriented not towards discovering the truth, but towards justifying their beliefs to others in their social group. “Moral reasoning is more like a politician seeking votes than a scientist seeking truth,” Mr Haidt writes. “We are obsessively concerned about what others think of us.” For the most part, people select their moral beliefs the way they select their clothes, asking themselves whether this or that opinion is appropriate to their identity and how it will look to their friends. When they do engage in moral reasoning, they do it to justify taking the position necessary to fit in. If people’s moral stances are shifting rapidly, it is because they are getting signals from others in their group that a different belief is now acceptable.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Big Dog and Little Dog's Performance Juxtaposition

Big Dog and Little Dog's Performance Juxtaposition | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
A resource for human performance, leadership, learning, training, instructional design, and development.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Creativity & Innovation for success
Scoop.it!

Are You An Analog or Digital Leader?

Are You An Analog or Digital Leader? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
By Abhijit Bhaduri and Bill Fischer Changing mindsets begins with you! The only mind you can be sure of changing is your own, and the only way that you can demonstrate this mindset change is through your behaviors.

Via Alexander Crépin
more...
CIM Academy's curator insight, March 27, 2015 6:44 AM

Times are changing and being a digital leader is now a key aspect of  achieving marketing success.

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Pros and Cons Of New Unconventional Leadership Styles

The Pros and Cons Of New Unconventional Leadership Styles | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
"It’s no longer just about your emotional intelligence," says Deborah Ancona, director of the MIT Leadership Center. "It’s about your ability to understand complexities, solve problems, and get things done"—no matter what leadership style that comes in.

Below are a few common styles that have emerged, and the benefits and problems of each.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Creativity & Innovation for success
Scoop.it!

Why Your Employees’ Suggestions Aren’t Going Anywhere

Why Your Employees’ Suggestions Aren’t Going Anywhere | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

A lot of companies use an ever-more-sophisticated array of online social tools in an attempt to connect their people, get a flow of ideas going, and spur innovation. But after an initial flurry of activity, the initiatives often fizzle and the new tools get tucked away somewhere. What goes wrong? Why is the goal of a more collaborative and innovative organization so elusive?
Consider a real example: Not long after a company created an online suggestion box on its new intranet, with all the bells and whistles of the latest social-media technologies, an executive lamented: “All we get are a bunch of complaints and impossibly wild ideas that we couldn’t follow up on in a million years.”
And there lies the problem. The span of ideas and suggestions on internal social platforms is often so extensive that follow-up is impossible. When ideas are ignored, or at least appear to be, people quickly get discouraged and stop contributing.


Via Alexander Crépin
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

9 Communication Habits That All Successful Leaders Have

9 Communication Habits That All Successful Leaders Have | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The way you communicate as a leader is important. The right tone, the right voice, the right body language--these elements are as important as the words you say, sometimes more.

Having a leader who understands the principles of great communication can make the difference between a collaborative team and one that goes in circles.

If we can get our communication right, we can build strong teams, be persuasive with clients and generally accelerate our business.

Here are some principles to remember.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Hillary’s humility moment: A rabbi walks into a Town Hall and asks a question you’d never hear in the GOP debates

Hillary’s humility moment: A rabbi walks into a Town Hall and asks a question you’d never hear in the GOP debates | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Watching the Democrats' town hall on CNN felt like entering an alternate election universe, where calm prevails
Sharrock's insight:

From the article: "Being president is not just about winning, as Trump has repeatedly insisted it is. It’s about maintaining both your own humanity and the humanity of those you’re serving, and that is a wrenching tension that has grayed the hair of every president since Reagan."


This is something all leaders must contend with. Leadership is not an "either/or" role. The question the rabbi asks may refer to "two pockets", but that is an obvious simplification so that the question can be answered in a few minutes. Instead, the presidency--and any leadership position-- role requires many pockets with notes that remind us of the various ways we lead. The article gave a spiritual point to make, which is something leaders might overlook in the interest of serving a "bottom line" or satisfying stakeholders. 


In education, this is an even more valuable point we need to remember. Our students are not just an audience or customers; they are also in need of being led, to accomplish what they might not know (or remember) what they need to accomplish.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Effective Education
Scoop.it!

Understanding and Managing Conflict Styles

In order to manage workplace conflict, it’s important to understand and adjust to each situation and to the preferred conflict style of those involved. Understanding your own preferred conflict style and the preferred conflict style of others can really help take some emotion and some personalization out of the conflict. When we understand conflict styles, we hopefully will stop thinking in terms of “I’m right and he’s wrong,” and take the actions of others less personally. Then we can use the energy we’d normally waste on trying to figure them out to creatively resolve the underlying issues of the dispute. We can also consciously choose to use a different conflict style when the situation demands it. But this takes practice to use a style that perhaps isn’t as comfortable for you as your preferred style.


Via Bonnie Hohhof, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
Miftachul Aristy's curator insight, December 30, 2015 4:05 AM

 Ketika Anda mempunyai banyak keinginan, maka libatkan banyak tindakan.

http://caramengobatiambeien.net/

Miftachul Aristy's curator insight, December 30, 2015 4:15 AM

Bangun pagi adalah tanda bahwa anda bisa mencapai tujuan hidup lebih baik dari kemarin.

http://caramengobatiambeien.net/

Rescooped by Sharrock from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

Just Say No

Just Say No | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

In a new book, leadership expert Ira Chaleff argues teaching employees to disobey orders is an essential management safeguard. Rather, we can short-circuit the ingrained habit of employees to automatically obey orders by teaching them to follow a formula that Chaleff distills as: Understand the mission of the organization, the goals of your activities, and the values that are supposed to govern how you achieve those goals;

 If you receive an order that seems to violate the mission, goals, or values, ask for clarification. Then, further evaluate the order to determine the source of the problem (whether it involves safety, legality, morality, etc.); Consciously decide whether to obey the order or whether to resist it and offer an acceptable alternative if possible; and Assume personal accountability for whichever choice you make.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How to fire people with dignity

How to fire people with dignity | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
In an excerpt from It Takes More than Casual Fridays and Free Coffee, Diane K. Adams shows you how to ease the pain of the firing process.
Sharrock's insight:

Great movie that explores this issue: The Secret Life of Walter Mitty with Ben Stiller (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Secret_Life_of_Walter_Mitty_(2013_film).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Creativity and the Role of the Leader

Creativity and the Role of the Leader | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Your organization could use a bigger dose of creativity. Here’s what to do about it.

 

If you’re trying to enhance creativity…

…remember that you are not the sole fount of ideas.

Be the appreciative audience.

Ask the inspiring questions.

Allow ideas to bubble up from the workforce.

…enable collaboration.

Combat the lone inventor myth.

Define “superstar” as someone who helps others succeed.

Use “coordination totems”—metaphors, analogies, and stories—to help teams conceptualize together.

…enhance diversity.

Get people with different backgrounds and expertise to work together.

Encourage individuals to gain diverse experiences that will increase their creativity.

Open up the organization to outside creative contributors.

…map the stages of creativity and tend to their different needs.

Avoid process management in the fuzzy front end.

Provide sufficient time and resources for exploration.

Manage the handoff to commercialization.

…accept the inevitability and utility of failure.

Create psychological safety to maximize learning from failure.

Recognize the different kinds of failure and how they can be useful.

Create good mechanisms for filtering ideas and killing dead-end projects.

…motivate with intellectual challenge.

Protect the front end from commercial pressure.

Clear paths through the bureaucracy for creative ideas.

Let people do “good work.”

Show the higher purpose of projects whenever possible.

Grant as much independence as possible.

http://www.creativeleader.com/qualties-of-visionary-leaders/

Sharrock's insight:

http://www.creativeleader.com/qualties-of-visionary-leaders/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Coping with Stress and Types of Burnout: Explanatory Power of Different Coping Strategies

Coping with Stress and Types of Burnout: Explanatory Power of Different Coping Strategies | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Policies and interventions to promote mental health should be designed to effectively involve the work environment and process as a key arena for action [1]. The majority of people in developed and developing countries now live in cities and are formally or informally linked to workplaces where most of their productive lives are spent [2]. Studies have shown the importance of work stressors both in the generation and prevention of mental disorders [3], but there is still a lack of policies and interventions that effectively improve workers’ mental health and prevent disorders. Interestingly, even among mental health workers, work-related mental disorders are highly prevalent [4]. Thus, work environments and processes are key elements in public health.

Burnout syndrome is an important work-related disorder of psychosocial origin, caused when stressful working conditions are endured. Its presence has been associated with a worsened self-perception of health and a large amount of somatic comorbidity [5]. Burnout has traditionally been described as a relatively uniform entity in all individuals, with more or less consistent aetiology and symptoms [6]. According to the classical definition, this syndrome includes the dimensions of exhaustion, cynicism and professional inefficacy [7], [8]. ‘Exhaustion’ is the feeling of not being able to offer any more of oneself at an emotional level; ‘cynicism’ represents a distant attitude towards work, those served by it, and colleagues; and ‘inefficacy’ is the feeling of not performing tasks adequately or being incompetent at work. These dimensions are strongly associated with each other, providing a unitary although three-dimensional definition of burnout [9].

Nevertheless, different burnout types have been proposed, according to the degree of dedication at work [10]. The ‘frenetic’ burnout type works increasingly harder, to the point of exhaustion, in search of success, and presents involvement, ambition and overload. The ‘under-challenged’ type has to cope with monotonous and unstimulating conditions that fail to provide satisfaction and feels indifference, boredom and lack of personal development. The ‘worn-out’ type gives up when faced with stress or the absence of gratification and shows lack of control, lack of acknowledgement and neglect [11], [12]. The dimensions of overload, lack of development and neglect, belonging to the frenetic, under-challenged and worn-out subtypes, respectively, comprise a definition of burnout that comes close to the standard perspective [9], [13]. ‘Overload’ refers to individuals’ feeling of risking health and personal life in the pursuit of good results and is significantly associated with exhaustion; ‘lack of development’ refers to the absence of personal growth experiences for individuals together with their desire to take on other jobs where they can better develop their skills and is markedly associated with cynicism; ‘neglect’ refers to individuals’ disregard as a response to any difficulty and is strongly associated with inefficacy [13], [14]. While approaching the standard definition, the dimensions referred to in the typological model show little relation to each other, which allows a differential characterisation of the syndrome to be made by means of clinical profiles [13].

In general, ‘burnout’ is a subject’s response to chronic work-related stress and is an attempt to adapt to or protect oneself from it [15]. Stress has been defined as the result of a relationship with the environment that the person appraises as significant for his or her well-being, and in which demands tax or exceed available coping resources. Coping is defined as cognitive and behavioural efforts to manage specific internal and/or external demands that are appraised as taxing or exceeding the person’s resources [10], [16]. A person will be psychologically vulnerable to a particular situation if he or she does not possess sufficient coping resources to handle it adequately and places considerable importance on the threat implicit in the consequences of this inadequate handling. There are different general trends in coping with stress, such as cognitive or behavioural coping, cognitive or behavioural avoidance, emotion-focused coping or substance use [17]–[19]. From this perspective, burnout may be observed as a progressively developed condition resulting from the use of the ineffective coping strategies with which professionals try to protect themselves from work-related stress situations [20].

There is an accumulation of evidence linking coping styles with stress and burnout. At first, coping style was studied as a relatively stable characteristic of the person, regardless of the nature of the task or situation, showing that certain inflexible coping styles could be associated with higher levels of stress [21], [22]. Subsequently, the emphasis was placed on the relationship between the coping style and the situation [16]. Early research seemed to support the idea that problem-focused coping was a better strategy than emotion-focused coping for stress management. However, it was later found that there were sub-factors that did not allow the application of such a general conclusion [23]. Problem-focused coping is not an appropriate strategy to address stress if the situation is uncontrollable or chronic [24], as it could lead, in this case, to a progressive process of behavioural disengagement [25]. Emotional coping has been noted to be detrimental if it involves distancing, avoidance or denial regarding the situation but is an effective strategy if it involves a positive reappraisal [26], [27]. In the long term, the key factor for developing the burnout syndrome seems to be the degree of passivity that the subject acquires [19], [28], [29].

So far, possible relationships between burnout types and coping strategies have not been explored. A better knowledge of the coping strategies associated with each burnout profile could promote the development of specific treatments and preventive programmes for the syndrome that might potentially be more effective [26]. In this context, the aim of this work was to estimate the explanatory power of the different styles of coping with stress on the development of different burnout subtypes, evaluating the contribution of specific coping strategies. In general terms, the hypotheses were established according to the degree of dedication at work shown by the different burnout subtypes. The frenetic burnout subtype is a highly dedicated profile, which means that the related overload could be associated with active coping strategies, such as those included in problem-focused coping. The under-challenged burnout subtype is a profile characterised by an intermediate dedication to work, meaning that the related lack of development could be associated with avoidance coping strategies. The worn-out burnout subtype is a profile characterised by a low level of dedication, meaning that the associated neglect could be due to a behavioural impairment related to the use of disengagement strategies. In essence, this grading of the levels of dedication could be pointing to different stages in the longitudinal development of the syndrome. Different coping strategies for stress could be contributing to each of these [10], [12].
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Guide to Creating Mission & Vision Statements

Guide to Creating Mission & Vision Statements | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The second installment in this series centers around creating mission and vision statements. These principles hold true not only to those looking to create or evaluate a mission and vision statement for a volunteer program but for any other place were they are used.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Why Compassion Is a Better Managerial Tactic than Toughness

Why Compassion Is a Better Managerial Tactic than Toughness | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
How should we react when an employee is not performing well or makes a mistake? How to respond when an employee messes up.

Via donhornsby, Roger Francis, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, May 11, 2015 10:48 AM

(From the article): When trust, loyalty, and creativity are high, and stress is low, employees are happier and more productive and turnover is lower. Positive interactions even make employees healthier and require fewer sick days. Other studies have shown how compassionate management leads to improvements in customer service and client outcomes and satisfaction.

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Best Kept Secret to Phenomenal Productivity

The Best Kept Secret to Phenomenal Productivity | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Kim Cameron and his colleagues at the University of Michigan, however, have discovered a way to improve performance that has nothing to do with dishing out benefits or deploying new processes. In a research article published in the Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, Cameron and his coauthors found that a workplace characterized by positive and virtuous practices excels in a number of domains.
more...
No comment yet.