School Leadership...
Follow
Find tag "Science"
1.2K views | +0 today
School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sharrock from Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan
Scoop.it!

Interdisciplinary Literacy - Science

The Science Interdisciplinary Science Presentation for EMWP - Julie King, Lauren Luedtke, Jeff Taylor, Doug Baker and Julie Blomquist.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 25, 3:52 PM

I am reading David Smith's book Pedagon. He proposes a literacy challenge is we are speeding at such a pace we cannot take time and become literate in the learning we undertake. To be literate is to go deep below the superficial levels and spend time being subjected to the subjects we love.

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

APS Physics | FIP | What can we learn from physics teachers in high scoring countries on the TIMSS and PISA international assessments?

APS Physics | FIP | What can we learn from physics teachers in high scoring countries on the TIMSS and PISA international assessments? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Cherrill Spencer 

High-school teachers are amongst the most important contributors to the development of the science and technology workforce of the future. Many of the more than 23,000 US high-school physics teachers are not adequately prepared to teach the subject. Only one-third of them, for example, majored in physics or physics education. Can inadequate teacher preparation be a factor in the poor performance of US students on international assessments of their achievements in science and physics? Since 1995 the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) has been administered four times to many hundreds of thousands of students in over 60 countries. TIMSS is used to measure trends in the mathematics and science knowledge and skills of fourth- and eighth-graders. The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) has been administered three times since 2000, it focuses on 15-year-olds' capabilities in reading literacy, mathematics literacy, and science literacy. TIMSS Advanced (1995) assessed school-leaving students who have had special preparation in advanced mathematics and physics. In all these studies the US students, including the Advanced Placement physics students, scored below the international average, sometimes in the bottom third of countries!

Three knowledgeable speakers were invited to talk about the physics K-12 education systems in other countries: one that consistently scores at the top of the PISA (Dr. Pekka Hirvonen, Finland) or score much higher than the US on TIMSS (Dr. Jozefina Turlo, Poland, covering various Central European countries) and significantly better on recent bi-lateral comparisons (Dr. Lei Bao, covering China in comparison to the US). This session was designed to find out what we can learn from the physics teaching systems in these high-scoring countries that might be pertinent to our efforts to improve the teaching of physics and science to 8th through 12th graders in the US.

There are several differences in the design and purpose of the TIMSS and PISA assessments; for example the TIMSS focuses on the application of familiar skills and knowledge often emphasized in classrooms, whereas the PISA tests emphasize students' abilities to apply skills and information learned in school to solve problems or make decisions they may face at work. PISA test questions tend to deemphasize factual recall and demand more complex reasoning and problem-solving skills than those on TIMSS, requiring students to apply logic, synthesize information, and communicate solutions clearly

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: 

What can we learn from physics teachers in high scoring countries on the TIMSS and PISA international assessments? : Final words of advice from the three speakers:

Dr Pekka Hirvonen: "Education should be taken seriously; it's an investment for the future"
Dr Lei Bao: "It is not what we teach but how we teach that matters."
Dr Jozefina Turlo: "Follow the recommendations of the 2008 Nuffield Foundation report, Science Education in Europe: Critical Reflections."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

▶ Is Punishment or Reward More Effective? - YouTube

 

 

The psychologist Daniel Kahneman, winner of the 2002 Nobel prize in economics, pointed out that regression to the mean might explain why rebukes can seem to improve performance, while praise seems to backfire.[8] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

 

 

I had the most satisfying Eureka experience of my career while attempting to teach flight instructors that praise is more effective than punishment for promoting skill-learning. When I had finished my enthusiastic speech, one of the most seasoned instructors in the audience raised his hand and made his own short speech, which began by conceding that positive reinforcement might be good for the birds, but went on to deny that it was optimal for flight cadets. He said, “On many occasions I have praised flight cadets for clean execution of some aerobatic maneuver, and in general when they try it again, they do worse. On the other hand, I have often screamed at cadets for bad execution, and in general they do better the next time. So please don’t tell us that reinforcement works and punishment does not, because the opposite is the case.” This was a joyous moment, in which I understood an important truth about the world: because we tend to reward others when they do well and punish them when they do badly, and because there is regression to the mean, it is part of the human condition that we are statistically punished for rewarding others and rewarded for punishing them. I immediately arranged a demonstration in which each participant tossed two coins at a target behind his back, without any feedback. We measured the distances from the target and could see that those who had done best the first time had mostly deteriorated on their second try, and vice versa. But I knew that this demonstration would not undo the effects of lifelong exposure to a perverse contingency.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

Sharrock's insight:

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 

more...
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 1:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 1:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 1:51 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

China isn't creative enough to win a Nobel Prize for science - The Week UK

China isn't creative enough to win a Nobel Prize for science - The Week UK | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
China isn't creative enough to win a Nobel Prize for science The Week UK Triumph in the Nobel science category has become entwined in China's resurgent nationalism, a national priority on a par with the hosting of a successful Olympics or landing a...
Sharrock's insight:

Interesting approach. I should look at Nobel prizes over the past 10 years. If the PISA results aren't supported with Nobel prizes--or other innovation prizes--then what is the value of the PISAs at all? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Milestones in Science Education

Milestones in Science Education | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Highlights of science and math education though the years.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Learning on the Job: Myth vs Science - Association for Psychological Science

Learning on the Job: Myth vs Science - Association for Psychological Science | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

“Training is not as intuitive as it may seem,” Eduardo Salas, a psychological scientist at the University of Central Florida, and his coauthors declare. “There is a science of training that shows that there is a right way and a wrong way to design, deliver, and implement a training program.”

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

How poverty influences a child's brain development

How poverty influences a child's brain development | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Science is figuring out exactly how the damage is done and what steps can be taken to halt and then heal it

Via Deborah McNelis, Tom Perran
more...
David Hain's curator insight, January 29, 2013 2:11 AM

Reminded me of stories of the Romanian orphans from years ago and the power of a hug.

Audrey's comment, January 29, 2013 2:20 AM
There is is the possibility that poverty may prevent the stimulation needed for children to develop their curiosity which leads to learning. Poverty could be confining in terms of not sufficient nutrients in order to help develop the neural network. Also poverty seems to isolate children from social interactions which is critical for development; audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk.
Mercor's curator insight, February 12, 2013 9:23 AM

Rescooped by Ricard Lloria from Positive futures onto Help and Support everybody around the world

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

» Vision Through Darkness - World of Psychology

» Vision Through Darkness - World of Psychology | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
“Everything that we see is a shadow cast by that which we do not see.” This is one of my favorite Dr. Martin Luther King quotes. It is remarkable, in
Sharrock's insight:

I wonder what is meant by the author who says that seeing a client as "physiology,parenting, brain function, or even an amalgam of these is never transformative, even when it is helpful." Is this more about a fixed-mindset lens? The first quote is powerful though: “Everything that we see is a shadow cast by that which we do not see.” It speaks to me about symptoms but also about science itself. So often, we don't really understand causality and metaphysics; we only understand what we experience and such limited reflection on those experiences. Most of us don't know with certainty what fire is; we do know that it is hot and gives light; we know that it can spread. But why doesn't it form as a cloud or as spheres? We see the seasons--winter, spring, summer, fall--but do we really understand that the only cause of the seasons is our relationship to the sun? And what about the moon's phases? Do we really know the explanation? I saw a video presentation that documented that quite a few people don't know (I certainly didn't know, and I had truly believed that I did know). 


In education, this is even more evident. We don't know what theories of learning are most accurate. We don't know the specific resources in a students community, home, or school environment that might have led to a student's successes just like we don't really know the specific reasons for a student's apparent shortcomings. Even with data, there are too many variables we can't control or rule out. We APPROACH truth with answers we suggest, but there is always room for doubt. This is particularly true when trying to improve school attendance. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Strange days indeed...
Scoop.it!

12 Creepiest Looking New Species

12 Creepiest Looking New Species | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Nature never ceases to amaze us....

Via F. Thunus
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How to Read and Understand a Scientific Paper: A Step-by-Step Guide for Non-Scientists

How to Read and Understand a Scientific Paper: A Step-by-Step Guide for Non-Scientists | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
To form a truly educated opinion on a scientific subject, you need to become familiar with current research in that field. And to be able to distinguish between good and bad interpretations of research, you have to be willing and able to read the pri...
Sharrock's insight:

This is gold!!!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Family, gender and young people’s aspirations to get into science | Nuffield Foundation

Family, gender and young people’s aspirations to get into science | Nuffield Foundation | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

This project investigated young people’s interest in careers in science, engineering and technology (SET), by conducting a secondary analysis of data from 11-15 year olds in the British Household Panel Study (BHPS). The researchers used quantitative and qualitative approaches to explore three main questions:

1) How far does gender and family background influence young people’s aspirations concerning SET related careers?

2) Does an early interest in science lead young people to pursue scientific studies and SET related jobs?

3) To what extent are young people who enter science reproducing family patterns or ‘inheriting’ a SET route from their parents?

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: Results--

More boys than girls aspire to SET jobs.Boys also aspire to work in all SET sectors, whilst girls are mainly interested in health-related occupations and science professions.Aspirations for SET jobs have increased since 1994, although this is more pronounced for boys than for girls.Career aspirations are reasonably stable during adolescence. However, for those who do change aspirations, the change is gender specific, with boys increasing SET aspirations as they grow older and girls losing their earlier interest in SET jobs. This points towards an early divergence in the interests of boys and girls at around age 13.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The My Hero Project - Frederick Banting

It is interesting to note that Banting realized how his initial failure at a medical practice in Ontario led him on the road to a Nobel Prize. Like most heroes and discoverers, Banting showed the quality of perseverance, intuition, and courage in the face of what appeared to be insurmountable obstacles. Banting wrote in 1940: "...had I not failed in my one year at London, I might never have started my research work..." Nobel prize winner, accomplished painter, knighted by the queen, and a recipient of the Military Cross for bravery during World War I, Frederick Banting was a saver of lives. 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Brrr! NASA locates coldest place on Earth

Brrr! NASA locates coldest place on Earth | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Beating out the previous record of minus 128.6 degrees Fahrenheit, a NASA satellite pinpoints the coldest place on Earth. Read this article by Amanda Kooser on CNET.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

We Must Change the Culture of Science and Teaching: Freeman Hrabowski at TEDxMidAtlantic 2012

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, has served as President of UMBC (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County) since 1992. His research and publications focus on ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Mass of the Photon

This site is intended for students age 14 and up, and for anyone interested in learning about our universe.
Sharrock's insight:

The weirdest thing I've ever read is that momentum can exist without mass. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Is Science The New Latin?!

Is Science The New Latin?! | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Most scientists aren’t natural communicators. Scientific discoveries aren’t written in Latin, but they may as well be. In this environment, creationism and denialism thrive…
Sharrock's insight:

The challenge here is to help the general public understand concepts that defy personal experience. Too many machines come between what is being studies and what a person can actually see. According to a some lectures I am listening to, it took Einstein 20 years to understand the quantum world, and in the end, he still had problems with accepting concepts like entaglement, even when his own investigations "uncovered" this concept. Technology is a way to approach that understanding, but technology is just "what works". It isn't PROOF of causation, of underlying systems of causation (ie, metaphysics). Then there is the math involved in some of these concepts. It just seems clear to me that in the pursuit of  STEM competence, engineering and technology is concrete so easier accept because the thing works. Creating the technology with engineering is acceptable even though few people will connect particular engineers to particular technologies. Intead, they connect organizations to the tech development--which is another disconnect. Coding for software is another area that is quickly approaching the magickal. People may learn coding basics, but the concepts involved in adaptive systems, expert systems, and the variousl levels of artificial intelligence seem to involve so many academic disciplines and collaboration that this too may be beyond the general public's understanding. 

 

What can we do as educators to facilitate the understanding of the maths and sciences and philosophy that will help students participate in these worlds? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Science recruitment goal attained | Yale Daily News

another way to achieve goals. collaboration in Yale.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Elements of the Periodic Table, Personified as Illustrated Heroes

The Elements of the Periodic Table, Personified as Illustrated Heroes | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
An irreverent take on chemistry from Japanese artist Bunpei Yorifuji.
more...
No comment yet.