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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
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Why Smart People Don't Get Hired

Why Smart People Don't Get Hired | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

"Smart people" (i.e, people with higher cognitive abilities) tend to actually be subject to a greater (cognitive) "bias blindspots". In other words, they are more prone to incorrectly trust their gut instincts (heuristics) when making decisions. As a result, they often make more mistakes of reasoning than the rest of us mortals. In particular, smart people tend to see bias more easily in others than in themselves.

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Why You Hate Work

Why You Hate Work | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Excessive demands are leading to burnout everywhere.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "A 2012 global work force study of 32,000 employees by the consulting company Towers Watson found that the traditional definition of engagement — the willingness of employees to voluntarily expend extra effort — is no longer sufficient to fuel the highest levels of performance. Willing, it turns out, does not guarantee able. Companies in the Towers Watson study with high engagement scores measured in the traditional way had an operating margin of 14 percent. By contrast, companies with the highest number of “sustainably engaged” employees had an operating margin of 27 percent, nearly three times those with the lowest traditional engagement scores."

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 11, 2014 11:59 AM

Not only do we hate work, we hate the commute to and from our work. I told colleagues I would teach for 1/2 the price. That was the wrong thing to say to other teachers. Apparently, even limited altruism is not welcome. When we work for money, it is inevitable that we will become unhappy. When we work for the love of what we do, we find ways to overcome the obstacles.

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Solving The Hidden Challenges Women In Leadership Face - Fast Company

Solving The Hidden Challenges Women In Leadership Face - Fast Company | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Fast Company
Solving The Hidden Challenges Women In Leadership Face
Fast Company
In their 2005 study “The Glass Cliff: Evidence that Women are Over-Represented in Precarious Leadership Positions,” British researchers Michelle K.

Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA
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The education question we should be asking

The education question we should be asking | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

One area of education that doesn’t get enough attention in the loud education reform debate is exactly what is worth learning. In the following post Alfie Kohn explores this problem. Kohn (www.alfiekohn.org) is the author of 13 books about education, parenting, and human behavior, including “The Myth of the Spoiled Child: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom about Children and Parenting,” just published this spring. He lectures widely across the United States and abroad.

 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 5, 2014 11:42 AM

What is worth learning? This has been a question asked in educational research for some time i.e. John Dewey and is still being asked i.e. Bill Pinar and David Jardine. What is worth whiling over is not a bureaucratic and technocratic question, but one which comes to life in classrooms.

RJ Lavallee's curator insight, February 13, 7:41 AM

Alfie Kohn. Brilliant

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Conation: An important factor of mind

Conation changes the implications of research supporting grit, self-efficacy, resilience, and learning styles (to name a few). The article explains: Kolbe (1990) suggests that human beings have a conative style or a preferred method of putting thought into action or interacting with the environment. This might be compared to differences of temperament or personality type (e.g., Huitt, 1988;  Keirsey, 1998; Myers, 1980) that purports to identify general approaches to thinking, feeling, and behavior or to learning style (e.g., McFarland, 1997) that identifies general approaches to encoding and processing information. Kolbe identifies four action or conative modes:

 

Fact Finder (instincts to probe, refine and simplify);

Follow Thru (instincts to organize, reform and adapt);

Quick Start (instincts to improvise, revise and stabilize); and

Implementor (instincts to construct, renovate and envision).

 

How should educators apply these research findings in terms of how we explore grit or self-efficacy? Resilience? differentiation? learning activities? curriculum development? 

Sharrock's insight:

How should educators apply these research findings in terms of how we explore grit or self-efficacy? Resilience? differentiation? learning activities? curriculum development? 

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6 Ways Pushing Past Your Comfort Zone Is Critical To Success

6 Ways Pushing Past Your Comfort Zone Is Critical To Success | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Staying where you're comfortable may feel safe, but pushing past your comfort zone brings more success.
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Educational Leadership:The Key to Changing the Teaching Profession:Checking for Checklists

Educational Leadership:The Key to Changing the Teaching Profession:Checking for Checklists | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.
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Integrating Academic and Behavior Supports: Overview | RTI Action Network

Integrating Academic and Behavior Supports: Overview | RTI Action Network | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Learn how to integrate academic and behavior supports for each tier of intervention in a Response to Intervention (RtI) model.
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Tips for First Year Principals: Eight Ways to Make Your Mark

Tips for First Year Principals: Eight Ways to Make Your Mark | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Content
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The principal-leader checklist | SmartBlogs

The principal-leader checklist | SmartBlogs | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The role of the building principal continues to change at the pace of a whitewater current. In order to support teachers and student achievement in 2013 an
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The Key to Preparing Difficult Students for the Real World

The Key to Preparing Difficult Students for the Real World | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Some of the best and most effective practices to motivate difficult students and improve their behavior at school are met with skepticism and even dismay from more than a handful of educators. These

Via Suvi Salo, Ivon Prefontaine
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 12, 2014 8:28 PM

John Dewey suggested classrooms were simplified communities which mirrored (were fractals) the larger community.

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Qualitative Validity

There has been considerable debate among methodologists about the value and legitimacy of this alternative set of standards for judging qualitative research. On the one hand, many quantitative researchers see the alternative criteria as just a relabeling of the very successful quantitative criteria in order to accrue greater legitimacy for qualitative research. They suggest that a correct reading of the quantitative criteria would show that they are not limited to quantitative research alone and can be applied equally well to qualitative data. They argue that the alternative criteria represent a different philosophical perspective that is subjectivist rather than realist in nature. They claim that research inherently assumes that there is some reality that is being observed and can be observed with greater or less accuracy or validity. if you don't make this assumption, they would contend, you simply are not engaged in research (although that doesn't mean that what you are doing is not valuable or useful).

 
Sharrock's insight:

#implications #motivation #research

 

Some education research is firmly rooted in the social sciences and qualitative research. Education research also benefits from clinical studies, statistics, and the sciences related to cognitive sciences.

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New: Best Online Collaboration Tools - 370+ Tools Organized and Ranked By Category

New: Best Online Collaboration Tools - 370+ Tools Organized and Ranked By Category | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Software tools, web apps and services for online collaboration


Via Robin Good
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Dawn Matheson's curator insight, May 21, 2014 10:51 AM

How cool is this? It is the most comprehensive list I've seen. Thanks to +Robin Good and +Neil Ferree for the info.

Carlos Bisbal's curator insight, May 23, 2014 11:00 AM

Las mejores herramientas de colaboración en línea. Mas de 370 Herramientas organizadas y clasificadas por categorías.

 

Si estás buscando herramientas de colaboración en línea alternativas en este post las tienes disponibles para diferentes tipos de proyectos y propósitos. El directorio contiene más de 370 herramientas de colaboración organizadas en más de 25 categorías diferentes que van desde las videoconferencias a la pantalla compartida, la revisión colaborativa y muchos más.

Margie Teaches Libstudies's curator insight, January 28, 11:26 PM

A list worth exploring

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Here's Why You Should Always Make The First Offer In A Negotiation

Here's Why You Should Always Make The First Offer In A Negotiation | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Make the opening offer — or be open to manipulation.
Sharrock's insight:

I first read about this from Daniel Kahneman Thinking, Fast and Slow. #psychology #anchoring 

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Plans unveiled for world's first X-ray frequency comb

Plans unveiled for world's first X-ray frequency comb | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Device could put fundamental physics to the test.

 

A design for what would be the world's first X-ray frequency comb has been unveiled by physicists in Germany. The team believes that its comb – which would be used to measure the frequencies of X-rays – can be built using existing technologies. A working device could be used to make fundamental measurements in atomic physics with much greater precision than is possible today. The design could even be extended to produce gamma-ray combs, say the physicists.

 

Conventional frequency combs are short laser pulses comprising light at a number of well-defined frequencies. When plotted as intensity versus frequency, the light is represented by a series of sharp, equally spaced peaks that together resemble the teeth of a comb. Combs are used as a ruler to measure with great accuracy an unknown frequency relative to a precisely defined reference frequency, such as an atomic clock. Combs can therefore detect tiny changes in the frequency of a light signal that is associated with a physical phenomenon. For example, the gravitational tug of an exoplanet causes a periodic change in the Doppler shift of the light from its companion star's light.

 

Combs working at optical frequencies were first developed in the 1990s by John Hall at the JILA Lab in Boulder, Colorado, andTheodor Hänsch at Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, Germany, – who shared a Nobel prize for their efforts. Since then, physicists have been extremely keen to produce combs at higher frequencies. Ultraviolet combs have been produced by high-harmonic generation, in which a lower-frequency laser excites electrons in a gas and causes them to accelerate and emit light at higher harmonics of the original laser frequency. However, the intensity of successive harmonics decreases, so generating pulses in the X-ray region would require an impracticably powerful driving laser.

 

Now, Stefano Cavaletto and colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg have come up with a more subtle approach. They propose using three energy levels of the Be2+ ion to create an X-ray comb. The upper excited state lies 123.7 eV above the ground state – a gap that corresponds to low-energy or "soft" X-rays. This state is unstable, and so electrons decay rapidly back to the ground state. The third, metastable state lies just below the main excited state. Electrons in this state remain excited much longer. The group's idea is to use an X-ray free-electron laser to pump electrons from the bottom state to the top state. Another applied laser pulse then leads the excited electrons to the metastable state, where they remain. If an optical frequency comb irradiates the ion, then with every pulse, some of the photons are promoted from the metastable state to the unstable state, before decaying almost immediately to the ground state with the emission of an X-ray pulse. This produces a series of X-ray pulses modulated at the same rate as the original optical pulses, forming an X-ray frequency comb.

 

Such a device could have numerous applications in fundamental physics. For example, it would become possible to measure precise values of the transition energies of the inner-shell electrons in highly charged ions. This would allow for stringent checks on the predictions of quantum electrodynamics and whether the fine-structure constant varies over time. "There are papers predicting that such measurements may be more sensitive at higher energies," explains Cavaletto.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "A working device could be used to make fundamental measurements in atomic physics with much greater precision than is possible today. The design could even be extended to produce gamma-ray combs, say the physicists."

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No Correlation Between Interviewing and On-The-Job Performance

No Correlation Between Interviewing and On-The-Job Performance | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
In 30 years of executive search, over 1000 search projects, and interviews with over 250,000 candidates, we cannot find a single correlation that links how someone interviews with their on-the-job
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Open Humanities Awards celebrate innovative projects using open cultural data | Opensource.com

Open Humanities Awards celebrate innovative projects using open cultural data | Opensource.com | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The Open Humanities Awards encourage budding developers and humanities researchers to collaborate and start new projects that use open content and data, paving the way for a vibrant cultural and research commons to emerge.

Via Ivan Begtin, Fàtima Galan
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THE PIIRTO PYRAMID OF TALENT DEVELOPMENT

THE PIIRTO PYRAMID OF TALENT DEVELOPMENT | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Since the identification of talent potential is not an exact science, we must seek to be inclusive rather than exclusive. The Piirto Pyramid framework may be helpful to allstudents and their teachers since it identifies influences that are significant in the development of talents. For example, one high school teacher of Advanced Placement English classes uses the Pyramid of Talent Development at the beginning of the year to establish a framework within which they will be learning more about literature. Others use the Pyramid in helping students do biographical studies of talented people; some find that the Piirto Pyramid is helpful in explaining to colleagues and parents where the school or home needs to puts its emphasis in helping develop students’ talents The framework is also useful for teachers in many fields who teach many grades.

 
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "In addition, everyone is influenced by five "suns." These suns may be likened to certain factors in the environment. They are the sun of home, the sun of school, the sun of community and culture, the sun of gender, and the sun of chance.

The three major suns refer to a child's being (1) in a positive and nurturing home environment, and (2) in a community and culture that conveys values compatible with the educational institution, and that provides support for the home and the school. The (3) school is a key factor, especially for those children whose other "suns" may have clouds in front of them. Other, smaller suns are (4) the influence ofgender, and (5) what chance can provide. The presence or absence of all or several of these make the difference between whether a talent is developed or whether it atrophies."

 

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A Definitive Guide to Teacher Checklists

A Definitive Guide to Teacher Checklists | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
In The Checklist Manifesto, Atul Gawande writes about the importance of list making as a process of working through critical decisions, and list reviewing as a critical element to support aspirations
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A Middle School Principal’s Perspective: Challenges to Scheduling a Multi-Tier System of Supports

A Middle School Principal’s Perspective: Challenges to Scheduling a Multi-Tier System of Supports | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
RTINetwork.org guides educators and families in the effective implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI) as a means to improve educational outcomes for all students.
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RtI Back to School Checklist

RtI Back to School Checklist | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
RTINetwork.org guides educators and families in the effective implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI) as a means to improve educational outcomes for all students.
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What Schools Can Do to Deal with Restraining Orders - A Checklist for School Officials - MassLegalHelp

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Leadership - Principal's Checklist for Low Performing Schools

Leadership - Principal's Checklist for Low Performing Schools | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Superintendents-E-Network is the first internet website established exclusively for school superintendents. Membership is expressly limited to sitting or retired superintendents.
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"High school students read far fewer words per year than their younger peers"

"High school students read far fewer words per year than their younger peers" | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
An examination of what students choose for their "outside" reading in grades 1 through 12 shows disconcerting patterns taking hold in middle school.

Via Mel Riddile
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Mel Riddile's curator insight, May 9, 2014 7:42 AM

"Another interesting common-core note, for those of you who are so into the weeds on this stuff that you know about Appendix B of the Common Core State Standards. That's the list of texts that the standards' authors suggest as examples of readings in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama that are appropriately complex at each grade level. Renaissance Learning's report shows that there has been an increase—albeit small—in the reading of those texts. Although the standards' authors didn't intend those lists as "assigned reading" lists, they appear to be having an effect on what teachers suggest to their students."

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“DRiVE” Me Crazy! - Intrinsic Motivation and Behaviorist, Aubrey Daniels

“DRiVE” Me Crazy! - Intrinsic Motivation and Behaviorist, Aubrey Daniels | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

We are “intrinsically motivated purpose maximizers” - ah, what?


In his new book, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, Dan Pink says that a new motivational operating system, what he calls Motivation 3.0, is needed for today’s business because what science has discovered is that people are “intrinsically motivated purpose maximizers.”  - 

 

The book jacket says, “He (Pink) demonstrates that while carrots and sticks worked successfully in the twentieth century, that’s precisely the wrong way to motivate people for today’s challenges.”

 

These kinds of statements drive me crazy.  What does “intrinsically motivated purpose maximizers” mean?  Did “carrot and stick” ever really work?

 

...Is it true that people in the caveman era were not creative? I am sure that the caveman of the television ads, “So easy a caveman can do it” fame would be offended.  Imagine the ‘thinking outside the box’ caveman who came upon the act of fire starting, and then repeated until finally controlling fire.  

 

- See more at: http://aubreydaniels.com/blog/2010/01/26/drive-me-crazy/#sthash.TtBSG3YX.dpuf


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 29, 2013 4:47 PM

I listened to a Dan Pink interview for the WBECS (World Business Executive Coaching Summit) conference and agree with Aubrey Daniel's assessment, even tho' I'm not much of a behaviorist.  See if you agree.

Sharrock's comment, May 8, 2014 10:10 AM
I'm having the same crazed frustration! Gamification is taking on the non-duality of motivation, and some researchers are questioning the validity of the so-called research supporting the duality and the idea the extrinsics diminish intrinsic motivation. Meanwhile, the Greek philosophers have explored hedonism (as motivation--not the resort) and philosophers have focused attention and thought on what motivates.