School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
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what are some effective interventions to reduce student chronic lateness (tardiness) at the high school level (in US schools)?Research Network Response | Wonder

what are some effective interventions to reduce student chronic lateness (tardiness) at the high school level (in US schools)?

Anna Olechowska writes: "I found a great case study that explores the strategies and practices used by schools to help reduce student tardiness. A traditional method included was "students being given one hour of detention and a letter was sent home at the fifth tardy level, suspended for three days at eleven tardies, suspended five days for sixteen tardies, and given ten days suspension for every five tardies past that level". It was found that suspensions were the most effective strategy while detentions were the least effective. Other strategies included "sweeping the hallways" for students still out of classrooms after the start of class, and having them sit in a "tardy room" to wait until the next class period. Any periods missed were to be made up after school hours. A less traditional method was to have the students create the tardy policy; a study claimed that the students felt they had ownership and authority over the policy if they helped create it, and thus they would follow it closely. Other schools provided incentives for punctual students such as movie trips to the movies or ice cream parties. The case study stressed that what would work for one school may not work for another school based on "such as school size, school location, minority enrollment, socioeconomic status, and gender". For example, the 'tardy room' worked for one school, but for a school in Los Angeles, where the minority population was high and the graduation rate low, students felt that they were falling behind if they were placed in a tardy room because they were given assignments that had no use when placed in the room. Thus, there may not be just one strategy that is most effective. I'll link you to other articles that study effective strategies for student tardiness and you can see what would work best in your school."

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Guide to Creating Mission & Vision Statements

Guide to Creating Mission & Vision Statements | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The second installment in this series centers around creating mission and vision statements. These principles hold true not only to those looking to create or evaluate a mission and vision statement for a volunteer program but for any other place were they are used.
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Systems Thinking For the Rest of Us - Tobias Fors - Let's Test 2013

SYSTEMS THINKINGFOR THE REST OF US@TOFO | CITERUS.SE | TOBIASFORS.SEtobias.fors@citerus.seWith inspiration from Ackoff,Weinberg, Checkland

Via Jürgen Kanz
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Create A Sense of Belonging

Create A Sense of Belonging | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Having a sense of belonging is a common experience. Belonging means acceptance as a member or part. Such a simple word for huge concept. A sense of belonging is a human need, just like the need for food and shelter. Feeling that you belong  is most important in seeing value in life and in coping with intensely painful emotions. Some find belonging in a church, some with friends, some with family, and some on Twitter or other social media. Some see themselves as connected only to one or two people. Others believe and feel a connection to all people the world over, to humanity. Some struggle to find a sense of belonging and their loneliness is physically painful for them. 

Some seek belonging through excluding others. That reflects the idea that there must be those who don't belong in order for there to be those who do. Yet a single instance of being excluded can undermine self-control and well being and often creates pain and conflict.

A sense of belonging to a greater community improves your motivation, health, andhappiness.  When you see your connection to others, you know that all people struggle and have difficult times. You are not alone. There is comfort in that knowledge.

 

Dr. Gregory Walton developed a belonging intervention he called Attributional Retraining
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Invented traditions

Invented traditions | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

In a now classic book containing a theoretical introduction by Eric Hobsbawm and a selection of case-studies, six historians and anthropologists argued that traditions which appear or claim to be ancient can be quite recent in origin and were sometimes literally invented in a single event or over a short time period (Hobsbawm and Ranger 1983). In his introduction, Eric Hobsbawm defined 'invented traditions' as follows (1983: 1f.):

 

"'Invented tradition' is taken to mean a set of practices, normally governed by overtly or tacitly accepted rules and of a ritual or symbolic nature, which seek to inculcate certain values and norms of behaviour by repetition, which automatically implies continuity with the past. In fact, where possible, they normally attempt to establish continuity with a suitable historic past.... However, insofar as there is such reference to a historic past, the peculiarity of 'invented' traditions is that the continuity with it is largely fictitious. In short, they are responses to novel situations which take the form of reference to old situations, or which establish their own past by quasi-obligatory repetition."

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Why People In Finance And Insurance Are The Unhappiest Employees

Why People In Finance And Insurance Are The Unhappiest Employees | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Three factors contribute to the lack of job satisfaction, despite security and high wages.
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The US needs a job market that can afford to take chances on unconventional hires

The US needs a job market that can afford to take chances on unconventional hires | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Bringing potential out into the open is essential to bringing America’s founding promise of opportunity through work into the 21st century.
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What’s in Your Creative Bag?

What’s in Your Creative Bag? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Work with what you have.
Sharrock's insight:

This is important advice. I've explored a great deal about what schools (secondary and post secondary) can help people learn and be able to do, and I've explored what they have not been able to help people learn. This short article does a lot. It encourages creatives to jump in and make it happen. Whatever they do to complete a project will result in being a learning experience. Skills will develop and will be developed; resourcefulness will get tested, collaboration and problem solving skills will get challenged. But in the end, you develop certain skills, you complete a project, and the finished product will be something you can use to encourage others to invest in you so that you can accomplish bigger projects. 

 

 

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Uncovering complex network structures in nature

Uncovering complex network structures in nature | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Several models have already been proposed to generate networks of interacting individuals with wildly varying connectivity. The most famous of these is known as preferential attachment and follows the social maxim of "the rich get richer". As time progresses, the individuals in the network with the most connections are the ones most likely to acquire new connections. Just as in the real world, wealth attracts still more wealth and societies develop with most people having little and a small minority having most of the resources.
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Lipstick Learning | Leadership Physiology - Your year ahead

Lipstick Learning | Leadership Physiology - Your year ahead | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Why is attitude going to define your year ahead? Having an attitude of happiness, positivity, gratitude, progress, care and abundance is an asset in all areas of life. In career and business your attitude has a massive impact on your ability to achieve your goals, to find happiness in the workplace and to be valued by your employer, colleagues and clients. In your relationship with family, friends and loved ones your attitude will define how people care for you and interact with you everyday. In health, your attitude will enable you to reach your goals and have energy and vitality. Every area of your life benefits enormously from the quality of your attitude no matter what your life story or circumstances are.
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Predictive Analytics in K-12: Advantages, Limitations & Implementation -- THE Journal via Mike beloy

Predictive Analytics in K-12: Advantages, Limitations & Implementation -- THE Journal via Mike beloy | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Predictive analytics is growing rapidly in popularity among school district leaders.
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Big Dog and Little Dog's Performance Juxtaposition

Big Dog and Little Dog's Performance Juxtaposition | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
A resource for human performance, leadership, learning, training, instructional design, and development.
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Nancy Duarte on Failure, Bootstrapping, and the Power of Better Presentations

Nancy Duarte on Failure, Bootstrapping, and the Power of Better Presentations | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Nancy Duarte on how she went from a college dropout to heading up her own communication firm.
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Fundamentals of Leadership: Communicating a Vision | Writing Assistance, Inc.

Fundamentals of Leadership: Communicating a Vision | Writing Assistance, Inc. | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
This management training article provided by Writing Assistance, Inc. covers the fundamentals of leadership - communicating a vision for your staff. Get support from your team, driveg effective projects, and get employees to perform their best.
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WHAT ARE THE COMMON FACTORS INCREASE EMPLOYEE RETENTION IN WORKPLACES AND STUDENT RETENTION IN SCHOOLS Research Network Response | Wonder

Brooke Petersen@brooke_p writes: "while the actual process of student retention seems to be different from that of employee retention, the principles are the same. People need to feel that they are contributing and that they are capable of attaining their personal goals. If they don't, they will be unsatisfied and want to change their approach to life, work, and education. In the workplace, having well-trained supervisors is brought up over and over. This provides your employees with a support system. In schools, the parallel is the faculty and academic advisors. These individuals must create a warm, validating atmosphere for students. Another repeated piece of advice for businesses is that they need to provide a path for employees to achieve their goals. This doesn't necessarily mean salary increases; rather, it may indicate moving to positions where they can use their skills more effectively. In schools, advisors must help students clarify their goals, because many students enter college without them. Once desires for the future are solidified, advisors can help students see how their education creates a pathway to achieve those desires. Finally, something echoed in both spheres is that businesses and schools must respect their employees and students as people with lives outside of work and school. This includes understanding when they cannot work extra hours, being reasonable with homework assignments, and generally being flexible and offering empathy when situations arise. In the end, employees and students are seeking places they will be respected and allowed to grow. When they feel this validation, they will be encouraged to stay."

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What does it take to change people's minds? | Game-Changer

What does it take to change people's minds? | Game-Changer | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
In his book “The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion“, Jonathan Haidt, a social psychologist at New York University, observes that most of the moral reasoning people do is oriented not towards discovering the truth, but towards justifying their beliefs to others in their social group. “Moral reasoning is more like a politician seeking votes than a scientist seeking truth,” Mr Haidt writes. “We are obsessively concerned about what others think of us.” For the most part, people select their moral beliefs the way they select their clothes, asking themselves whether this or that opinion is appropriate to their identity and how it will look to their friends. When they do engage in moral reasoning, they do it to justify taking the position necessary to fit in. If people’s moral stances are shifting rapidly, it is because they are getting signals from others in their group that a different belief is now acceptable.
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Lifelong Learner: Teaching methodology or teaching classroom pedagogy: where should the priority be?

Lifelong Learner: Teaching methodology or teaching classroom pedagogy: where should the priority be? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
 The simplest definition of pedagogy is the art of teaching. This definition shows that teaching is a creative skill, which has a social side that is teachers' interactions with their students. Watkins and Mortimer (1999) (as cited inCogill,  2008) define it as ‘any conscious activity by one person designed to enhance the learning of another’. In this definition implicates that pedagogy is a planned procedures and strategies that ensure avoiding haphazard actions. Leach and Moon (1999) (as cited in Cogill, 2008)described a Pedagogical Setting as ‘the practice that a teacher, together with a particular group of learners creates, enacts and experiences.’ Again, communication is considered as an advantage of pedagogy. This definition ensures the active roles of learners that pedagogical sitting provides. Cogill, (2008) suggests that this definition shows that the learner has an active role and draws light on the social interaction between teachers and learners. Garcia, (wisegeek.com) defines pedagogical teaching as strategies that are used by teachers in the classroom to deliver the knowledge of a subject depending on their skills. From this aspect, we can consider pedagogy as knowledge in many different forms such as knowledge of the content, knowledge of the teaching approaches, knowledge of the class management…etc. In the same article she mentioned that these strategies might include choosing methods, assessing learners, using outside resources from the society … Daw, (wisegeek.com) divided pedagogic skills into two types classroom management (managing students behavior)  and content-related (teaching content effectively). 
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A Nuclear Nightmare, Averted

A Nuclear Nightmare, Averted | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Library of Congress / Reuters This week, with little fanfare, one of the world’s key restraints on the spread of nuclear weapons came under scrutiny, as a month-long review of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) concluded at the United Nations.
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Why Compassion Is a Better Managerial Tactic than Toughness

Why Compassion Is a Better Managerial Tactic than Toughness | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
How should we react when an employee is not performing well or makes a mistake? How to respond when an employee messes up.

Via donhornsby, Roger Francis, Lynnette Van Dyke
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donhornsby's curator insight, May 11, 2015 10:48 AM

(From the article): When trust, loyalty, and creativity are high, and stress is low, employees are happier and more productive and turnover is lower. Positive interactions even make employees healthier and require fewer sick days. Other studies have shown how compassionate management leads to improvements in customer service and client outcomes and satisfaction.

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How to Fuel Collaboration & Innovation: 2015 99U Conference Recap 1

How to Fuel Collaboration & Innovation: 2015 99U Conference Recap 1 | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Don’t confuse outputs for outcomes. We often celebrate the outputs of our work. When something gets launched or when we cross another checkbox off of our to-do list. But by celebrating outputs instead of outcomes, we lose the spark of what motivated us to innovate in the first place. We don’t do what we do to cross items off a list, we do what we do because it has an impact. “Don’t get blinded by the output and celebrate the wrong win,” Reynolds stated. His example? Building a well isn’t what we celebrate. Instead, celebrate when the well is providing clean water and better health for an entire village.
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The Green Berets’ elite military training is the perfect preparation for a CEO

The Green Berets’ elite military training is the perfect preparation for a CEO | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Your next executive hire should be a retired special ops officer.
Sharrock's insight:
Author raises good points suggesting the ways special Ops officers have developed skills fitting needs in business.
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The Differences Between Data, Information and Knowledge :: Infogineering - Master Your Information

The Differences Between Data, Information and Knowledge :: Infogineering - Master Your Information | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Why does it matter that people mix them up?
When people confuse data with information, they can make critical mistakes. Data is always correct (I can’t be 29 years old and 62 years old at the same time) but information can be wrong (there could be two files on me, one saying I was born in 1981, and one saying I was born in 1948).
Information captures data at a single point. The data changes over time. The mistake people make is thinking that the information they are looking at is always an accurate reflection of the data.
By understanding the differences between these, you can better understand how to make better decisions based on the accurate facts.
In Brief
Data: Facts, a description of the World
Information: Captured Data and Knowledge
Knowledge: Our personal map/model of the World
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Myths Of Companies With No Management

Myths Of Companies With No Management | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
There are a lot of creative benefits to alternative management structures, but there are some downsides too. There is no completely egalitarian organization. There is always either a formally established hierarchy or an informal one based on peer powers and contributors and a lot of informal bosses. If you’re opting for the second kind, think through how it will work. There will always be people who have more or less power compared to the rest of the organization. This is because some people have more expertise in areas than others, and having a few decision makers is absolutely necessary. Not having traditional management doesn’t necessarily equate to no titles, but it often equates to having almost no titles. There is almost always a C-level team present with, at the very least, a CEO and COO. At Medium, that team is called the General counsel circle.
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Teacher: What I wish everyone knew about working in some high-needs schools

Teacher: What I wish everyone knew about working in some high-needs schools | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
'All I know is what I and others see at the front lines every day, and I just know that it’s not working—for students or their teachers. '
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The Collapse of Expertise and Rise of Collaborative Sensemaking

The Collapse of Expertise and Rise of Collaborative Sensemaking | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
If organizations are going to thrive in turbulent times, they must surrender many of their most cherished assumptions and start leveraging the power of collaborative knowledge. But this won’t be easy as most continue to believe in the same top-down knowledge management strategies common to the machine age.

In the social era, the power of collaboration is key and collaborative knowledge generation–or sensemaking–is essential for staying competitive amidst the messy, complex challenges that define our hyper-connected universe.

But there’s a glitch: paying workers to collaboratively solve problems and cultivate ideas flies right in the face of traditional management thinking and its belief that the only valid source of knowledge is authoritative expertise. So, clearly, a new understanding about knowledge and the role of expertise is needed.
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