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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
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The Myth Of Learning Styles - Edudemic

The Myth Of Learning Styles - Edudemic | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
After several years of writing for Edudemic, I'd have to say that one of the most controversial topics we've ever written about is the concept of different learning styles.
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Looking Good Trumps Health as Behavioral Motivator

Looking Good Trumps Health as Behavioral Motivator | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Teenagers who watched videos about skin damage from sun exposure used sunscreen far more than those who saw info about sun-caused skin cancer. Christopher Intagliata reports
Sharrock's insight:

Something to consider: "The study does have one limitation: teenagers are invincible. So they might always be prone to favor beauty over health. Still, the researchers say PSAs that combine both health and beauty messages could be just the thing to encourage older adults to change their ways. At least, those willing to listen."

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What is Giftedness?

What is Giftedness? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Men equate giftedness with achievement. After we tested his son, one Dad said to us, “He's only five. What could he have done in five years to be gifted?” Women, on the other hand, perceive giftedness as developmental advancement. If a Mom sees that her daughter is asking names of objects at 11 months, and memorizing books at 17 months, and asking complex questions before she's two years old, she gets very anxious. “How will she fit in with the other children?” “What will the teacher do with her if she's already reading in Kindergarten?” “Should I hide the books? I don't want them to think I'm another ‘pushy parent’.”


Sharrock's insight:

Males and females tend to define giftedness differently.

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5 Ways to Get Up to Speed on Anything Fast

5 Ways to Get Up to Speed on Anything Fast | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
You can't constantly monitor every development in your industry, but a few techniques can greatly expedite getting the knowledge you need.
Sharrock's insight:

A good short article to remind us of the importance of face to face, in-person experiences. 

 

excerpt: "Data Is No Substitute For Real Experience

IBM Global Consulting interviewed 1,500 chief marketing officers to determine how they were adapting to a rapidly changing business climate. The findings? The vast majority were drowning in data. Most admitted they had no time to experience their organization from the outside in. They had too much information and not enough knowledge."

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My view: Ten myths about gifted students and programs for gifted

My view: Ten myths about gifted students and programs for gifted | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
By Carolyn Coil, Special to CNN

Editor’s note: Carolyn Coil is a speaker, educator and author. She works with teachers, administrators, parents and students, offering strategies for raising achievement, developing creative and critical thinking skills, motivating underachievers, differentiating...
Sharrock's insight:

part of my exploration of gifted student education. 

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5 Characteristics Of Grit -- How Many Do You Have?

5 Characteristics Of Grit -- How Many Do You Have? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

The characteristics of grit outlined below include Duckworth’s findings as well as some that defy measurement. Duckworth herself is the first to say that the essence of grit remains elusive. It has hundreds of correlates, with nuances and anomalies, and your level depends on the expression of their interaction at any given point. Sometimes it is stronger, sometimes weaker, but the constancy of your tenacity is based on the degree to which you can access, ignite, and control it. So here are a few of the more salient characteristics to see how you measure up.

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Duckworth, based on her studies, tweaked this definition to be “perseverance and passion for long-term goals.” 

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Why the PISA Debates Are Misleading -- and Useful

Why the PISA Debates Are Misleading -- and Useful | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
If the PISA test results give us the impetus we need to truly prioritize academic education -- in our families, communities, governments, and schools -- then all the hype will be more than worthwhile.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Methinks the bloggers doth protest too much. China is not the issue. Chinese statistics are not the issue. The statistical issues Dillon and Fallows discuss may explain why Shanghai significantly topped scores from ALL non-Chinese nations tested. They don't explain why the United States ranked 25th in math, 17th in science, and 14th in reading out of 34 countries surveyed. Or why students across Europe excel in two languages (three in Finland, which also tops the science ratings) while ours score in English below countries for which English is not a native language."

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In PISA Test, Top Scores From Shanghai Stun Experts

In PISA Test, Top Scores From Shanghai Stun Experts | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

“The technical side of this was well regulated, the sampling was O.K., and there was no evidence of cheating,” he said.

Mr. Schneider, however, noted some factors that may have influenced the outcome.

For one thing, Shanghai is a huge migration hub within China. Students are supposed to return to their home provinces to attend high school, but the Shanghai authorities could increase scores by allowing stellar students to stay in the city, he said. And Shanghai students apparently were told the test was important for China’s image and thus were more motivated to do well, he said.

Sharrock's insight:

It's only stated as a possibility, but this made a statement. 

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Don't wake your kids to eat breakfast.

Don't wake your kids to eat breakfast. | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Last month, the Journal of the American Dietetic Association published the most comprehensive review to date of why kids and teenagers should eat breakfast. The article surveyed the results of 47 research papers published since 1970 and reported triumphantly that breakfast-eating seems to "improve cognitive function related to memory, test...
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "The case for circadian rhythms and sleep as key to performance has strong scientific grounding. Sleep researchers have shown that peoples' preferences for morning or evening activity—for being an early bird or a night owl—are partly genetic and can be apparent even early in life. The body's 24-hour cycles are mediated by a brain area called thesuprachiasmatic nucleus, located in the hypothalamus. Small substitutions, or polymorphisms, in several circadian clock genes seem to cause variations within the SCN that may contribute to distinct sleep patterns and time-of-day preferences. Factors like family routine can play a role; still, some people just rise and shine more easily than others."

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Bosses: Are People Laughing with You or at You?

Bosses: Are People Laughing with You or at You? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Everyone's a Critic

Office Humor

Business Strategy Review

 

Good news, all you talented office comics.

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Daniel Koretz's Plan to Fix the Education System - YouTube

Daniel Koretz sought to disabuse us of the myths surrounding testing and foster public debate about purpose in education.

 

Transcript (site provided)

Published on Apr 23, 2012

The number one priority for Daniel Koretz should be attracting and retaining skilled educators.

Daniel Koretz:
So, for example, in my view, one of the single most important things we have to do is to make teaching a more attractive profession.  There's a lot of argument about one piece of this, would pay for performance make teaching more or less appealing to the people we want to have teaching.  I think the jury is out on that.  But I think it's fair to say that, in general, the quality of the teaching force has taken second place in the current round of reforms.  There's an [edict] that we must somehow have highly qualified teachers everywhere.  But how do we get them?  You have to convince people to do it first and you have to convince them not to leave.  A lot of people leave teaching because they find it very stressful and an unsatisfying role.  So I think we need to go back to square 1 and say... Since we know that American education has some chronic deficiencies, what can we say about the causes of those deficiencies?  What can we say about the impediments that stand in the way of doing better?  And when we don't know, we ought to go and look.  We ought to go into schools, do hard research to figure out which of the impediments really matter.  And then, craft policies that try to chip away at those impediments.  Instead of doing what we've done for 30 years, which we just make it up, make up a policy, drop it on schools and see what happens.  Or more often than not, fail to see what happens because we drop these things into schools without putting in place the kind of monitoring that kids deserve.  In my view, it's not all that surprising that our reforms haven't been more effective than they had been today.

Daniel Koretz:
So, for example, in my view, one of the single most important things we have to do is to make teaching a more attractive profession.  There's a lot of argument about one piece of this, would pay for performance make teaching more or less appealing to the people we want to have teaching.  I think the jury is out on that.  But I think it's fair to say that, in general, the quality of the teaching force has taken second place in the current round of reforms.  There's an [edict] that we must somehow have highly qualified teachers everywhere.  But how do we get them?  You have to convince people to do it first and you have to convince them not to leave.  A lot of people leave teaching because they find it very stressful and an unsatisfying role.  So I think we need to go back to square 1 and say... Since we know that American education has some chronic deficiencies, what can we say about the causes of those deficiencies?  What can we say about the impediments that stand in the way of doing better?  And when we don't know, we ought to go and look.  We ought to go into schools, do hard research to figure out which of the impediments really matter.  And then, craft policies that try to chip away at those impediments.  Instead of doing what we've done for 30 years, which we just make it up, make up a policy, drop it on schools and see what happens.  Or more often than not, fail to see what happens because we drop these things into schools without putting in place the kind of monitoring that kids deserve.  In my view, it's not all that surprising that our reforms haven't been more effective than they had been today.

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Innovation

Today, technology is a significant driver behind change, and sometimes plays an important role in innovations in educational design and delivery. There are immense possibilities for greater and wider-spread change with the use of present-day technological advancements, as well as with the implementation of innovative educational programs. The challenge is to ensure that innovation plays a constructive role in improving educational opportunities for billions of people who remain under-served in a rapidly developing world.


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How to Train Your Mind to Think Critically and Form Your Own Opinions

How to Train Your Mind to Think Critically and Form Your Own Opinions | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
"Critical Thinking" may sound like an obnoxious buzzword from liberal arts schools, but it's actually a useful skill. Critical thinking just means absorbing important information and using that to form a decision or opinion of your own--rather than just spouting off what you hear others say. This doesn't always come naturally to us, but luckily, it's something you can train yourself to do better.
Sharrock's insight:

share this with your students, with colleagues, with friends. 

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Kappa (folklore) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kappa (folklore) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Kappa are similar to Finnish Näkki, Scandinavian/Germanic Näck/Neck, Slavian Vodník and Scottish Kelpie in that all have been used to scare children of dangers lurking in waters.

 
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What We Have Learned About Gifted Children

What We Have Learned About Gifted Children | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

The Gifted Development Center has been in operation since June, 1979, and we have assessed over 5,600 children in the last 30 years.  By concentrating totally on the gifted population, we have acquired a considerable amount of knowledge about the development of giftedness.  In 1994-1995, three noted researchers spent post-doctoral internships assisting us in coding our clinical data to enable statistical analysis:  Drs. Frank Falk and Nancy Miller of the University of Akron, and Dr. Karen Rogers of the University of St. Thomas.   Here are some of the highlights of what we have learned so far:

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: 

3. When parents fail to recognize a child’s gifts, teachers may overlook them as well.  Rita Dickinson (1970) found that half of the children she tested with IQs of 132 or above were referred for behavior problems and not seen as gifted by their teachers or parents.  Parent advocacy is critical for gifted children’s emotional and academic growth.  Associate Director, Bobbie Gilman’s (2008a) award-winning book, Academic Advocacy for Gifted Children: A Parent’s Complete Guide, can guide parents in effectively advocating for their children. Challenging Highly Gifted Learners (Gilman, 2008b) is an excellent book for teachers and parents."

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NAGC - Administrators - Administrator Toolbox

NAGC - Administrators - Administrator Toolbox | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Because of the increasing number of requests for information for administrators about high-ability and high-potential learners, NAGC convened a task force of administrators to develop concise videos, fact sheets, and supporting documents  -- tools that district leaders can use as briefing materials and as the starting point to advocate for and implement services for gifted students.

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5 Fictional Stories You Were Taught in History Class

5 Fictional Stories You Were Taught in History Class | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Forget about Stephanie Meyer or JK Rowling or Stephen King--at the end of the day, they just write stories and make billions of dollars.
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8 traits of successful entrepreneurs--Do you have what it takes? | MBDA Web Portal

8 traits of successful entrepreneurs--Do you have what it takes? | MBDA Web Portal | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The Minority Business Development Agency Web Portal

 

Successful entrepreneurs, from Henry Ford to Steve Jobs, share similar qualities with one another. To see how you rank against these distinguished entrepreneurs, do you share at least half of these qualities?

 

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The Sour Grapes of Pisa

The Sour Grapes of Pisa | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
  The new Pisa 2012 will be released on Tuesday, which for those who are unfamiliar with it is a recurrent survey on the performance of schoolchildren from all over the world. The winners in this s...
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The secret powers of time.

The secret powers of time. | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The secret powers of time.

Via Paige McClatchy
Sharrock's insight:

This is video explores the reasons why students are having difficulty staying interested in school, classes, and lecture format. There are a few generalizations, especially that students are playing video games so often. Screen immersion and interactivity could be "substituted" pretty easily with video gaming though.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 22, 2013 9:33 PM

Great video about the geography of time and how it translates into culture

Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 24, 2013 4:54 PM

Great little explination of how time and how we see time can effect even the smallest things we do. 

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A Periodic Table of Instructional Design

A PERIODIC TABLE OF INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN: A unique, graphical presentation of Instructional Design Concepts in a concise and structured manner. We hope this is useful for the Instructional Design and Elearning Community.

Via k3hamilton
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Allison Anderson's curator insight, February 22, 2014 11:25 AM

This is both a great example of engaging content and a useful job aide.

 

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5 Reasons to Calm Down Your Analytical Mind

5 Reasons to Calm Down Your Analytical Mind | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Your analytical mind comes with both advantages and disadvantages. There are certain situations where it's better to calm down too much thinking and rationality.
Sharrock's insight:

This is part of a useful cycle. You race the analytical mind to absorb knowledge and to explore information. Then you run the creative, associative mind to find connections between personal experiences, observations, and information. But too much of anything can be bad.

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Usable Knowledge: Measure for measures: What do standardized tests really tell us about students and schools?

Usable Knowledge: Measure for measures: What do standardized tests really tell us about students and schools? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
In this Usable Knowledge video interview, HGSE Professor Daniel Koretz shares insights about the strengths and limitations of standardized tests from his new book, Measuring up: What educational testing really tells us.
Sharrock's insight:

Use "Daniel Koretz" in Youtube to find video clips of him explaining his ideas and insights. 

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Lessons Learned from 1,125 Flipped Classrooms (EdSurge News)

Lessons Learned from 1,125 Flipped Classrooms (EdSurge News) | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
When the military draft ended, the U.S. Army found that its volunteers were largely high school dropouts and high school graduates with poor academic records.
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