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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
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Educational Leadership - Expecting Excellence: Rigor Redefined

Educational Leadership - Expecting Excellence: Rigor Redefined | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.

Via John R. Walkup
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John R. Walkup's curator insight, January 27, 2014 12:40 PM

A short article on rigor, with input from industrial managers.  The role of questioning in rigor is raised, as well as collaboration, leadership, agility, adaptibility, initiative, entrepreneurialism, oral/written communication, accessing/analyzing information, and curiousity/imagination.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 29, 2014 8:29 PM

I like the word vigour. It fits with life. I agree we need new education and that is not a new package with technology as the add-on. It is a whole new way of thinking i.e. a Kuhnian paradigm shift.

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To Inspire Learning, Architects Reimagine Learning Spaces

To Inspire Learning, Architects Reimagine Learning Spaces | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
As schools refocus on team-based, interdisciplinary learning, they're moving away from standardized, teach-to-test programs that assume a one-size-fits-all approach to teaching.

Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
Sharrock's insight:
Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's insight:

Learning spaces are evolving into multi use laboratories where students can master skills collaboratively, and from their own skill set.  These play based elementary schools are a throwback to our past :)  

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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, January 28, 2014 11:16 AM

Learning spaces are evolving into multi use laboratories where students can master skills collaboratively, and from their own skill set.  These play based elementary schools are a throwback to our past :)  

Malcolm Allan's curator insight, January 29, 2014 4:29 AM

Interesting how the use of gaming technologies is changing the delivery of education and the planning of school spaces.

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The Learning Analyst | TC Media Center

The Learning Analyst | TC Media Center | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Baker and TC faculty colleagues focus on the exploding field of educational data mining (EDM), which uses advanced computer technologies to sift through huge amounts of data generated by intelligent tutoring systems and other online learning environments for information on how learners behave.  As Baker detailed in his MOOC, data mining – already a staple of the medical, financial services and retail worlds – can reveal why an individual student is getting the wrong answers to a subtraction problem; guide a teacher on how to make the best use of classroom time by pinpointing which homework problem stumped the most students the night before; and tell a superintendent which science curriculum is proving most effective with students across the district.    

 

These are issues that Baker, Associate Professor of Cognitive Studies, has won international recognition for probing.  At 36, he has published more than 150 peer-reviewed papers on the use of EDM that range from assessing boredom and cheating among students who use online tutoring systems to the mining of educational data to better understand metacognition, motivation and self-regulated learning. His ultimate focus is on creating computer-based environments in which users learn because they are genuinely engaged in their work. 

 
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: 

While he has only just begun to look at the data on his own MOOC, Baker is ready to share some anecdotal evidence about the efficacy of MOOC instruction.  Among his observations:

MOOCs are an excellent vehicle for introductory material. Many introductory courses are given by teaching assistants relatively new to teaching. By contrast, MOOC lecturers have to be subject matter experts who carefully hone their lectures and continuously work to improve them.MOOCs fill an educational void when subjects are locally unavailable. Programs in educational data mining, for example, existed in about five cities worldwide before Baker made his course available to anybody with a computer and Internet connection.MOOCs can be a vessel to interest students in more formal education programs, such as TC’s Masters in Cognitive Studies in Education (Focus in Learning Analytics) in the Department of Human Development.

The big question, of course, concerns how MOOC instruction compares with in-classroom learning. Baker takes a measured approach. He thinks MOOCs in their current state will not dominate education partly because of enrollment fall-off rates, but also because MOOCs have been made into an educational hybrid. The lectures, Baker says, are “mostly pretty good,” while homework assignments are not yet as effective.  Baker cautions against making the MOOC all things to all people.

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Best Way to Be Luckier in Your Career

Best Way to Be Luckier in Your Career | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Everyone wants a stroke of luck in their career. Here's how to create your own.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: If you want to be luckier in your career, you need to develop some skills. I built The G.L.O.W. Method years ago as a way to teach clients how to create their own career luck. Here's what you need to be skilled at doing to improve your career:

G - Gain Perspective
L - Luminate The Goal
O - Own Your Actions
W - Work It Daily

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Robert Fisher Teaching Thinking homepage

This article explores what metacognition is, why it is important and how it develops in children. It argues that teachers need to help children develop metacognitive awareness, and identifies the factors which enhance metacognitive development. Metacognitive thinking is a key element in the transfer of learning. The child's development of metacognitive skills is defined as meta-learning. Meta-teaching strategies can help mediate the metacognitive skills of children, help to stimilate children's metacognitive thinking. The article draws upon reserch currently being undertaken in London schools on raising achievement in thinking and learning through developing the metacognition of children as learners in schools.


Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Brown claims that two versions of metacognition are often confused, namely 'the essential distinction between self regulation during learning' and 'knowledge of, or even mental experimentation with, one's own thoughts' (Brown et al 1983). Adey & Shayer (1994) agree with this distinction, which they categorise as going beyond, and going above, the present learning behaviour. Going beyond one's present repertoire of reasoning is linked to 2,3 and 4 in Brown's list above. This can be equated with what Newman et al (1989) call 'construction zone activity', a concept derived from Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development, which refers to mental activity, usually of a collaborative nature, which involves children going beyond their present levels of competence. 

 
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5 Great Tools That Showcase Your Skills To Recruiters

5 Great Tools That Showcase Your Skills To Recruiters | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
It has been widely documented that recruiters spend about 6-seconds on the average resume. It is no wonder; they are flooded with resumes on a daily basis.
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Evaluating Teachers More Strategically | Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching

Evaluating Teachers More Strategically | Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
DC staffer Taylor White's issue brief on teacher evaluation featured in Politico.
http://t.co/5AWhTIs0Zg
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Don't Screw Up Your Gamification Strategy

Don't Screw Up Your Gamification Strategy | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Gamification is not just about adding games to work activities, but is the broader field of behavior analysis through loyalty and motivational techniques, measured and constantly fine-tuned to reward the right behaviors. - See more at: http://www.aiim.org/community/blogs/expert/Dont-Screw-Up-Your-Gamification-Strategy#sthash.8PSiH3GV.dpuf

Sharrock's insight:

A few broad tips and thoughts. The definition and context are valuable. We can adapt these ideas to education, educational environments, and activities. 

 

Important excerpt: "everyone loves the idea of automating systems to drive employee behavior, but few then understand what it takes to build out such a solution, maintain and monitor its progress, refine as needed, and then measure the benefits achieved. - See more at: http://www.aiim.org/community/blogs/expert/Dont-Screw-Up-Your-Gamification-Strategy#sthash.8PSiH3GV.dpuf

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This column will change your life: consistency bias

This column will change your life: consistency bias | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
'Believing that change happens only to your environment, or other people, makes life harder to navigate,' says Oliver Burkeman
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10 Years of Silence: How long it took Mozart, Picasso and Kobe Bryant to be Successful

10 Years of Silence: How long it took Mozart, Picasso and Kobe Bryant to be Successful | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
How long does it take to become elite at your craft? And what do the people who master their goals do differently than the rest of us? That’s what John Hayes, a cognitive psychology professor at Carnegie Mellon University, wanted to know.

Via Ryan Hines
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Ryan Hines's curator insight, January 20, 2014 2:50 PM

I tend not to collect these types of articles but this one jumped out at me with its emphasis on focus and experience.

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Are gifted students slighted in schools?

The American public school system’s focus on struggling students leaves high-achievers without a challenging enough education—a detriment to the country in a time of concerns over international compet...
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "A 2011 Fordham Institute study found that between 30 and 50 percent of advanced students descend and no longer achieve at the most advanced levels."

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20 Funniest Sports Faces

20 Funniest Sports Faces | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
While athletes are in motion trying to win the game, photographers are making a living out of the most unflattering photos they can get.

Via F. Thunus
Sharrock's insight:

One of these pictures just has to make it into a presentation for some kind of reason.

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Reduce Bias In Analysis By Using A Second Language

Reduce Bias In Analysis By Using A Second Language | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

In a world where the majority of analysts are bi- if not multi-lingual, the question of how language affects both the analytic process and analytic product is an important one. Emotion, language processing and cognitive biases aside, the intriguing question remains: Would you make the same decision in English as you would in, say, Chinese? Most analysts would likely answer yes to this question, but recent research led by Boaz Keysar out of the University of Chicago suggests otherwise.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
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Bonnie Hohhof's curator insight, November 19, 2013 5:51 PM

another great post by Kris Wheaton

Estefanía Aguilar's curator insight, November 26, 2013 6:06 AM

Language knowledge is important for everything!!!

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Leadership Turns On the Lights

Leadership Turns On the Lights | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
I have worked with people who seemed to think their authority came from keeping the rest of us in the dark. They told us only what they thought we needed to know. They withheld information that would have helped us do a better job.

Via Ryan Hines
Sharrock's insight:

Transparency is more complex than people tend to believe. It applies to how information/data is chosen, why it is relevant to the problem solving and decision making. Transparency also applies to the processes of problem solving, related concerns, laws/regulations/policies restricting certain actions, and can include domain specific conventions and strategies that may not be easily grasped in a sentence or two. Charts and graphs are only a small piece to the facilitation of transparency.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 29, 2014 1:53 PM

It is a great metaphor. It is not just leaving people in the dark it is about surprising them as well. With the lights on we have a chance to see where the next step might land.

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A Wonderful Free Classroom Poster on Digital Citizenship ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

A Wonderful Free Classroom Poster on Digital Citizenship ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Via Anna Hu
Sharrock's insight:

simple picture with many implications for health, security, safety, and education

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Medical Mysteries by Sandra G. Boodman - The Washington Post

Medical Mysteries by Sandra G. Boodman - The Washington Post | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The Washington Post's Sandra G. Boodman is looking for challenging medical cases--ones that have been resolved but in which the patient's symptoms were puzzling to doctors or suggested an immediate diagnosis that would have been wrong.
Sharrock's insight:

These are medical, but School Leaders can learn from these stories when puzzling over student mysteries in child study meetings (Response to Intervention student studies groups) or CSE meetings. Key ideas are commitment (!), experience, expertise, dignostics, and training. But trust and perseverence also come to mind. Some skills are purely medical or clinical, but there when do we know for sure when we can't support a student within the school setting? Something to think about.

 

In some ways, better than TV because they are real. Some of the tv show episodes were apparently based on one or two of these articles. Some bring to mind what Daniel Kahneman states about expert intuition in Thinking, Fast and Slow: "Intuition is nothing more and nothing less than recognition." Daniel Sivers also noted from the book "Valid intuitions develop when experts have learned to recognize familiar elements in a new situation and to act in a manner that is appropriate to it." 

 

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Intensive Small-Group Tutoring and Counseling Helps Struggling Students

Intensive Small-Group Tutoring and Counseling Helps Struggling Students | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
A study of struggling African-American high school students in Chicago found that providing focused guidance sharply improved learning, but the approach is a costly one to replicate.
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The Top 75 New York Times Best-Selling Education Books of 2013 - NYTimes.com

The Top 75 New York Times Best-Selling Education Books of 2013 - NYTimes.com | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
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Healing Power of Humor - PS3 Trophies Forum

Healing Power of Humor - PS3 Trophies Forum | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Laugh out loud; laughter can bring great wonde rs humor therapy is the best example of how a laugh can make wonders happen in life. To put in simple.
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How to Not Be a Weenie Leader | Eblin Group

How to Not Be a Weenie Leader | Eblin Group | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
RT @DianeEblin How to Not Be a Weenie Leader http://t.co/YMgWlEOJe0 fr @scotteblin #leadership // Not weenie - It's ineffective!
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List of Nobel laureates by country - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of Nobel laureates by country - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The present list ranks laureates under the country/countries that are stated by the Nobel Prize committee on its website. The list does not distinguish between laureates who got a full prize and the majority who got just a fraction of a prize.

Sharrock's insight:

I wonder if the PISAs offer valid indicators or predictors of military thinking and strategic skills or even for creativity. It strikes me that the USA still has the highest number of Nobel Prize Winners (http://www.whichcountry.co/top-10-countries-with-most-nobel-prize-winners-in-the-world/, orhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nobel_laureates_by_country). I wonder how this is explained? We could look at Nobel Science Winners per capita to consider other measureshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Nobel_laureates_per_capita. We could and should also research innovations and patents in terms of quantity and quality. I'm wondering about the quality of education may have a few more frames with which to really address the true issues of education in public schools (elementary or secondary) or in higher education (colleges and universities). However, this is not research I have done. I think getting to valid and useful answers will need some high levels of research skills and access.  less… 

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SchoolCIO Blogs - DAILY INSIGHT: Three words to avoid

SchoolCIO Blogs - DAILY INSIGHT: Three words to avoid | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
SchoolCIO Advisors Blog
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The Death Of Expertise

The Death Of Expertise | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
To reject the notion of expertise, and to replace it with a sanctimonious insistence that every person has a right to his or her own opinion, is silly.

Via Ryan Hines
Sharrock's insight:

There isn't so much a "death of expertise" as there is a greater drive for individuals to question the gatekeepers. Malcolm Gladwell explores this in with how people interact with their doctors and has found class differences. The knowledge era has been described by Michael Maccoby as having different kinds of social character: the interactive social character. And in this era, employees usually have more expertise than their supervisors do. The Dunning-Kruger effect is a cognitive bias that can also come into play, but there are also new messages coming from the very experts that are mentioned as "dying"--influencers share stories about the limitations of organizational capacity and cultures. There are trade-offs for hiring an expert from outside of the organization, they explain to varying degrees. Then there is the drive for transformative leadership (or servant leadership paradigms) towards transparency, communication, and collaboration.


In Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman has also shared that experts fail at long terms predictions. They might get it right in the "short term", but people looking for sooth seers are expecting too much. 

 

Next, despite one's expertise, a great deal of research supports that algorithms and checklists are more reliable (refer to the work of Paul Meehl). That's partly because experts are human beings who, due to various biases and fallibility, take short cuts, fail to follow well established procedures, and will sometimes reject data to fall prey to halo effects and other cognitive biases. Experts are more effective with the help of checklists and algorithms, but are less effective, less acccurate, without them. 

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Ryan Hines's curator insight, January 22, 2014 2:50 PM

Tom Nichols explores how the extinction of gatekeepers (or at least their disappearance from public discourse) and the democratization of knowledge that comes with it has unleased some rather ugly beasts. Does this endanger thought leaders? The author puts forward a few 'rules of the road' for those of us who engage with experts.

 

Bonus: the Dunning-Kruger effect, a particular blend of overconfidence and incompetence. 

Sharrock's comment, January 22, 2014 3:06 PM
There isn't so much a "death of expertise" as there is a greater drive for individuals to question the gatekeepers. Malcolm Gladwell explores this in with how people interact with their doctors and has found class differences. The knowledge era has been described by Michael Maccoby as having different kinds of social character: the interactive social character. And in this era, employees usually have more expertise than their supervisors do. The Dunning-Kruger effect is a cognitive bias that can also come into play, but there are also new messages coming from the very experts that are mentioned as "dying"--influencers share stories about the limitations of organizational capacity and cultures. There are trade-offs for hiring an expert from outside of the organization, they explain to varying degrees. Then there is the drive for transformative leadership (or servant leadership paradigms) towards transparency, communication, and collaboration.
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How to personalize learning

How to personalize learning | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Those who have made the transition from teacher-led instruction to student-driven education say it is a difficult process.
Sharrock's insight:

Technology is not enough, but technology is your friend. It can help, but ultimately, relationships or important. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 22, 2014 1:04 PM

It is not clear what is meant by help teachers adjust to change. Does this mean teachers are given autonomy to make changes they feel need to be made to help students? I don't see that happening. It would shake up the status quo and those outside the classroom would not want that.

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30 Positive Reframes: How to Start Changing Your Perspective on Life

Learn 30 positive reframes when it comes to thinking about yourself and others.
Sharrock's insight:

How do you train teachers and school staff in describing student behaviors? Exhaustion and stress can make descriptions of people negative. This list helps make better word choices.


excerpt: "Try to think of this list as a resource to help you think more positively. It won’t make you a master of positive reframes, but it is a great starting point to get you thinking in a different direction."

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