School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
Curated by Sharrock
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» “I Think I Can, I Think I Can” How Self-Efficacy Relates to Performance - Adventures in Positive Psychology

» “I Think I Can, I Think I Can” How Self-Efficacy Relates to Performance - Adventures in Positive Psychology | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

“ Do you know the story of The Little Engine that Could? “As it neared the top of the grade, which had so discouraged the larger engines, it went more slowly. However, it still kept saying, I--think--I--can, I--think--I--can.”


Via Jamie Williamson, Brad Merrick
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Brad Merrick's curator insight, March 20, 2014 11:36 AM
The importance of the inner voice in telling ourselves we can do it!
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The Proven Power of Self Efficacy and How to Use It to Get Healthy

The Proven Power of Self Efficacy and How to Use It to Get Healthy | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

“The extent to which you believe in yourself (your level of self efficacy) has massive implications on almost everything you do, including your health. (Really interesting look at how self-efficacy impacts health.”


Via Brad Merrick
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Brad Merrick's curator insight, March 31, 2014 5:48 AM
Bandura, Dweck - all my favourites bundled into one! So true that our own belief in any task is a determinant of success. Important life skill to remain positive and adopt a growth mindset.
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More Than Half of Students 'Engaged' in School, Says Poll

More Than Half of Students 'Engaged' in School, Says Poll | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
A new report from Gallup Education shows just how powerful schools and teachers can be in motivating students to take an active role in the classroom.
Sharrock's insight:

This is more about engagement and motivation. Read carefully that this reports refers to school climate, learning, hope for the future, positive approaches, and passion.

 

excerpt: "Students who have teachers who make them “feel excited about the future” and who attend schools that they see as committed to building their individual strengths are 30 times more likely than other students to show other signs of engagement in the classroom—a key predictor of academic success, according to a report released Wednesday by Gallup Education."

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The Thinker Behind “Grit” Says Teachers Need Grit, Too

The Thinker Behind “Grit” Says Teachers Need Grit, Too | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

 

What is it that sets people with grit apart? Robertson-Craft and Duckworth describe their key characteristic this way: “Gritty individuals work  diligently towards very challenging, long-term goals, sustaining commitment when confronted with setbacks and adversity.”

 

That sounds like a quality that would be immensely useful in teaching—and many other professions.

 


Via Gust MEES, Bobby Dillard, Ivon Prefontaine
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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 11, 2014 11:35 PM


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Grit


Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 12, 2014 4:26 AM

Without resiliency, without grit, we cannot recover and move forward learning from mistakes. Teachers need grit. The very work we do calls on us to be resilient and lead students with our words and actions when we make a mistake.

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Stranger in a Strange Land: Agency Skills in a Corporate World - ERE.net

Stranger in a Strange Land: Agency Skills in a Corporate World - ERE.net | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Indeed, companies hire executive search firms for this very reason: they need a pirate but can’t afford to have one associated with their brand. So they contract an outside vendor and gain the skills while sparing the brand.

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "When their approach to recruiting butts up against layers of bureaucracy, they realize they’re in a land where process and predictability are prized over results. It’s more important to ensure that the process shows that every candidate was treated equally than to get a hire. Mediocrity is acceptable, and they are handcuffed with no way to use their skills. In short, their creative, aggressive strengths are at odds with an HR culture. The bottom line realization is that if you’re really talented, you’ll leave."

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7 Brilliant Strategies Marissa Mayer Used to Shake Up Yahoo

7 Brilliant Strategies Marissa Mayer Used to Shake Up Yahoo | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Here are a handful of ways the female CEO and former Googler has changed the company's culture and business.
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Myths vs. Facts | Common Core State Standards Initiative

Myths vs. Facts | Common Core State Standards Initiative | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Successful implementation of the Common Core State Standards requires parents, educators, policymakers, and other stakeholders to have the facts about what the standards are and what they are not. The following myths and facts aim to address common misconceptions about the development, intent, content, and implementation of the standards.

 
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 3, 2014 6:40 PM

Common standards, in whatever we understand their design, are mediated in the classroom if learning happens. Teachers and students bring their curricula, in the form of autobiographies and expectations with them, into the classrooms. These are lenses and filters which act on any curricula designed and prescribed from outside the classroom.

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How Gamification Uncovers Nuance In The Learning Process

How Gamification Uncovers Nuance In The Learning Process | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
How Gamification Uncovers Nuance In The Learning Process by Terry Heick Gamification is simply the application of “game” mechanics to non-game entities. The big idea…
Sharrock's insight:

This is a powerful point about gamification and how it is misunderstood"

Misunderstanding Gamification

The current issue around the idea is less about definition, and more about tone. Reducing the process of “gamification” to something whimsical, silly, or juvenile represents a fundamental misunderstanding of gamification as a process. For years, classrooms have been gamified. Letter grades are indeed first subjective evaluations of knowledge proficiency, but once they are passed to the hands of the students, they become game components, passed around as proof of the completion of some task, or the achievement of some desired goal (mastering a standard, fulfilling the requirements of an assignment, etc. Here, rubrics become instructions to task completion."

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Adding Coding to the Curriculum

Adding Coding to the Curriculum | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Around the world, students from elementary school to the Ph.D. level are increasingly getting acquainted with the basics of computer coding.

Via Angie Tarasoff
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Angie Tarasoff's curator insight, March 28, 2014 5:29 PM

Despite a career background in programming, I feel strongly that a myopic focus on teaching coding in schools will not meet long term social needs for an educated population.


There is tremendous value in kids learning how to identify and solve problems in creative ways, but focusing on coding over-privileges one approach. Not every solution to a problem is a technology solution.


Nor do we require all people to be coders.


We also need architects, carpenters, plumbers, electricians, mechanics, writers, chefs, welders and farmers.


Our education system currently is designed to graduate students who will attend unversity - yet only 20% of students follow this path. In the meatime, here in Alberta, skilled trades jobs go unfilled.


Teach problem identification and problem solving.


And teach that there are MANY ways of doing this.

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The Humor Code

The Humor Code | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Over the past five years, at the Leeds School of Business at the University of Colorado, Boulder, researchers have been giving subjects some funny tasks. Rate the comedy of a joke about a kitten used as a sex toy.
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4 Things No One Tells You About Business Partnerships

4 Things No One Tells You About Business Partnerships | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
With the right combination of people, a business partnership can help a startup create a well-rounded leadership team. Here are some tips for making it work.
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Cybergogue: A Critique of Connectivism as a Learning Theory

Cybergogue: A Critique of Connectivism as a Learning Theory | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
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Why It Requires a Community To Transform Education For the 21st Century

Why It Requires a Community To Transform Education For the 21st Century | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Source: EdTechReview
Image Courtesy
It is hard to imagine a time when the opportunity and need to transform education has been greater.

Via Dean J. Fusto, Ivon Prefontaine
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 15, 2014 5:59 PM

And, community should not be understood as teams where someone at the top decides the agenda and what is to be achieved. Community also suggests that there are multiple communities which influence members and each other.

Begoña Iturgaitz's curator insight, March 18, 2014 10:02 PM

Thoughtful insight that helps trainers to focus on relevant aspects when working with teachers

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26 Keys to Student Engagement

26 Keys to Student Engagement | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

When we show kids our zeal and passion for what we believe in, we welcome them to share their own. Love what you do, and present it with zeal everyday! Even if it is the 100th time you have presented it, remember it is the first for these students!


Via Brad Merrick
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Brad Merrick's curator insight, March 30, 2014 12:20 PM
Very clever and well considered article on the 26 keys to student engagement. Love the use of the Alphabet as the acronym.
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Self-Efficacy and Locus of Control

Self-Efficacy and Locus of Control | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

“Leadership is a dying art in the world today. The great leaders of the past are found few-and-far between these days. There are some that have been fairly successful that have rose to an iconic sta...”


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Brad Merrick's curator insight, March 31, 2014 5:52 AM
Always important to draw upon self efficacy and experience in leadership roles. Important to continually evaluate how you are doing.
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The Importance of Grit in Students Infographic

The Importance of Grit in Students Infographic | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

The Department of Education is recognizing the importance of grit by calling for educational programs that will help students of all ages develop this key characteristic. Academic studies have identified grit as a success factor in contexts as diverse as the National Spelling Bee, West Point,... http://elearninginfographics.com/the-importance-of-grit-in-students-infographic/


Via elearninginfographic
Sharrock's insight:

Are researchers catching on that Grit is evolved from Bandura's self-efficacy and psychological resilience?


The study of resilience reveals that resilience is acquired from experiences as well as from learning. They are sometimes referred to as factors and skills. This is at the heart of acquiring "grit" which a mature form of self-efficacy if self-efficacy is viewed on an maturation/developmental scale.

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Sharrock's comment, April 6, 2014 3:58 PM
Are researchers catching on that Grit is evolved from Bandura's self-efficacy and psychological resilience?
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The Personality Traits Employers Look for Most in Job Candidates

The Personality Traits Employers Look for Most in Job Candidates | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Your personality and how you fit into a company's culture could be even more important than the skills you possess .
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Adolescents’ development of skills for agency in youth programs : The Chronicle of Evidence-Based Mentoring

Adolescents’ development of skills for agency in youth programs : The Chronicle of Evidence-Based Mentoring | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

Results:

What youth learned: The analyses of youth interviews revealed 3 major themes for types of youth agency skills:

1) Mobilizing effort:learning to devote the energy and time to their work

- common theme reveals that successful work requires effort and they had gained abilities to deliberately mobilize and regulate that effort

2) Concrete organizing skills: learning rules to organize the tasks or elements of their projects

3) Strategic thinking:  “use of advanced executive skills to anticipate possible scenarios in the steps to achieving goals and to formulate flexible courses of action that take these possibilities into account”

- strategic thinking directs youth toward achievement of meaningful and challenging real-world goals and away from risk behavior (Romer, 2003).

 

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Self-efficacy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Self-efficacy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Self-efficacy is the extent or strength of one's belief in one's own ability to complete tasks and reach goals. Psychologists have studied self-efficacy from several perspectives, noting various paths in the development of self-efficacy; the dynamics of self-efficacy, and lack thereof, in many different settings; interactions between self-efficacy and self-concept; and habits of attribution that contribute to, or detract from, self-efficacy.

Sharrock's insight:

In what ways are Duckworth's Grit research findings similar to Bandura's efficacy (or self-efficacy). How are they different? Are they related?

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Games are just another storytelling device

Games are just another storytelling device | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Whenever people talk about games as a potential journalistic device, there is a reaction against the idea of 'play' as a method for communicating 'serious' news. Malcolm Bradbrook's post on the New...
Sharrock's insight:

Powerful message about games!

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One Sentence Interventions

One Sentence Interventions | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Well hardly magic, but I’ve noticed that these phrases can really help to diffuse one-on-one situations with a student that are about to escalate into a problem. When discussing negative student...
Sharrock's insight:
these and similar are highly effective. the underlying concept is why it works.
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Simple, Objective Ways to Know You're Overworked

Simple, Objective Ways to Know You're Overworked | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Sometimes it’s obvious we need a break, but in most cases we figure it out too late.When you work double-digit hours and Sundays are no longer a day of rest, feeling overworked can become the new
Sharrock's insight:

some simple -- but good -- advice

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Basic-skills exam for teachers remains despite efforts to scrap it - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Basic-skills exam for teachers remains despite efforts to scrap it - Minneapolis Star Tribune | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Minneapolis Star Tribune Basic-skills exam for teachers remains despite efforts to scrap it Minneapolis Star Tribune Legislative efforts to repeal a controversial test for Minnesota's aspiring teachers have all but sputtered out this year, but...
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63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World

63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World

by Terry Heick

It could be argued—and probably argued well—that what a student fundamentally needs to know today isn’t much different than what Tom Sawyer or Joan of Arc or Alexander the Great needed to know.

Communication.

Resourcefulness.

Creativity.

Persistence.

How true this turns out to be depends on how macro you want to get. If we want to discuss our needs as humans in broad, sweeping themes, then food, water, shelter, connectivity, safety, and some degree of self-esteem pretty much cover it.

But in an increasingly connected and digital world, the things a student needs to know are indeed changing—fundamental human needs sometimes drastically redressed for an alien modern world. Just as salt allowed for the keeping of meats, the advent of antibiotics made deadly viruses and diseases simply inconvenient, and electricity completely altered when and where we slept and work and played, technology is again changing the kind of “stuff” a student needs to know.

Of course, these are just starters. Such a list really could go on forever.

Sharrock's insight:

The list of "changing things they (and we) need to know" is a "macro" list, just as the author states. For example, educators need to recognize that critical thinking is made up of many skills: focusing, information gathering, remembering, organizing, analyzing, inferring, predicting, elaborating, representing, integrating, and evaluating skills. It is the same case with creativity and persistence. Maybe some of the critical skills I have listed would cross over into creativity skills and persistence. In fact, it seems that the critical thinking skills I have listed might be involved in many of the "13 Categories and 63 Ideas" that the author has listed.  That's the thing about a macro list--there are pieces that make up a whole. And that issue for me seems to be the point about education. The skills students learn can be applied toward different outcomes. Some of the skills are taught and retaught in different ways in different classes/subjects with the different applications those skills can be most appropriately used.

 

My main suggestion is just that some of the outcomes may need to be reviewed and possibly reframed away from rote-goals into explorations of skills and experiences that may (or may not) guide the students to similar conclusions.  For example, "Popularity is dangerous" might ultimately get communicated in a lecture. You would not set up a lesson based on constructionist ideas since these ideas work on constructing knowledge but are basically exploratory in nature. The author might suggest that teachers offer learning activities exploring the "dangers and challenges of popularity" or exploring "celebrity" in the professional/political world or designing ways to maintain safety and health of public figures or politicians (or defining popular students with pros and cons then developing needs and protocols to address those needs).  My point is, the conclusion may then be didactic but problem solving might support the message that "Popularity is dangerous." We might do the same thing with rules and laws--by setting up students to experience a lawless classroom, they come to the conclusion that laws/rules are valuable. In secondary classrooms, an inquiry-based activity into the recent Bitcoin problems in Japan to come to the conclusion that rules and laws are necessary. 

 

However, I do agree that these are important lessons as skills to develop and for information to have. 

 

I was intrigued with the “Socializing ideas” section. The topics listed in this section includes “13.) The consequences of sharing an idea; 14.) The right stage of the creative process to share an idea; 15.) That everything digital is accelerated; plan accordingly. And this kind of acceleration doesn’t always happen in the brick-and-mortal world—and that’s okay.” These are powerful points to explore and reflect on. What are the consequences of sharing an idea? We are learning about the power of connectivism and social learning activities/environments (Vygotsky, included). But there are also dangers to sharing. Understanding that there may be an appropriate state in the creative process to share an idea (or not to share an idea) is another concept I would like to explore more. Is there research on this? I suspect the author is privy to this research. Very interesting.

 

 

The critical thinking skills that I have listed comes from a pdf "Core Thinking Skills Categorized By Intended Outcome for the Learner" which was in turn sourced from "Teaching Students To Think" by Dr. John Langrehr. 

 

 

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H.O.T. / D.O.K.: Teaching Higher Order Thinking and Depth of Knowledge: Difficulty vs. Complexity: What's the Difference?

H.O.T. / D.O.K.: Teaching Higher Order Thinking and Depth of Knowledge: Difficulty vs. Complexity: What's the Difference? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Via John R. Walkup
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John R. Walkup's curator insight, March 16, 2014 11:04 PM

Another excellent blog article by Erik Francis of Maverik Education. This one discusses the difference between difficulty and complexity (rigor).