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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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Are gifted students slighted in schools?

The American public school system’s focus on struggling students leaves high-achievers without a challenging enough education—a detriment to the country in a time of concerns over international compet...
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "A 2011 Fordham Institute study found that between 30 and 50 percent of advanced students descend and no longer achieve at the most advanced levels."

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20 Funniest Sports Faces

20 Funniest Sports Faces | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
While athletes are in motion trying to win the game, photographers are making a living out of the most unflattering photos they can get.

Via F. Thunus
Sharrock's insight:

One of these pictures just has to make it into a presentation for some kind of reason.

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Reduce Bias In Analysis By Using A Second Language

Reduce Bias In Analysis By Using A Second Language | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

In a world where the majority of analysts are bi- if not multi-lingual, the question of how language affects both the analytic process and analytic product is an important one. Emotion, language processing and cognitive biases aside, the intriguing question remains: Would you make the same decision in English as you would in, say, Chinese? Most analysts would likely answer yes to this question, but recent research led by Boaz Keysar out of the University of Chicago suggests otherwise.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
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Bonnie Hohhof's curator insight, November 19, 2013 5:51 PM

another great post by Kris Wheaton

Estefanía Aguilar's curator insight, November 26, 2013 6:06 AM

Language knowledge is important for everything!!!

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Top Ten Ways to Deal with Behavioral Biases

Top Ten Ways to Deal with Behavioral Biases | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
We all suffer from cognitive and behavioral biases. How can we best deal with them? 

Pretty much since the day I wrote it, my Investors’ 10 Most Common Behavioral Biases has been the most popular post on this blog.  It still gets a surprising number of hits all these months later.  Due to the pioneering work of Daniel Kahneman and others, nearly everyone in the financial world acknowledges the reality of cognitive and behavioral biases and their impact on people, the markets and life in general. It’s a very popular subject.

Unfortunately, we don’t think that we are susceptible to them personally.

As I have noted before, we all tend to share this foible — the bias blind spot, which is our inability to recognize that we suffer from the same cognitive distortions and behavioral biases that plague other people.  As one prominent piece of research puts it:


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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How to Manage Biased People

How to Manage Biased People | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
By now it’s generally accepted that if senior leaders suffer from cognitive biases their decisions can severely undermine company performance.

Via Thomas Faltin
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The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational

The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The human brain is capable of 1016 processes per second, which makes it far more powerful than any computer currently in existence. But that doesn't mean our brains don't have major limitations.
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How To Ace 10 Of The Most Common Interview Questions

How To Ace 10 Of The Most Common Interview Questions | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Here are the 50 most common interview questions with advice on how to prepare for and answer them.
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Starfish Education: Strengthening Rigor in STEM- Defining Rigor in the Classroom

Starfish Education: Strengthening Rigor in STEM- Defining Rigor in the Classroom | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Strengthening Rigor in STEM- Defining Rigor in the Classroom http://t.co/yq0zB4gnlv #STEM #Edchat #NSTA #scienceed

Via John R. Walkup
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57 Cognitive Biases That Screw Up How We Think

57 Cognitive Biases That Screw Up How We Think | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Via Marci Segal, MS
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Marci Segal, MS's curator insight, January 4, 2014 9:25 PM
Becoming aware of biases gives you opportunity to explore beyond them
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The Extraordinary Demands of High-Needs Teaching

The Extraordinary Demands of High-Needs Teaching | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The Extraordinary Demands of High-Needs Teaching

Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA
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Lessons From Great Storytellers: LinkedIn Speaker Series with Nancy Duarte

Lessons From Great Storytellers: LinkedIn Speaker Series with Nancy Duarte | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Great ideas can change the world. But, they can only do so when effectively communicated. A powerful story is one of the best ways we can share our world-changing ideas.

Via José Carlos
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José Carlos's comment, January 11, 2014 10:38 AM
I think the vision from Nancy is more for business and markting. In education its not easy to apply, because not all contents are easy to convert into stories, but we try :D
Annette Simmons's comment, January 11, 2014 10:54 AM
Even in business and marketing there are stories that are not vision stories - it's not a criticism of Nancy…just something I think helps my clients understand that "undulation" is not always necessary when crafting a story.
Janet Tillotson's curator insight, February 3, 2014 1:14 AM

interesting...

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The 7 Transformational Concepts in The 21st Century Education ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

The 7 Transformational Concepts in The 21st Century Education ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Via sportynikstar, Sharrock
Sharrock's insight:

There are shifts in the ways we approach work and education that make their ways into our lives. We might focus on one or two of these concepts in our own lives, but miss that these concepts are involved in new ways of working and learning. Change occurs in small, incremental ways then suddenly, all at once. 

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Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 5:05 PM

There are shifts in the ways we approach work and education that make their ways into our lives. We might focus on one or two of these concepts in our own lives, but miss that these concepts are involved in new ways of working and learning. Change occurs in small, incremental ways then suddenly, all at once. 

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Regression toward the mean - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Regression toward the mean

In statistics, regression toward (or to) the mean is the phenomenon that if a variable is extreme on its first measurement, it will tend to be closer to the average on its second measurement-and, paradoxically, if it is extreme on its second measurement, it will tend to have been closer to the average on its first.

Sharrock's insight:

I learned of this term from Thinking, Fast and Slow when I heard this story:

The psychologist Daniel Kahneman, winner of the 2002 Nobel prize in economics, pointed out that regression to the mean might explain why rebukes can seem to improve performance, while praise seems to backfire.[8]

“I had the most satisfying Eureka experience of my career while attempting to teach flight instructors that praise is more effective than punishment for promoting skill-learning. When I had finished my enthusiastic speech, one of the most seasoned instructors in the audience raised his hand and made his own short speech, which began by conceding that positive reinforcement might be good for the birds, but went on to deny that it was optimal for flight cadets. He said, “On many occasions I have praised flight cadets for clean execution of some aerobatic maneuver, and in general when they try it again, they do worse. On the other hand, I have often screamed at cadets for bad execution, and in general they do better the next time. So please don’t tell us that reinforcement works and punishment does not, because the opposite is the case.” This was a joyous moment, in which I understood an important truth about the world: because we tend to reward others when they do well and punish them when they do badly, and because there is regression to the mean, it is part of the human condition that we are statistically punished for rewarding others and rewarded for punishing them. I immediately arranged a demonstration in which each participant tossed two coins at a target behind his back, without any feedback. We measured the distances from the target and could see that those who had done best the first time had mostly deteriorated on their second try, and vice versa. But I knew that this demonstration would not undo the effects of lifelong exposure to a perverse contingency.
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How to personalize learning

How to personalize learning | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Those who have made the transition from teacher-led instruction to student-driven education say it is a difficult process.
Sharrock's insight:

Technology is not enough, but technology is your friend. It can help, but ultimately, relationships or important. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 22, 2014 1:04 PM

It is not clear what is meant by help teachers adjust to change. Does this mean teachers are given autonomy to make changes they feel need to be made to help students? I don't see that happening. It would shake up the status quo and those outside the classroom would not want that.

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30 Positive Reframes: How to Start Changing Your Perspective on Life

Learn 30 positive reframes when it comes to thinking about yourself and others.
Sharrock's insight:

How do you train teachers and school staff in describing student behaviors? Exhaustion and stress can make descriptions of people negative. This list helps make better word choices.


excerpt: "Try to think of this list as a resource to help you think more positively. It won’t make you a master of positive reframes, but it is a great starting point to get you thinking in a different direction."

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It’s About Making Sense, NOT decisions

It’s About Making Sense, NOT decisions | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Cumbersome decision-making processes, cognitive biases that favor existing mindsets, and a false sense of the permanence of decisions can all work against leaders’ ability to sense and adapt to rapidly changing realities.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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donhornsby's curator insight, July 3, 2013 8:09 AM

(From the article): When I was in government I would sometimes hear the question: “Are you suggesting that I revisit the decision we made a year ago?” It was a scary question; it implied that all the work we had done to staff the issue was somehow in vain and, even worse, that the official should risk appearing indecisive or lacking in conviction. Now I believe that that type of questioning is not only necessary, but perhaps the most important responsibility of a corporate team. The future belongs to those who revisit their decisions early and often.

Gary Bamford's curator insight, July 3, 2013 2:22 PM

Boy - that's well on the money!

Kevin Sutton's curator insight, July 4, 2013 10:51 AM

Make snes instead of decisions!

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Edward Tufte forum: Making better inferences from statistical graphics Edward Tufte

Edward Tufte forum: Making better inferences from statistical graphics Edward Tufte | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Edward Tufte home page for books, posters, sculpture, fine art and one-day course: Presenting Data and Information (Making credible inferences from data #visualization
Cognitive biases in #data #analytics

Via AnalyticsInnovations
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The New Era Of Talent

The New Era Of Talent | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The truth is that today's war for talent is asymmetric. The “best and the brightest” will have to make way for the highly motivated and deeply connected.
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Gamifying Your Math Facts: ‘Reflex Math’ Software Review

Gamifying Your Math Facts: ‘Reflex Math’ Software Review | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
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Gallium – A Rare Metal with Interesting Properties

Gallium – A Rare Metal with Interesting Properties | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Hard to believe something like this exists!
Sharrock's insight:

Thinking about the power of scientific demonstrations for classes. Is video as good as analog? Is it good enough? Also, considering the possibility of wasting time with entertainment. What can a teacher do to avoid students simply being amused or entertained, making the demonstration part of an effective learning experience?

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The Legal Ramifications of a Bomb Threat

The Legal Ramifications of a Bomb Threat | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Threats at work or school cause real panic -- hoax or not. As a result, perpetrators can face real legal consequences.

 

Criminal charges or not, any student playing such a prank will end up with a permanently tarnished academic record. And youngsters aren’t exempt: kids under 18 can still be tried as an adult in most states, depending on the seriousness of the crime and the judge’s discretion. Youngsters playing pranks could face juvenile detention or other penalties. Parents should make children aware of the ramifications of such pranks or actual threats.

 



Cited from: The Legal Ramifications of a Bomb Threat http://nakedlaw.avvo.com/safety-2/the-legal-ramifications-of-a-bomb-threat.html#ixzz2qHnEQVe3

Sharrock's insight:

We should explore ways to instruct students regarding the consequences of hoaxes and pranks. Students often have few experiences interacting with local or federal law enforcement, so may not have a clear sense of the seriousness of some of their actions. Apparently, some adults do not have this clear sense as well. 


Excerpt: 

In some states, a conviction under a state or federal charge for making a school bomb threat can also:

Get a student’s drivers license or learner’s permit revoked,Make parents liable for their child’s actions in civil court, andResult in an automatic suspension from public school.



Cited from: The Legal Ramifications of a Bomb Threat http://nakedlaw.avvo.com/safety-2/the-legal-ramifications-of-a-bomb-threat.html#ixzz2qHnQpwjS

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Learning to Think: A Foundation for Analysis

Learning to Think: A Foundation for Analysis | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Teaching students how to think and analyze are important goals of today's teacher. See how one high school teacher uses a two day lesson to get students to analyze texts and develop more critical ways of thinking.

Via Tracee Orman, Mary Clark
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Mary Clark's curator insight, January 8, 2014 1:42 PM

This video would be great for professional development. It's short enough to share during an hour long PD session, leaving time to discuss and create ideas for implementing in the classroom.  

Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:55 AM

So many good videos on this website. This lesson reminded me of one I typcially taught as my students moved into analytic literary research. Like Wessling, I would work with students to generate a list of all the aspects within a piece of literature that one could analyze throughout the text. And the, I would ask them to choose two or three and explore not only how they found the aspects interacting, but what literary critics before them said about the text's development in those areas.

Nalya Ovshieva's curator insight, October 25, 2014 4:48 PM

A great way of thinking - looking for concrete and conceptual patterns, and then draw conclusions.. 

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Convert Any Video File Into MP3, WAV, Ogg, WMA and More with Media.io

Convert Any Video File Into MP3, WAV, Ogg, WMA and More with Media.io | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Sharrock's insight:
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Convert any video clip you have into an audio file (.mp3, .wav, .wma .ogg, .m4a or .aac) easily and without having to buy or download any dedicated software.

 

With Media.io you simply upload your video file (or provide the URL of where it is published) and then you select the audio format and quality settings you want and the rest is done for you automatically.

 

This is a no-frills, no-ads, no tricks and no-strings attached service. A little work of love that deserves to be supported.

 

Free to use. (donate to support this spam-free service)

 

Try it out now: http://media.io/ ;

 

File formats supported: http://media.io/help/upload/ ;

 

Check also this clean online YouTube video converter:http://saigonxaydung.com/  ;

 

Both created by http://johannburkard.de/ ;

 
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Bart van Maanen's curator insight, January 19, 2014 9:55 AM

Nog niet geprobeerd, maar wie weet nog eens handig.

Orlanda RIBEIRO's curator insight, February 17, 2014 1:32 PM

FORMATS 

TWCLibrary's curator insight, August 5, 2014 2:48 AM

free to use

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Avoiding blind spots in your next joint venture | McKinsey & Company

Avoiding blind spots in your next joint venture | McKinsey & Company | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Even joint ventures developed using familiar best practices can fail without cross-process discipline in planning and implementation. A McKinsey & Company article. many JVs struggle with insufficient planning to respond to eventual changes in risk. Such lapses, even in the early stages of planning, create blind spots that affect subsequent stages and eventually hinder implementation and ongoing operations. We’ll examine each of these issues, along with the approaches some companies are taking to deal with them.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
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▶ Is Punishment or Reward More Effective? - YouTube

 

 

The psychologist Daniel Kahneman, winner of the 2002 Nobel prize in economics, pointed out that regression to the mean might explain why rebukes can seem to improve performance, while praise seems to backfire.[8] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

 

 

I had the most satisfying Eureka experience of my career while attempting to teach flight instructors that praise is more effective than punishment for promoting skill-learning. When I had finished my enthusiastic speech, one of the most seasoned instructors in the audience raised his hand and made his own short speech, which began by conceding that positive reinforcement might be good for the birds, but went on to deny that it was optimal for flight cadets. He said, “On many occasions I have praised flight cadets for clean execution of some aerobatic maneuver, and in general when they try it again, they do worse. On the other hand, I have often screamed at cadets for bad execution, and in general they do better the next time. So please don’t tell us that reinforcement works and punishment does not, because the opposite is the case.” This was a joyous moment, in which I understood an important truth about the world: because we tend to reward others when they do well and punish them when they do badly, and because there is regression to the mean, it is part of the human condition that we are statistically punished for rewarding others and rewarded for punishing them. I immediately arranged a demonstration in which each participant tossed two coins at a target behind his back, without any feedback. We measured the distances from the target and could see that those who had done best the first time had mostly deteriorated on their second try, and vice versa. But I knew that this demonstration would not undo the effects of lifelong exposure to a perverse contingency.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean

Sharrock's insight:

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 

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Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:50 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence. 

 
Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:51 PM

Why do people resist research findings from areas like leadership, education, parenting, and other areas related to psychology and sociology? One reason may result from the confusion between the use and value of controlled experiments and the value of anecdotal evidence.