School Leadership...
Follow
Find
1.4K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Sharrock from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
onto School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Scoop.it!

How Soft Skills, Passion and Connection Can Promote Learning, Competence and Employability

How Soft Skills, Passion and Connection Can Promote Learning, Competence and Employability | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Schools traditionally place the majority of value on the academic skills students acquire in school.

Via Nancy Jones, Lynnette Van Dyke
Sharrock's insight:

more on bedside manner or compassion promoting education and learning.

more...
Nancy Jones's curator insight, October 24, 2013 12:56 PM

A very interesting perspective on what we teach and do not teach in the classroom in terms of promoting competence. It is much more than merely academics.

Nancy Jones's curator insight, October 24, 2013 12:57 PM

A very interesting perspective on what we teach and do not teach in the classroom in terms of promoting competence. It is much more than merely academics.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:27 PM

We need compassion to go with the passion.

From around the web

School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

“Teaching Kids to Code” Guide: A Fantastic Resource - GeekDad (blog)

“Teaching Kids to Code” Guide: A Fantastic Resource - GeekDad (blog) | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
“Teaching Kids to Code” Guide: A Fantastic Resource GeekDad (blog) As GeekDads we are probably more aware than others of the increasing interest from parents, schools and businesses of teaching kids to code.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How to Hold Your Team Accountable--Without Being a Jerk

How to Hold Your Team Accountable--Without Being a Jerk | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Become a better leader by confronting your employees in a polite and efficient way.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How Your State of Mind Affects Your Performance

How Your State of Mind Affects Your Performance | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

How state of mind (that is, their moment-to-moment experience of life as generated by their thinking and as expressed by their feelings) can affect their leadership, and to help them manage their respective states of mind, rather than being managed by them.

Sharrock's insight:

Look at what is being described. It's more than just overcoming one's emotions, it's self-regulation and mood management. Emotions are different from states of mind. Is mood different from emotional states of mind though? But also, look at HOW this regulations was accomplished: visualization, the use of imagination and breathing to overcome the affect and it wasn't accomplished through the reasoning and logical powers of the cognitive mind. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

NP High School begins pilot program for one-to-one computing devices | The Valley Breeze

NP High School begins pilot program for one-to-one computing devices | The Valley Breeze | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
A group of students at North Providence High School will be using laptops instead of textbooks for the remainder of the school year as administration looks to collect data on the effects of one-to-one computing.

Through a grant from Mobile Beacon, a local Educational Broadband Service provider, 25 Lenovo ThinkPad laptops were distributed to students in Cassie Souto and Dana Gambardella's reading classes on Dec. 2.
Supt. Melinda Smith said these students would be the first in the district to utilize the devices as part of a six-month pilot program at the high school.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

U.S. Supreme Court Weighs School Threats on Social Media

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday wrestled with threats made on social media, with some justices worried about when school administrators might need to respond to such content, and others wondering whether the "reasonable teenager on the Internet" should be the standard for evaluating whether threats are serious.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Five-year-old British boy becomes youngest ever qualified computer specialist - Telegraph

Five-year-old British boy becomes youngest ever qualified computer specialist - Telegraph | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Ayan Qureshi from Birmingham is Microsoft’s youngest-ever certified computer specialist
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Sorry Haters, Political Correctness Actually Boosts Creativity

A new study out of Cornell claims that if you have a diverse team, watching your language actually improves performance.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Tackling discipline disparities: MPS data illuminate possibilities for change - MinnPost

Tackling discipline disparities: MPS data illuminate possibilities for change - MinnPost | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
District leaders see this week's agreement with federal officials as an enhancement to a series of changes already under way.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

List of 28 chronically underperforming schools in Silicon Valley stirs up storm - San Jose Mercury News

List of 28 chronically underperforming schools in Silicon Valley stirs up storm - San Jose Mercury News | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
To lend urgency to the task of improving education for poor children, a Silicon Valley advocacy group has released a list of the 28 chronically worst-performing schools in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Hundreds of Colorado high school students refuse to take state tests - The Denver Post

Hundreds of Colorado high school students refuse to take state tests - The Denver Post | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
In the latest dispute over standardized testing, hundreds of high-school seniors in high-performing, wealthy districts are skipping science and social stu
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Five Personalities of Innovators: Which One Are You?

The Five Personalities of Innovators: Which One Are You? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Whenever I try to conjure up what innovation looks like, the same slideshow of images clicks across my mind: that photo of Einstein with his tongue sticking out, Edison with his light bulb, Steve Jobs onstage in his black turtleneck, introducing the latest iThing. Unoriginal and overdone, to be sure. [...]
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Too Many Kids Quit Science Because They Don't Think They're Smart

Too Many Kids Quit Science Because They Don't Think They're Smart | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Dweck: Actually, praise may not be the optimal way, but we are so praise oriented. We can ask the child questions about the process: “How did you do that? Tell me about it.” As they talk about the process and the strategies they tried, we can appreciate it. We can be interested in it. We can encourage it. It doesn’t have to be outright praise.
Sharrock's insight:

Dweck's conclusions about how praise works should help shape discussions about parenting, teaching, feedback, and also around the building of credibility THROUGH appreciation. The boundaries are dissolving between education and other knowledge work fields but also between educators and learners. Students will recognize real interest and appreciation of their thinking-work as truly valuing work. Attention is one of the main currencies of the knowledge era. The more attention being paid to what you are doing, the more encouragement you feel that what you are doing is valuable and valued. These are the face-to-face "likes" that do more than vaguely acknowledge you have accomplished something. When time is spent listening, evaluating the student's process and progress, and asking questions that leads to more progress, students will deepen their interest, become more encouraged, and may increase in other areas as well. This is true for any worker, though. No teacher wants to simply be observed and assessed based on a pass/fail system. Teachers want to feel that the person observing them "gets" what the teacher is doing, what the teacher has accomplished. In the Danielson tool, this appreciation has the opportunity of expression when discussing planning and also in the follow up or post-observation debriefing. Cognitive coaching models are appreciation and credibility-building tools.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Technology and Leadership in Education
Scoop.it!

Nice Visual on The Ins and Outs of Professional Development ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Nice Visual on The Ins and Outs of Professional Development ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Via Anna Hu
more...
Anna Hu 's curator insight, November 2, 9:28 PM

love that we need to - View Core skills as the responsibility of all educators, no matter the subject they teach.

This would be true for Digital Citizenship and Technology Skills.

Mitchell Kearsley's curator insight, November 3, 6:14 PM

Could not agree more!

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Problem solving courts key to fixing system - Cape Gazette

Problem solving courts key to fixing system - Cape Gazette | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
of the more than two million people in jail or prison right now in america, nearly 500,000 are mentally ill. source after reputable source continues to print these statistics, including the ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The 10 tell-tale signs your boss doesn’t like you

The 10 tell-tale signs your boss doesn’t like you | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
If it wasn't clear already.

 

Does your boss really like you? While it’s true that you don’t have to be bosom buddies with your boss in order to do your job, it certainly makes things a lot more difficult if there’s some personal dislike between you and your superiors.

 
Sharrock's insight:

excerpted advice: 

"So, what do you do if you discover that your boss secretly (or not so secretly) hates you? Well, the easy answer here is to start looking for another job, but if that’s not an option for some reason, try these steps:

 

 

Confront your boss in a positive manner. Don’t add fuel to the fire by being defensive, but bring up your concerns. Approach the conversation from the angle that you want to improve and evolve as an employee—and that you can only do so with feedback.Document your successes and your boss’ slights. Start a little brag book where you write down and document the things you do well, contributions you make, etc. This will be useful when you have your next performance review, or if things escalate to talk of termination. In addition, you might consider keeping a list documenting your boss’ behavior in case you need it for the same reason.Talk to HR or your boss’ boss (assuming the boss in question is not the owner or CEO of the company).If all this gets you nowhere then a final resort might be to consider taking outside advice."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

WHAT IS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE?

WHAT IS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE? This article for the layman answers basic questions about artificial intelligence. The opinions expressed here are not all consensus opinion among researchers in AI. Basic Questions Branches of AI Applications of AI More questions Bibliography About this document ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Scoop.it!

Great ways to improve your presentations and speeches

Great ways to improve your presentations and speeches | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Some people like to learn from mistakes. Others prefer to learn by finding out what to do instead of what not to do.

 

Here’s some great advice from Boris Veldhuijzen van Zanten, serial entrepreneur and founder of TwitterCounter and The Next Web, on what you should always do during your presentations:

 

1. Reinforce who you are.

 

At most conferences, you will be introduced, and that introduction should make the audience look forward to hearing your story.

But even though the audience might know something about you, it still makes sense to say a little bit extra about yourself. Don’t overload everyone with information, but in one or two sentences explain how your background matters and makes you the perfect person to share what you’re about to say.

Framing that makes it easier for people to digest what you are saying is too often overlooked.

 

2. Help everyone find you.

 

A lot of presentations end with a slide that shows the speaker’s name, URL, Twitter handle, and email address.

 

That slide is usually displayed for about three milliseconds before the projector is switched off. Before people in your audience even have time to reach for a pencil or laptop, your information is gone.

Provide your contact information on the opening screen, and keep it there for a while. (Some people display their name and email address in the footer of every slide, but you might feel that’s overkill). I generally start and close with my Twitter handle (@Boris) and invite people to contact me there.

 

Bonus tip: When you’re in the audience and sense the end of a presentation coming, get your smart phone ready and take a quick snapshot of that last slide. You can write the information down later.

 

3. Share real stories.

 

People love stories. The best presentations I’ve seen didn’t feel like presentations at all–they were stories told by people with amazing experiences. When you want to explain something to an audience, see if you can translate it into a story, an anecdote or even a joke. If you need to convey data or information, tie it to a story. If the story you tell is something that happened to you, that’s even better. If the story is funny, even better!

 

4. Entertain as much as inform.

 

An often forgotten point: Your job is to, at least in part, entertain the members of your audience. They’re taking a break from something else. They’ve closed their laptops and are focusing on you. Why not reward them with something interesting or funny? Your entire talk doesn’t need to be completely on topic. It’s fine to start off with something that is beside the point as long as it’s entertaining.

Never forget that people will listen more closely to what you have to say when they’re having a good time.

 

5. Time it perfectly.

 

When you’re speaking, in effect you’re borrowing your audience’s time. It’s investing in you — respect that investment and don’t abuse that trust. If you’re given 30 minutes, feel free to only use 25 minutes. Your primary goal is to entertain, inform, and make your audience’s investment in time worthwhile. Your goal is not to use up every available minute.

 

I used to be very concerned with how much time I had for talks; my biggest fear was that I would run out of things to talk about. Now my only concern is giving a great presentation. If that means ending a 30-minute slot after fifteen minutes, fine – you can always take more questions from your audience. The better your presentation, the more questions you will get.

 

And the more your audience will feel you respected its investment in you.

 

6. Provide something to take home.

 

I always try to think of something specific I can deliver–in words, not in swag–that the members of the audience can apply as soon as they get back to work. I learned that from a speaker at one of our events who had a hugely inspiring story, but then interrupted himself and said something like: “But you can apply this very easily tomorrow by doing the following…”

 

A sigh of relief went through the room as people scrambled for their notebooks. Inspiration is cool and productive, but it really helps if you have something tangible to offer that your audience can apply right away.

 

7. Feel free to repeat.

 

It’s natural to assume everyone in the audience is paying attention to everything you say. In reality, people hear about 30 percent of what you say, and of that they’re constantly translating it to fit their own perspectives or agendas. Plus, things you think are logical and even self-evident might not immediately make sense to everyone in your audience.

 

That’s why it never hurts to repeat yourself a few times. If you want to explain a certain principle, first explain it. Then give two examples of your principle at work. Then, at the end of your talk, go over the different principles you covered and briefly highlight each one.

By then, you’ve explained your principle four times, and that might just be enough.

 

8. Help the audience remember at least one thing.

 

It’s very easy to overload the audience with information. You think, Wow, I have thirty minutes. I need to really fill those thirty minutes. But most people can’t really absorb a lot of information, plus chances are you might be one of a number of speakers that day.

Think of it this way: If ten percent of the people in the audience really listen to your story and remember one or two key points they can incorporate into their lives, you’ve done really well. Focus on providing something people can remember and that will have an impact on their lives. To do that, of course, means your story must be simple and clear.

 

And that’s a good thing.

 


Via Vilma Bonilla, Ivon Prefontaine
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 10, 1:25 PM

Presenting is giving an account of one's self. It is more than sterile information and it is not appropriated from others. Both of those catch up to us in time.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

What Today's Leaders Can Learn From Napoleon's Mistakes

Napoleon was unquestionably a great strategist and imposing historical figure. His leadership style had many flaws, which eventually led to his downfall.

In the vein of learning from others mistakes, here are five lessons today's leaders can pull from Napoleon:
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

A Botched Study Raises Bigger Questions

A Botched Study Raises Bigger Questions | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Why one education research technique, coming into use by most states, is proving so controversial.
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 14, 12:43 PM

Research is important, but it only gives a snapshot in time and about conditions at a given time. We need to learn from all research failed or successful whatever that means.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Special education is ineffective and too expensive, report says

Special education is ineffective and too expensive, report says | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
In 2013, 76 percent of Washington's students graduated from high school within four years, but only about 54 percent of students with disabilities got their diplomas on time.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Prepare for harder days ahead as Syracuse schools revamp student discipline ... - The Post-Standard - syracuse.com

Prepare for harder days ahead as Syracuse schools revamp student discipline ... - The Post-Standard - syracuse.com | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The independent monitor sees the crisis as an opportunity for "transformational work.'' Who will step up to lead it? And will the wider community lend its support?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

No more snow days? Lessons over Internet keep schools in session - Today.com

No more snow days? Lessons over Internet keep schools in session - Today.com | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Are school snow days, as we know them, about to be bulldozed? While the idea may leave some students cold, it’s gaining momentum thanks...
Sharrock's insight:

interesting idea but may raise issues about tech access and broadband equality. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

NYC chancellor considers consolidation of small, struggling schools

NYC chancellor considers consolidation of small, struggling schools | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The move would reverse a Bloomberg-era policy that divided large, failing schools into smaller new schools.  
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Intro to Model Programs | YouthLearn

Often the greatest challenge for a novice afterschool educator is how to launch a new effort, especially if technology is involved.

 

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "The programs below have been selected to spotlight the breadth of approaches one can take in harnessing technology afterschool. These are not intended to be all inclusive, but rather illustrative of the range of programs that are successfully integrating technology. To compile these profiles, we conducted interviews with program staff and included their own descriptions of their work along with our summaries based on these conversations. Click here to view how we organized these profiles."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

This is what happens to test scores when you pay teachers $125,000 a year

This is what happens to test scores when you pay teachers $125,000 a year | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Not including bonuses.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Difference Between Technology Use And Technology Integration

The Difference Between Technology Use And Technology Integration | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
TEST The Difference Between Technology Use And Technology Integration
by TeachThought Staff
Using technology for learning makes sense. Technology creates access, transparency, and opportunity.
more...
No comment yet.