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Parents Press for Attention to Programs for Gifted Students

Parents Press for Attention to Programs for Gifted Students | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
From court cases to lobbying to fundraising, parents are pressuring states and districts to boost services for the gifted, whose needs they say often are overlooked—a particular concern for low-income and minority parents.
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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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“Teaching Kids to Code” Guide: A Fantastic Resource - GeekDad (blog)

“Teaching Kids to Code” Guide: A Fantastic Resource - GeekDad (blog) | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
“Teaching Kids to Code” Guide: A Fantastic Resource GeekDad (blog) As GeekDads we are probably more aware than others of the increasing interest from parents, schools and businesses of teaching kids to code.
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Nancy Duarte on Failure, Bootstrapping, and the Power of Better Presentations

Nancy Duarte on Failure, Bootstrapping, and the Power of Better Presentations | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Nancy Duarte on how she went from a college dropout to heading up her own communication firm.
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Influencing Staff Creativity: How Good Leaders Get it Right | Leading from the ... - Library Journal

Influencing Staff Creativity: How Good Leaders Get it Right | Leading from the ... - Library Journal | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Productive change depends on staff members who are working creatively to develop new ideas for better library services. Leaders can play an important role in helping staff to achieve higher levels of workplace creativity.
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How Your Mission Drives Your Strategy | Digital Tonto

How Your Mission Drives Your Strategy | Digital Tonto | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Great businesses, in the final analysis, are built by passion. Strategies can come and go, but the mission of the enterprise is fundamental to directing action
Sharrock's insight:

important section: "More recently, there has been a seismic shift in the strategic environment.  Whereas we used to compete in distinct industries with clear boundaries, today business is dominated by open ecosystems.  Although Apple is an integrated firm, its App store allowed thousand of developers to enhance its product, without having to coordinate with Jobs or his firm.

This has had a profound effect on how we have to think about strategy.  Every media company now must consider Amazon a threat, although Amazon itself is a retailer that competes with Walmart.  It also recently launched a Fire phone and is in a pitched battle with Microsoft to win dominance in cloud services.

The result is that strategy is no longer just about efficiencies and capabilities along the value chain, but also widening and deepening networks of connections.  In today’s semantic economy, the structure of your relationships is every bit as important—if not more important—than the structure of your organization."

 

 

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What Does Critical Thinking Mean in Education ?

What Does Critical Thinking Mean in Education ? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Critical thinking is an important skill in the  21st century learning. Education's overall goal is to produce students that will be able to think critically and not just take in things like a parrot. Of course there is a bunch of other important skills out there but this particular one stands out from the crowd. The thing about ttis skill is that while almost all  teachers agree upon its priority in education only few really know what it really means


Via Maree Whiteley
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Charlie Meredith's comment, July 24, 2013 4:43 PM
Really good you tube clip in here on critical thinking
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Creating communication friendly schools

Creating communication friendly schools | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
“Creating communication friendly schoolsClassrooms which have clearly defined areas create a more organised environment which pupils can navigate easily, says Fiona Barry 66 51 1 1 119 EmailClassroom displays can bring learning to life but can be visually distracting Photo: Alamy Top 10: Advice on Choosing the Best Postgrad University Place for YouPostgraduate study is a fantastic opportunity, but your success and enjoyment will in part depend on where you study. AdvertisementBy Fiona Barry2:00PM GMT 20 Mar 2015CommentEducation is an area that is constantly meddled with by politicians and in the lead up to this year’s General Election there will, no doubt, be many changes proposed in the hope of securing votes.Whether our schools survive the next year unscathed remains to be seen. However, regardless of any potential changes, one thing that remains constant is the research evidence that demonstrates the central role that communication skills play in education attainment and outcomes later on in life.Good communication skills underpin all learning and this is reflected in the fact that Ofsted has a strong focus in their inspection framework on how children are developing their communication skills within a school and whether teachers are able to support them with this.The Teachers’ Standards, set by the Department for Education, states that all teachers should take responsibility for promoting high standards of speaking and listening skills regardless of the subject they teach.In practice, not all teachers feel confident in doing this. However, creating schools which have a communication friendly environment is a cohesive and effective way of sharing out the responsibility of driving up communication standards in schools. There are three main areas which need to be considered:Visual support to enhance understanding of the written and spoken word Everyone benefits from backing up writing and speech with signs, pictures and symbols. This promotes independence and helps students understand rules, routines and information. Imagine an alien landing in your school. Would they easily be able to find their way round and know how the day works?Colour coded maps, room labels with photos of the teacher or what happens in the room and staff boards in the foyer with named photos help students and visitors navigate the building.Classrooms with consistent colour coding for areas and pictures to show where equipment is kept reduces anxiety and helps understanding, as do visual timetables showing the structure of the day or part of a lesson, like getting dressed for PE.The use of symbol supported learning materials in lessons makes the curriculum accessible to all. When worksheets, stories, task instructions and new vocabulary are accompanied by symbols and pictures, this helps understanding of words and instructions and allows pupils to work through tasks with increasing independence.Symbol supported learning materials in lessons makes the curriculum accessible to allEnsuring that adults communicate in ways that support language developmentThe way that parents and teachers interact with pupils has the strongest effect on how their communication skills emerge. Information on typical language development and the strategies that encourage this should be shared with staff and parents.Some 'Golden Rules' can be created, which teachers and parents agree to try and adopt, for example, allowing extra thinking time for pupils to respond to questions is a simple rule that can have wide reaching consequences for all pupils.Creating surroundings which facilitate good communicationThe physical environment has a huge impact on how well pupils can listen and talk, but schools do not always take this into consideration. It's helpful to think about the auditory surroundings in school. What are the acoustics of the classroom like? Can the teacher's voice be heard, if not, what would improve this?The visual environment is also key. Are there lots of visual distractions in areas where children are expected to concentrate?Classroom displays can bring learning to life but can be visually distracting which is problematic for all children, especially those with listening and attention difficulties. Considering placing displays away from areas where children are expected to work and having clear wall spaces there instead is useful.Is there adequate lighting? Having the light source in front of the teacher is preferable as spoken information is heavily supported by non-verbal information like lip movements, facial expression and eye contact.Classrooms which have clearly defined areas create a more organised environment which pupils can navigate easily. Making specific areas which are conducive to talking is beneficial for pupils of all ages.As with any whole school plan it's vital that a top-down approach is taken to ensure that the key features are embedded into everyday practice.It's helpful for school leadership teams to give staff and governors information around the links between communication skills and raising educational attainment in order to encourage an understanding of why changes need to be made.Including actions about communication development in the school action plan ensures that adaptations to the school environment are followed through. Teacher training is also crucial and local speech and language therapy services are the best starting point to investigate training that is on offer.A helpful resource is the Communication Trust's 'Communication Commitment' which provides a comprehensive guide to creating a whole school approach to boosting talking and listening skills.Incorporating speaking and listening activities into lesson planning for all subject areas creates time for talk during the day and raises the status of 'just talking' to be in line with the status given to reading and writing. Celebrating positive communication skills through speaking and listening awards or communication mentor schemes also raises the profile.Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, none of this would be successful without involving parents. Parental engagement is crucial to every aspect of a child's school career. Sharing information via newsletters, bulletin boards and parent talks about what the school is aiming for and how parents can support this at home is essential.Our schools are likely to be subjected to yet another barrage of policy changes in the near future. However, teachers and parents can safeguard the success of pupils by making consistent and effective adaptations to the school environment now, to enable all students to be able to communicate to the best of their abilities in the future.”
Via Charles Tiayon
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3 Speaking Habits That Are Damaging Your Credibility

3 Speaking Habits That Are Damaging Your Credibility | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Here's how to eliminate common speech patterns from your presentations.
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Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class - Brilliant or Insane

Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class - Brilliant or Insane | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
How deep is your commitment to reflective practice?

Do you maintain a reflective journal? Do you blog? Do you capture and archive your reflections in a different space?

Do you consistently reserve a bit of time for your own reflective work? Do you help the learners you serve do the same?

I began creating dedicated time and space for reflection toward the end of my classroom teaching career, and the practice has followed me through my work at the WNY Young Writer’s Studio. I’ve found that it can take very little time and yet, the return on our investment has always been significant.

Via John Evans, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Darrington Lee's curator insight, March 7, 9:36 PM

I feel that it is generally important to reflect on one self after taking a lesson, this ensures we are learning on the right track and doesn't "fall off" the topic. Reflection keep us calm and collected, so we can stand back straight up even after a failure to accomplish something. This gives us a never ending space to improve and beyond than just learning, but also to persevere, take responsibility in one's learning and also to excel in things we do.

Sue Alexander's curator insight, March 9, 1:54 PM

Reflection...don't leave class without it!

Ann-Lois Edström's curator insight, March 10, 12:52 PM

Att reflektera över sin undervisning och hjälpa eleverna att också göra det. Jättebra frågor!

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Primary pupils becoming video stars in online book reviews - Independent.ie

Primary pupils becoming video stars in online book reviews - Independent.ie | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
It is an innovative way to encourage children to read. Irish primary schoolchildren are becoming book-show presenters and are posting reviews of their favourite novels online.

Via John Evans
Sharrock's insight:

This is a cool idea. 

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Janika Puolitaival's curator insight, March 5, 9:02 AM

Children presenting favourite books for other children always always works better than librarians sharing book tips. This is something that should be done even more. Something to develop with local schools?

Kobe Davis's curator insight, April 5, 8:33 PM

This article explains the introduction of a FIS book club in British schools. This website encourages students to read through creation of online book reviews. Students are filmed talking about books they have read and critiquing their characters and plot lines.

 

This way of learning focuses on student learning where “students are active rather than passive recipients of knowledge” (Commander, Ward & Zabrucky, 2012, p. 395) and encourages them to “think more deeply about learning” (Commander, Ward & Zabrucky, 2012, p. 398).

 

I would use this technology in stages 1-3 with books that I have selected as well as books that the student has chosen. Students would be instructed to film their book reviews in pairs and then present these videos to the class. The class would then critically analyse the student’s presentation and perhaps take a vote whether or not they would like to read that book. This would allow students to demonstrate their proficiency in Talking and Listening. It would also allow me as a teacher to be aware of the types of books the students would be interested in.

 

References


Commander, N. E., Ward, T, E., Zabrucky, K, M. (2012). Theory and practice: How filming “learning in the real world” helps students make the connection. Retrieved April 5, 2015 from http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1000691.pdf

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6 Leadership Styles, And When You Should Use Them

6 Leadership Styles, And When You Should Use Them | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Great leaders choose their leadership style like a golfer chooses his or her club, with a calculated analysis of the matter at hand, the end goal and the best tool for the job.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Sharrock's insight:

I question the value of applying this as "shape-changing" leadership. Credibility is built on predictability (among other habits and practices). It might work for taking a position, assessing the need as leader, and becoming that leader, but to change shape in the same organization will strain relationships and damage communication, especially when a general message to the org or department is towards empowerment and autonomy then expecting others to accept micromanagement. 

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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, March 7, 2:02 AM

OK, after theories the leadership styles to choose from...

junewall's curator insight, March 8, 10:25 PM

What do you think? .... Try this.... but remember People come first!

 

What styles do you use more often than the others?

Jean Marc Santi's curator insight, March 9, 3:34 AM

Just because it's so adaptative

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How to write a speech for any occasion

How to write a speech for any occasion | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
There's nothing worse than staring at a blank screen, and wondering how you'll begin to write a speech.
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The art of systems thinking in driving sustainable transformation

The art of systems thinking in driving sustainable transformation | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

“Changing systems takes expertise and a deft touch.”


Via Jürgen Kanz
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"Leverage Points: Places to Intervene in a System" by Donella Meadows


Via Jürgen Kanz
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Jürgen Kanz's curator insight, January 26, 2014 1:56 PM

Very useful to understand the

PLACES TO INTERVENE IN A SYSTEM

(in increasing order of effectiveness)

9. Constants, parameters, numbers (subsidies, taxes, standards).
8. Regulating negative feedback loops.
7. Driving positive feedback loops.
6. Material flows and nodes of material intersection.
5. Information flows.
4. The rules of the system (incentives, punishments, constraints).
3. The distribution of power over the rules of the system.
2. The goals of the system.
1. The mindset or paradigm out of which the system — its goals, power structure, rules, its culture — arises.

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The Collapse of Expertise and Rise of Collaborative Sensemaking

The Collapse of Expertise and Rise of Collaborative Sensemaking | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
If organizations are going to thrive in turbulent times, they must surrender many of their most cherished assumptions and start leveraging the power of collaborative knowledge. But this won’t be easy as most continue to believe in the same top-down knowledge management strategies common to the machine age.

In the social era, the power of collaboration is key and collaborative knowledge generation–or sensemaking–is essential for staying competitive amidst the messy, complex challenges that define our hyper-connected universe.

But there’s a glitch: paying workers to collaboratively solve problems and cultivate ideas flies right in the face of traditional management thinking and its belief that the only valid source of knowledge is authoritative expertise. So, clearly, a new understanding about knowledge and the role of expertise is needed.
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The Best Kept Secret to Phenomenal Productivity

The Best Kept Secret to Phenomenal Productivity | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Kim Cameron and his colleagues at the University of Michigan, however, have discovered a way to improve performance that has nothing to do with dishing out benefits or deploying new processes. In a research article published in the Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, Cameron and his coauthors found that a workplace characterized by positive and virtuous practices excels in a number of domains.
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Are You An Analog or Digital Leader?

Are You An Analog or Digital Leader? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
By Abhijit Bhaduri and Bill Fischer Changing mindsets begins with you! The only mind you can be sure of changing is your own, and the only way that you can demonstrate this mindset change is through your behaviors.

Via Alexander Crépin
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CIM Academy's curator insight, March 27, 6:44 AM

Times are changing and being a digital leader is now a key aspect of  achieving marketing success.

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Why Big Organizations Are Broken | Digital Tonto

Why Big Organizations Are Broken | Digital Tonto | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Everybody would like to think more about the long term, but unless you can solve everyday problems, you’ll never get there. However, control is an illusion and always has been.  When large organizations had a monopoly on resources, it was a workable fiction.  It no longer is.
Sharrock's insight:

This brings together some interesting ideas. The quote itself says that the old style of leadership is outdated because resources were monopolized objects that people couldn't access or manipulate without permission. Information and access is not controlled easily. The information age of the knowledge era requires high levels of transparency, collaboration, and communication so that problems can be discovered and solved. This requires a different kind of leadership that rejects formal authority, instead valuing informal authority. There are other ideas to consider connected with this article and regarding leadership in general. For one, there is the question about authority as an expert, how power is derived from authority (or vice versa), and the fluidity of leadership as it directs power towards greater effectiveness.

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How to Develop 5 Critical Thinking Types - Forbes

How to Develop 5 Critical Thinking Types - Forbes | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Great leaders think strategically. They can understand and appreciate the current state as well as see possibilities.


Via Maree Whiteley
Sharrock's insight:

This type of strategic leadership requires five different types of thinking. Knowing when and how much to utilize each one is the hallmark of great leaders.

Critical thinking is the mental process of objectively analyzing a situation by gathering information from all possible sources, and then evaluating both the tangible and intangible aspects, as well as the implications of any course of action.Implementation thinking is the ability to organize ideas and plans in a way that they will be effectively carried out.Conceptual thinking consists of the ability to find connections or patterns between abstract ideas and then piece them together to form a complete picture.Innovative thinking involves generating new ideas or new ways of approaching things to create possibilities and opportunities.Intuitive thinking is the ability to take what you may sense or perceive to be true and, without knowledge or evidence, appropriately factor it in to the final decision.
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The creative spark

The creative spark | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
What makes us create and innovate? Here, wildly creative thinkers share ideas and insights into what kindles genius.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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Better Standardized Testing (Myths and Falsehoods) | Cognitive Rigor to the Core!

Better Standardized Testing (Myths and Falsehoods) | Cognitive Rigor to the Core! | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Argument: Testing doesn't assess everything a child needs to learn!

This argument is a form of the Nirvana fallacy, where an idea is rejected because it doesn't provide a perfect solution to a problem or fails to meet every single criterion for effectiveness. No matter how well a test is designed, it will never capture all of the factors needed for students to succeed. 
Sharrock's insight:

Walkup raises important points that points back to the need for others to evaluate our thinking and actions. We are human, so we can't be perfect. The most obvious of our imperfections is captured by the endless list of fallacies and biases. In the end, only (mostly) the most mentally ill will see herself as the bad guy in her life story. No matter what we do, we have rationales or rationalizations. Even when we're wrong, we can only mostly see our errors in retrospect. (To experience this, try editing your own writing then hand it over to someone else to edit.Then compare the editing suggestions.) 

 

On the other hand, we also need to trust and respect our evaluators. This is something that standardized testing--based on how they are constructed--can provide based on objectivity and sample sizes. And we all believe in testing. "When a calculus teacher assesses her students on Taylor series expansions, she knows fully well that her assessment will fail to capture many of the personal traits needed to be a successful mathematician. Yet, she still assigns the test."

 "Standardized testing is no different. Results of standardized testing are limited to uncovering gaps in basic concepts/skills acquisition. We should acknowledge as such."  

This is better than depending on the opinionated colleague down the hall who finds success certain ways that fits his personality, but doesn't fit well for anyone else. 

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Sharrock's curator insight, March 8, 7:18 PM

Walkup raises important points that points back to the need for others to evaluate our thinking and actions. We are human, so we can't be perfect. The most obvious of our imperfections is captured by the endless list of fallacies and biases. In the end, only (mostly) the most mentally ill will see herself as the bad guy in her life story. No matter what we do, we have rationales or rationalizations. Even when we're wrong, we can only mostly see our errors in retrospect. (To experience this, try editing your own writing then hand it over to someone else to edit.Then compare the editing suggestions.) 

 

On the other hand, we also need to trust and respect our evaluators. This is something that standardized testing--based on how they are constructed--can provide based on objectivity and sample sizes. And we all believe in testing. "When a calculus teacher assesses her students on Taylor series expansions, she knows fully well that her assessment will fail to capture many of the personal traits needed to be a successful mathematician. Yet, she still assigns the test."

 "Standardized testing is no different. Results of standardized testing are limited to uncovering gaps in basic concepts/skills acquisition. We should acknowledge as such."  

This is better than depending on the opinionated colleague down the hall who finds success certain ways that fits his personality, but doesn't fit well for anyone else. 

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How to Handle Different Types of Social Engagement

How to Handle Different Types of Social Engagement | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Due to the rise of social media and being connected 24/7; businesses are more connected to their customers more than ever.
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Prevention vs. Punitive: Addressing DISD's Discipline Gap - CBS Local

Prevention vs. Punitive: Addressing DISD's Discipline Gap - CBS Local | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Follow CBSDFW.COM: Facebook | Twitter DALLAS (CBS 11 NEWS) - A recent study found that African American students in Dallas Independent School District secondary schools are more than twice as likely to be suspended for discipline issues… News, Sports,...
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Want to Double Your IQ? Listen!

Want to Double Your IQ? Listen! | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
There are so many reasons why we all tend to talk too much:

A false sense of urgency
Insecurity
Infatuation with our own idea
Ego
The desire to dominate others
All of these are traps that not only harm our ability to work with others, but also cause us to act dumber than we really are.
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Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Via callooh
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Willem Kuypers's curator insight, February 25, 5:45 PM

Well done mindmap about learning theories.

Richard Whiteside's curator insight, February 27, 4:53 AM

Really useful mindmap with links to further info about the theories and theorists. Shame it isn't in an easily downloadable format.

Cris Mepham's curator insight, February 27, 6:52 AM

If you need a few ideas!

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Systems Thinking with Peter Senge of The Fifth Discipline; ExIn041111 - YouTube

A rare and yet an indepth interview with author Peter Senge of The Fifth Discipline while he was in Manila in April 2011. Dr. Peter Senge talks to host Raju ...

Via Jürgen Kanz
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A guide to complexity and organizations

A guide to complexity and organizations | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

“change to more people orientated business will be challenge to introduce to colleagues - its a change we need http://t.co/5Amtb5VluT #SHCR”


Via Jürgen Kanz
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