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Using Todoist for Task Management - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Using Todoist for Task Management - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
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Heather Whitney writes: "There are a lot of options available for online task management. Here at ProfHacker, we have reviewed several, including Remember the Milk, Things, and GQueues. All have their pros and cons, and are worth taking a look at.
Todoist is another option."

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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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“Teaching Kids to Code” Guide: A Fantastic Resource - GeekDad (blog)

“Teaching Kids to Code” Guide: A Fantastic Resource - GeekDad (blog) | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
“Teaching Kids to Code” Guide: A Fantastic Resource GeekDad (blog) As GeekDads we are probably more aware than others of the increasing interest from parents, schools and businesses of teaching kids to code.
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Affinity Diagram - ASQ

The affinity diagram organizes a large number of ideas into their natural relationships.
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Every Manager Needs Communicate To Effectively -- Here's How To Do It Better

Every Manager Needs Communicate To Effectively  --  Here's How To Do It Better | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
You communicate effectively not by having a knack for a clever turn of phrase, but by putting in the effort to express your ideas clearly.
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Sharing a joke: The effects of a similar sense of humor on affiliation and altruism

Sharing a joke: The effects of a similar sense of humor on affiliation and altruism | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Cooperation requires that individuals are able to identify, and preferentially associate with, others who have compatible preferences and the shared background knowledge needed to solve interpersonal coordination problems. This body of shared knowledge constitute a substantial proportion of what is called ‘culture’. It has been argued that, for this reason, individuals prefer to associate with others who share their culture, and also that shared appreciation of humor provides a particularly effective means of identifying others with the relevant preferences and knowledge. The present experiment uses a ‘dummy rating procedure’ to compare the effects of sharing an appreciation of non-humorous (first lines of novels) and humorous (jokes) cultural stimuli on interpersonal affiliation, altruism and assessment. The results show that the degree of shared appreciation for both sets of stimuli had a positive effect on Affiliation; only humorous stimuli had an effect on Altruism; and neither effected the Assessment of others' personal traits. Thus, the results support the general theory that shared culture promotes affiliation, and provide evidence of the special role of humor in interpersonal relations.

 


Via Ashish Umre
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Strategic Humor: Cartoons from the June 2015 Issue

Strategic Humor: Cartoons from the June 2015 Issue | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Enjoy these cartoons from the June issue of HBR, and test your management wit in the HBR Caption Contest.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
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How to add Humor in Your Presentation

How to add Humor in Your Presentation | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Making presentation may be an easy task for many of the presenters but engaging to the audience to your words would undoubtedly be difficult. Thus, to make your work easily perceived by your audience you need to add humor to your presentation.

Via medicalppt
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medicalppt's curator insight, December 23, 2013 4:35 AM

Find tips about how to add humor in presentation within a short time to engage the audience and make understandable PPT. Overview to create your mesmerize presentation.

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PANArt Hang documentary 2006: HANG - a discreet revolution - YouTube

A Documentary by Thibaut Castan and Véronice Pagnon - English Version - © Copyright by Thibaut Castan and Véronice Pagnon Version française: http://youtu.be/...
Sharrock's insight:

(excerpt from Wikipedia)

"The Hang (German pronunciation: [haŋ],[1] plural form: Hanghang[2]) is a musical instrument in the idiophone class created by Felix Rohner and Sabina Schärer in Bern, Switzerland. The name of their company is PANArt Hangbau AG.[3] The Hang is sometimes referred to as a hang drum, but the inventors consider this a misnomer and strongly discourage its use.[4]

The instrument is constructed from two half-shells of deep drawn, nitrided steel sheet[5][6] glued together at the rim leaving the inside hollow and creating a distinct 'UFO shape'. The top ("Ding") side has a center 'note' hammered into it and seven or eight 'tone fields' hammered around the center. The bottom ("Gu") is a plain surface that has a rolled hole in the center with a tuned note that can be created when the rim is struck.

The Hang uses some of the same basic physical principles as a steelpan, but modified in such a way as to act as a Helmholtz resonator.[7][8] The creation of the Hang was the result of many years of research on the steelpan and other instruments.[9] The inventors of the Hang have continued to refine the shape and materials and have produced several variations over the years.

The name Hang comes from the Bernese German word for hand. It is a registered trademark and property of PANArt Hangbau AG.[10]" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hang_(instrument) 

 

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Coping with Stress and Types of Burnout: Explanatory Power of Different Coping Strategies

Coping with Stress and Types of Burnout: Explanatory Power of Different Coping Strategies | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Policies and interventions to promote mental health should be designed to effectively involve the work environment and process as a key arena for action [1]. The majority of people in developed and developing countries now live in cities and are formally or informally linked to workplaces where most of their productive lives are spent [2]. Studies have shown the importance of work stressors both in the generation and prevention of mental disorders [3], but there is still a lack of policies and interventions that effectively improve workers’ mental health and prevent disorders. Interestingly, even among mental health workers, work-related mental disorders are highly prevalent [4]. Thus, work environments and processes are key elements in public health.

Burnout syndrome is an important work-related disorder of psychosocial origin, caused when stressful working conditions are endured. Its presence has been associated with a worsened self-perception of health and a large amount of somatic comorbidity [5]. Burnout has traditionally been described as a relatively uniform entity in all individuals, with more or less consistent aetiology and symptoms [6]. According to the classical definition, this syndrome includes the dimensions of exhaustion, cynicism and professional inefficacy [7], [8]. ‘Exhaustion’ is the feeling of not being able to offer any more of oneself at an emotional level; ‘cynicism’ represents a distant attitude towards work, those served by it, and colleagues; and ‘inefficacy’ is the feeling of not performing tasks adequately or being incompetent at work. These dimensions are strongly associated with each other, providing a unitary although three-dimensional definition of burnout [9].

Nevertheless, different burnout types have been proposed, according to the degree of dedication at work [10]. The ‘frenetic’ burnout type works increasingly harder, to the point of exhaustion, in search of success, and presents involvement, ambition and overload. The ‘under-challenged’ type has to cope with monotonous and unstimulating conditions that fail to provide satisfaction and feels indifference, boredom and lack of personal development. The ‘worn-out’ type gives up when faced with stress or the absence of gratification and shows lack of control, lack of acknowledgement and neglect [11], [12]. The dimensions of overload, lack of development and neglect, belonging to the frenetic, under-challenged and worn-out subtypes, respectively, comprise a definition of burnout that comes close to the standard perspective [9], [13]. ‘Overload’ refers to individuals’ feeling of risking health and personal life in the pursuit of good results and is significantly associated with exhaustion; ‘lack of development’ refers to the absence of personal growth experiences for individuals together with their desire to take on other jobs where they can better develop their skills and is markedly associated with cynicism; ‘neglect’ refers to individuals’ disregard as a response to any difficulty and is strongly associated with inefficacy [13], [14]. While approaching the standard definition, the dimensions referred to in the typological model show little relation to each other, which allows a differential characterisation of the syndrome to be made by means of clinical profiles [13].

In general, ‘burnout’ is a subject’s response to chronic work-related stress and is an attempt to adapt to or protect oneself from it [15]. Stress has been defined as the result of a relationship with the environment that the person appraises as significant for his or her well-being, and in which demands tax or exceed available coping resources. Coping is defined as cognitive and behavioural efforts to manage specific internal and/or external demands that are appraised as taxing or exceeding the person’s resources [10], [16]. A person will be psychologically vulnerable to a particular situation if he or she does not possess sufficient coping resources to handle it adequately and places considerable importance on the threat implicit in the consequences of this inadequate handling. There are different general trends in coping with stress, such as cognitive or behavioural coping, cognitive or behavioural avoidance, emotion-focused coping or substance use [17]–[19]. From this perspective, burnout may be observed as a progressively developed condition resulting from the use of the ineffective coping strategies with which professionals try to protect themselves from work-related stress situations [20].

There is an accumulation of evidence linking coping styles with stress and burnout. At first, coping style was studied as a relatively stable characteristic of the person, regardless of the nature of the task or situation, showing that certain inflexible coping styles could be associated with higher levels of stress [21], [22]. Subsequently, the emphasis was placed on the relationship between the coping style and the situation [16]. Early research seemed to support the idea that problem-focused coping was a better strategy than emotion-focused coping for stress management. However, it was later found that there were sub-factors that did not allow the application of such a general conclusion [23]. Problem-focused coping is not an appropriate strategy to address stress if the situation is uncontrollable or chronic [24], as it could lead, in this case, to a progressive process of behavioural disengagement [25]. Emotional coping has been noted to be detrimental if it involves distancing, avoidance or denial regarding the situation but is an effective strategy if it involves a positive reappraisal [26], [27]. In the long term, the key factor for developing the burnout syndrome seems to be the degree of passivity that the subject acquires [19], [28], [29].

So far, possible relationships between burnout types and coping strategies have not been explored. A better knowledge of the coping strategies associated with each burnout profile could promote the development of specific treatments and preventive programmes for the syndrome that might potentially be more effective [26]. In this context, the aim of this work was to estimate the explanatory power of the different styles of coping with stress on the development of different burnout subtypes, evaluating the contribution of specific coping strategies. In general terms, the hypotheses were established according to the degree of dedication at work shown by the different burnout subtypes. The frenetic burnout subtype is a highly dedicated profile, which means that the related overload could be associated with active coping strategies, such as those included in problem-focused coping. The under-challenged burnout subtype is a profile characterised by an intermediate dedication to work, meaning that the related lack of development could be associated with avoidance coping strategies. The worn-out burnout subtype is a profile characterised by a low level of dedication, meaning that the associated neglect could be due to a behavioural impairment related to the use of disengagement strategies. In essence, this grading of the levels of dedication could be pointing to different stages in the longitudinal development of the syndrome. Different coping strategies for stress could be contributing to each of these [10], [12].
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Burnout phases and consequences

Burnout phases and consequences | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Burnout is a process that develops in stages over several weeks or months – even years. One of the best-known multi-stage models was developed by a psychologist Herbert Freudenberger, who was also the first to describe the term „burnout“ in 1974 as „a state of mental and physical exhaustion caused by one’s professional life”, “a desease of over-commitment”. At each of burnout phases, different physiological and psychological symptoms and consequences are described.
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Inside Obama's Stealth Startup

Inside Obama's Stealth Startup | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
President Obama has quietly recruited top tech talent from the likes of Google and Facebook. Their mission: to reboot how government works.
Sharrock's insight:
History in the making!
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Some Non-Obvious Advice on Thought Leadership - Rand's Blog

Some Non-Obvious Advice on Thought Leadership - Rand's Blog | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
I don’t particularly like the phrase “thought leader” or “thought leadership” for two reasons: 1) just *thinking* about something doesn’t make you a leader, nor does being a leader enable you to simply think about things AND 2) the term has pretentious and sometimes negative associations. When I hear people describe me that way, I have a viscerally …
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The Influence of Language on Theory of Mind: A Training Study

The Influence of Language on Theory of Mind: A Training Study | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
This study investigated the role of language in the development of theory of mind. It was hypothesized that the acquisition of the syntactic and semantic properties of sentential complements would facilitate the development of a representational theory of mind. Sixty preschoolers who failed false belief and sentential complement pretests were randomly assigned to training on false belief, sentential complements, or relative clauses (as a control group). All the children were post-tested on a set of different theory of mind tasks, sentential complements and relative clauses. The main findings were that the group trained on sentential complements not only acquired the linguistic knowledge fostered by the training, but also significantly increased their scores on a range of theory of mind tasks. In contrast, false belief training only led to improved theory of mind scores but had no influence on language. The control group, trained on relative clauses, showed no improvement on theory of mind posttests. These findings are taken as evidence that the acquisition of sentential complements contributes to the development of theory of mind in preschoolers.
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Coffee Alternatives That Are Better For Productivity

Coffee Alternatives That Are Better For Productivity | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Swap your caffeine habit for one of these healthier alternatives and get a bigger mental boost.
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When did being ‘nice’ become a business liability?

When did being ‘nice’ become a business liability? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
It's time to change the rule in business and let authenticity rule. How has “niceness” come to represent weakness or ineffectiveness? How can this attribute be viewed as bad for business? And what in the world does it mean to be “too” nice? Not only did I believe this candidate was successful in her job because of her polite, gentle nature, but I am convinced that had she tried to come across as more direct, more assertive or more bullying, she would have failed miserably.
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The Top Complaints from Employees About Their Leaders

The Top Complaints from Employees About Their Leaders | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
A survey shows a striking lack of emotional intelligence among executives.
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TED | TED Quotes: Facts, insight and humor from TEDTalks — in shareable bites

TED | TED Quotes: Facts, insight and humor from TEDTalks — in shareable bites | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

TED Quotes brings you salient bits of TEDTalks, on everything from activism to storytelling, from chemistry to curiosity. A great place to look for inspiration...and then watch the video to learn more.


Via Beth Dichter
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3 Big Reasons Humor Benefits Your Leadership

3 Big Reasons Humor Benefits Your Leadership | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Laughter and play are essential components for resilience. When it comes to leadership in complex times, a sense of humor ranks up there with strategic thinking and superb communication skill.

Via Don Dea
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Don Dea's curator insight, February 13, 12:43 AM

91% of executives believe a sense of humor is important for career advancement. While 84% feel that people with a good sense of humor do a better job

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How Humor Can Backfire on Social Media

How Humor Can Backfire on Social Media | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

“Shama Hyder, founder of Marketing Zen Group, says to be careful with jokes on social media. Not everyone may share your sense of humor.”


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Using Humor to Boost Your Training Programs

Using Humor to Boost Your Training Programs | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
What’s that—nobody laughs at your training? You could have a problem on your hands. Here’s why: Humor is a vital component of successful education, though you might not hear “educators” say that too often.

Via Sarantis Chelmis
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The Best Employee Engagement Strategy Is From The Bottom Up

The Best Employee Engagement Strategy Is From The Bottom Up | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
VideoSo what’s the right employee engagement strategy to dramatically increase engagement in your organization? Well let’s first talk about the wrong strategy... Usually, someone from HR has to convince the CEO to spend money on an employee survey. And when the results come back, the data is hoarded by the senior leadership [...]
Sharrock's insight:

There are devleopmental differences between adults and students (children), but there might be takeaways that educators might use in classrooms and schools.

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The 3 Kinds of Burnout

The 3 Kinds of Burnout | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
We typically think of “burnout” as the result of working too many hard, stressful hours. However, new research shows that burnouts actually come in three different types, and each requires a different strategy to fix.
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High correlation between Company Performance, Business Intelligence success and level of ambition

High correlation between Company Performance, Business Intelligence success and level of ambition | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
High correlation between Company Performance, Business Intelligence success and level of ambitions. What level of ambition does your organization pursue?
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Using Metaphor Maps To Move Groups Forward -- Storytelling Process

Using Metaphor Maps To Move Groups Forward -- Storytelling Process | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Using Art to Create A Safe Place for Dangerous Truths When you walk into a room and see people leaning back with crossed arms, responding to words like “teamwork” with rolling eyes and cynical smiles, or worse, staring into space with blank faces...

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, May 6, 4:27 PM

When working with groups, sometimes getting people to open up to really get to the stories driving them can be tough. Because what you are going for is not the "Tell me about the time your team's most successful project..." or "Tell me about the time your team made a big mistake..."


Nope -- those won't do. What you are going for is the underbelly, the stories that are building walls, divisions, mistrust, turf wars, and the like. Sometimes to move groups forward, you've got to dig into the guts and bring some light to the situation.


But you also don't want to get stuck in unleashing a horde of "Ain't it awful" stories full of blame and victimization.


So what do you do? As biz story colleague Annette Simmons so eloquently shows us, you need to break down barriers and have people reframe what's going on. They way to do that is using art and metaphor maps.


Simmons shares with us a handy process that gets this work done. Metaphors are building blocks of stories. If you need to change the stories of a group, start with metaphors maps.


Thanks Annette! There's timeless wisdom here combined with good story work technique.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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An Introduction to Self-Efficacy

An Introduction to Self-Efficacy | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Self-efficacy influences: 

(1) what activities students select,

(2) how much effort they put forth,

(3) how persistent they are in the face of difficulties, and

(4) the difficulty of the goals they set.

 

Students with low self-efficacy do not expect to do well, and they often do not achieve at a level that is commensurate with their abilities. They do not believe they have the skills to do well so they don't try.

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Neuroscience: The Power of Curiosity to Inspire Learning

Neuroscience: The Power of Curiosity to Inspire Learning | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
When our curiosity is piqued, learning can be a snap and recalling the new information comes effortlessly. But when it comes to things we don’t care about—the recipe to that "delicious" holiday fru...
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Ranganath’s team discovered that as the students grew curious, activity increased in two brain regions (the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area and the nucleus accumbens) that are associated with reward and motivation. The level of curiosity seemed to control activity in these areas like a dimmer switch. During times of great curiosity, these two brain regions were very active. During moments of disinterest or even boredom, these areas shifted into low gear."

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How Numbers Can Lie

How Numbers Can Lie | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
While the idea of “scientifically engineered” solutions sounds attractive, we should remember that science isn’t about certitude, but skepticism. There is never a magic formula that can solve all our problems.
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