School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
Curated by Sharrock
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The Transparency Trap

The Transparency Trap | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

The author "found that individuals and groups routinely wasted significant resources in an effort to conceal beneficial activities, because they believed that bosses, peers, and external observers who might see them would have “no idea” how to “properly understand” them. Even when everyone involved had only the best of intentions, being observed distorted behavior instead of improving it."

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "They used four types of boundaries to establish certain zones of privacy within open environments: They created boundaries around individual teams—zones of attention—to avoid exposing every little action to the scrutiny of a crowd. They drew boundaries between feedback and evaluation—delineating zones of judgment—to avoid politicking and efforts wasted on managing impressions. They set boundaries between decision rights and improvement rights—establishing zones of slack—to avoid driving out tinkering. And they put boundaries around carefully defined periods of experimentation—zones of time—to avoid both too frequent and too infrequent interruptions. Across several studies involving different industries, cultures, and types of work, the companies that had done all this were the ones that consistently got the most innovative, productive, and thoughtful work from their employees."

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Leadership Turns On the Lights

Leadership Turns On the Lights | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
I have worked with people who seemed to think their authority came from keeping the rest of us in the dark. They told us only what they thought we needed to know. They withheld information that would have helped us do a better job.

Via Ryan Hines
Sharrock's insight:

Transparency is more complex than people tend to believe. It applies to how information/data is chosen, why it is relevant to the problem solving and decision making. Transparency also applies to the processes of problem solving, related concerns, laws/regulations/policies restricting certain actions, and can include domain specific conventions and strategies that may not be easily grasped in a sentence or two. Charts and graphs are only a small piece to the facilitation of transparency.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, January 29, 2014 1:53 PM

It is a great metaphor. It is not just leaving people in the dark it is about surprising them as well. With the lights on we have a chance to see where the next step might land.

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The 7 Transformational Concepts in The 21st Century Education ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

The 7 Transformational Concepts in The 21st Century Education ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Via sportynikstar, Sharrock
Sharrock's insight:

There are shifts in the ways we approach work and education that make their ways into our lives. We might focus on one or two of these concepts in our own lives, but miss that these concepts are involved in new ways of working and learning. Change occurs in small, incremental ways then suddenly, all at once. 

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Sharrock's curator insight, January 11, 2014 5:05 PM

There are shifts in the ways we approach work and education that make their ways into our lives. We might focus on one or two of these concepts in our own lives, but miss that these concepts are involved in new ways of working and learning. Change occurs in small, incremental ways then suddenly, all at once. 

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Are you open to being more open? | Transformati...

Are you open to being more open? | Transformati... | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Posted by Andrew Liakopoulos on July 12, 2013 Today Deloitte launched a new report that zeros in and expands on one of the 2013 Human Capital Trends we’ve been tracking: the open talent economy. We...


Via Brian Dawson
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What it Really Means to Be in Love

What it Really Means to Be in Love | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
How to get past your own defenses and learn to build a real relationship.
Sharrock's insight:

Love can be taught since it is a set of skills: "With love being so closely connected to meaning and fulfillment, it's valuable for each of us to define love as an action or series of actions we can take to bring us closer to the people we value.

"In a romantic context, some essential characteristics that fit the description of a loving relationship include:

Expressions of affection, both physical and emotional.

A wish to offer pleasure and satisfaction to another.

Tenderness, compassion, and sensitivity to the needs of the other.

A desire for shared activities and pursuits.

An appropriate level of sharing of possessions.

An ongoing, honest exchange of personal feelings.

The process of offering concern, comfort, and outward assistance for the loved one's aspirations."

 

Which of these skills do employees expect leadership to demonstrate? Which are  promoted as a "glue" between co-workers?

Dropping the "physical" from these descriptions and skills, what insights and connections do we find? What is the meaning of transparency in this context?

 

Here's another question: are employees asking for too much, expecting too much, from their work relationships and work environments? Are we looking for love in all the wrong places?

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The Death Of Expertise

The Death Of Expertise | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
To reject the notion of expertise, and to replace it with a sanctimonious insistence that every person has a right to his or her own opinion, is silly.

Via Ryan Hines
Sharrock's insight:

There isn't so much a "death of expertise" as there is a greater drive for individuals to question the gatekeepers. Malcolm Gladwell explores this in with how people interact with their doctors and has found class differences. The knowledge era has been described by Michael Maccoby as having different kinds of social character: the interactive social character. And in this era, employees usually have more expertise than their supervisors do. The Dunning-Kruger effect is a cognitive bias that can also come into play, but there are also new messages coming from the very experts that are mentioned as "dying"--influencers share stories about the limitations of organizational capacity and cultures. There are trade-offs for hiring an expert from outside of the organization, they explain to varying degrees. Then there is the drive for transformative leadership (or servant leadership paradigms) towards transparency, communication, and collaboration.


In Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman has also shared that experts fail at long terms predictions. They might get it right in the "short term", but people looking for sooth seers are expecting too much. 

 

Next, despite one's expertise, a great deal of research supports that algorithms and checklists are more reliable (refer to the work of Paul Meehl). That's partly because experts are human beings who, due to various biases and fallibility, take short cuts, fail to follow well established procedures, and will sometimes reject data to fall prey to halo effects and other cognitive biases. Experts are more effective with the help of checklists and algorithms, but are less effective, less acccurate, without them. 

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Ryan Hines's curator insight, January 22, 2014 2:50 PM

Tom Nichols explores how the extinction of gatekeepers (or at least their disappearance from public discourse) and the democratization of knowledge that comes with it has unleased some rather ugly beasts. Does this endanger thought leaders? The author puts forward a few 'rules of the road' for those of us who engage with experts.

 

Bonus: the Dunning-Kruger effect, a particular blend of overconfidence and incompetence. 

Sharrock's comment, January 22, 2014 3:06 PM
There isn't so much a "death of expertise" as there is a greater drive for individuals to question the gatekeepers. Malcolm Gladwell explores this in with how people interact with their doctors and has found class differences. The knowledge era has been described by Michael Maccoby as having different kinds of social character: the interactive social character. And in this era, employees usually have more expertise than their supervisors do. The Dunning-Kruger effect is a cognitive bias that can also come into play, but there are also new messages coming from the very experts that are mentioned as "dying"--influencers share stories about the limitations of organizational capacity and cultures. There are trade-offs for hiring an expert from outside of the organization, they explain to varying degrees. Then there is the drive for transformative leadership (or servant leadership paradigms) towards transparency, communication, and collaboration.
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LiquidFeedback: What A Genuine Democratic Process Looks Like | David Bollier

LiquidFeedback: What A Genuine Democratic Process Looks Like | David Bollier | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

This comment makes an excellent point, similar to those comments about our 19th Century Education Model:

"No wonder there is such alienation from conventional politics!  We’re relying upon political structures invented in the 1700s when mail was delivered by horses, and public opinion had few vehicles to manifest itself, let alone do so rapidly and with granularity.  Now, we have myriad forms of instantaneous private and public communication, many accessible repositories of serious expertise, and many supple systems for forging and mobilizing public opinion – yet our government system remains resolutely stuck in a 18th Century frame of reference.  Constitutionalists may try to ignore this egregious mismatch, citing the sanctity of history and patriotic tradition, but the Internet generation, and the Pirate Party in particular, may have the last word.  LiquidFeedback may be the "first word" in this longer debate."


I wonder if LiquidFeedback could help school administrators overhaul our townhall meetings...

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How to Stop Hospitals From Killing Us

How to Stop Hospitals From Killing Us | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Medical errors kill enough people to fill four jumbo jets a week. Surgeon Marty Makary on five simple ways the health-care system can be made safer.
Sharrock's insight:

This quote is powerful: "Transparency can also help to restore the public's trust. Many Americans feel that medicine has become an increasingly secretive, even arrogant, industry. With more transparency—and the accountability that it brings—we can address the cost crisis, deliver safer care and improve how we are seen by the communities we serve." The cases presented in the article says a lot about doctors and other medical professionals. There are implications that extend beyond the medical professions and into other knowledge work fields. 

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