School Leadership...
Follow
Find tag "research"
1.7K views | +0 today
School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The 3 Kinds of Burnout

The 3 Kinds of Burnout | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
We typically think of “burnout” as the result of working too many hard, stressful hours. However, new research shows that burnouts actually come in three different types, and each requires a different strategy to fix.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Study: Mindfulness Training Produces Less-Stressed Marines

Study: Mindfulness Training Produces Less-Stressed Marines | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Marines who took a course in the basics of mindfulness recovered from stress faster following an intense training session that replicated battlefields.
Sharrock's insight:

information: "Mindfulness, which is adapted from teachings of Zen Buddhism, is the ability to be fully aware of one’s moment-to-momentthoughts and feelings, while observing them from a place of detachment. Numerous studies in recent years suggest this ability produces mental and physical benefits for many people, including veterans and others suffering from PTSD."

 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Educational Administration & Leadership
Scoop.it!

Solving The Hidden Challenges Women In Leadership Face - Fast Company

Solving The Hidden Challenges Women In Leadership Face - Fast Company | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Fast Company
Solving The Hidden Challenges Women In Leadership Face
Fast Company
In their 2005 study “The Glass Cliff: Evidence that Women are Over-Represented in Precarious Leadership Positions,” British researchers Michelle K.

Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Adolescents’ development of skills for agency in youth programs : The Chronicle of Evidence-Based Mentoring

Adolescents’ development of skills for agency in youth programs : The Chronicle of Evidence-Based Mentoring | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

Results:

What youth learned: The analyses of youth interviews revealed 3 major themes for types of youth agency skills:

1) Mobilizing effort:learning to devote the energy and time to their work

- common theme reveals that successful work requires effort and they had gained abilities to deliberately mobilize and regulate that effort

2) Concrete organizing skills: learning rules to organize the tasks or elements of their projects

3) Strategic thinking:  “use of advanced executive skills to anticipate possible scenarios in the steps to achieving goals and to formulate flexible courses of action that take these possibilities into account”

- strategic thinking directs youth toward achievement of meaningful and challenging real-world goals and away from risk behavior (Romer, 2003).

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Medical Mysteries by Sandra G. Boodman - The Washington Post

Medical Mysteries by Sandra G. Boodman - The Washington Post | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The Washington Post's Sandra G. Boodman is looking for challenging medical cases--ones that have been resolved but in which the patient's symptoms were puzzling to doctors or suggested an immediate diagnosis that would have been wrong.
Sharrock's insight:

These are medical, but School Leaders can learn from these stories when puzzling over student mysteries in child study meetings (Response to Intervention student studies groups) or CSE meetings. Key ideas are commitment (!), experience, expertise, dignostics, and training. But trust and perseverence also come to mind. Some skills are purely medical or clinical, but there when do we know for sure when we can't support a student within the school setting? Something to think about.

 

In some ways, better than TV because they are real. Some of the tv show episodes were apparently based on one or two of these articles. Some bring to mind what Daniel Kahneman states about expert intuition in Thinking, Fast and Slow: "Intuition is nothing more and nothing less than recognition." Daniel Sivers also noted from the book "Valid intuitions develop when experts have learned to recognize familiar elements in a new situation and to act in a manner that is appropriate to it." 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Are gifted students slighted in schools?

The American public school system’s focus on struggling students leaves high-achievers without a challenging enough education—a detriment to the country in a time of concerns over international compet...
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "A 2011 Fordham Institute study found that between 30 and 50 percent of advanced students descend and no longer achieve at the most advanced levels."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

» In New Study, Video Games Not Tied to Violence in High-Risk Youth - Psych Central News

» In New Study, Video Games Not Tied to Violence in High-Risk Youth   - Psych Central News | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
In a debate that has been raging for nearly two decades, the latest research suggests the impact of violent video games has been overstated. In the new
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

School Improvement Model Shows Promise in First i3 Evaluation

School Improvement Model Shows Promise in First i3 Evaluation | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The federal Investing in Innovation, or i3, initiative bet heavily on the Success for All program, and an early evaluation suggests the investment is paying off.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Does power make you mean?

Does power make you mean? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Research suggests that a default brain mechanism may cause us to lose empathy when we gain power. So promotions really do make us mean.

 

In one of the first studies to make this claim, scientists now say a default brain mechanism may cause us to lose empathy when we gain power...

 

Obhi and his team found feelings of increased powerfulness shut down our mirroring system -- and potentially our empathy -- through a default mechanism in our brains.

 

Liza Aziz-Zadeh, assistant professor at the University of Southern California, studies empathy from a neuroscience perspective and says the findings are interesting. "People who activate their mirroring system more, also score higher on empathy."

 

By Susanne Gargiulo, CNN


Via Edwin Rutsch, David Hain, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, October 30, 2013 9:29 AM

Very interesting.  I especially like the following section:

 

"What we have found is that when people get power and move up, but don't understand how to relate, don't communicate well, and appear insensitive, cold, and authoritarian -- that ultimately derails their careers," he says.

 

This comes at an enormous cost in time, money, and morale to companies, he adds.

 

 

"In practical terms, this type of research may eventually be used and put together with training programs like mindfulness training and educational workshops for executives to deal with power better," says Obhi, but adds that we are only just beginning to understand the effects of power.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 30, 2013 12:08 PM

This is an interesting study. What about those who begin with little or no empathy?

Monique Nillessen's curator insight, November 11, 2013 8:01 AM

Hopefully this study is wrong! So when you go up in the rankings, please practice empathy, to keep the standards up.

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How people argue with research they don’t like

How people argue with research they don’t like | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
If you ever need to rebut a study whose conclusion you don't like, just follow this simple flowchart.
Sharrock's insight:

Great responses. Great flowchart. 

more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:35 PM

Research results always have to be taken with a grain of salt.

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

CDC Report: E-Cigarette Use By Kids Doubled In The Last Year

CDC Report: E-Cigarette Use By Kids Doubled In The Last Year | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
A new report by the CDC indicates that between 2011 and 2012, e-cigarette use more than doubled in U.S. middle and high school children.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

'The Afternoon I Decided to Leave Academe'--and What Happened Next - The Ph.D. Placement Project - The Chronicle of Higher Education

'The Afternoon I Decided to Leave Academe'--and What Happened Next - The Ph.D. Placement Project - The Chronicle of Higher Education | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "Finally, when I started having success as a research consultant, I turned a corner. No, my consulting career is not the same as being an academic, but I have incorporated into my new profession things I enjoyed about academe: research and writing, leading workshops, and giving presentations. I still feel sad when I look at my history books, or when friends are creating their syllabi for the coming semester. But, over all, I enjoy my new life. People treat me with respect, they value my contributions, and my research is having an immediate impact."

 

L. Maren Wood earned a Ph.D. in history from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the founder and lead researcher of Lilli Research Group, a small education-consulting firm in the Washington, D.C., metro area. She will be blogging regularly for the Ph.D. Placement Project about nonacademic career issues for Ph.D.’s.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Sharrock's insight:

This resource offers incredible levels of depth and exploration of a wide range of concepts. Recently, I have used it to appreciate the complexities of morality and the Turing Test. It occurred to me that there are other concepts that I wish to explore. It could be used as a "jump off point" for major research projects or intellectual blog publishings or any number of uses.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Policy Priorities:Full-Service Community Schools:Full-Service Community Schools

Policy Priorities:Full-Service Community Schools:Full-Service Community Schools | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

In a high-stakes education environment, can schools afford the time investment required to build community relationships? "Schools cannot afford not to build such relationships. Leaders of today's community schools movement understand that education reform is not an 'either/or proposition,'" says Marty Blank, director of the Coalition of Community Schools (Blank, 2004, p. 62).

Research has shown a strong correlation between areas with high levels of poverty, crime, and mobility and low student achievement. Despite these challenges, studies also show that supportive neighborhoods can mitigate the harmful effects of economic disadvantage on students and form the foundation for high achievement (Holloway, 2004). Education reforms will have a limited effect if they focus solely on the classroom. Policymakers need to consider what research has shown to be true—what happens in the community can and will affect the teaching and learning that happens in schools.

In Making the Difference: Research and Practice in Community Schools, the Coalition for Community Schools (Blank, Melaville, & Shah, 2003) summarized the major findings from community school initiatives. It reports,

Significant and widespread gains in academic achievement and nonacademic development.Increased family stability and greater family involvement with schools.Increased teacher satisfaction and more positive school environments.Better use of school buildings and increased security and pride in neighborhoods.

 

In addition, in evaluations spanning from 1992, the Children's Aid Society (n.d.) finds that community schools

Improve student achievement;Increase parental involvement;Demonstrate higher student and teacher attendance;Improve school climate;Increase community engagement;Decrease special education referrals; andImprove mental and physical health for students.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Why You Hate Work

Why You Hate Work | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Excessive demands are leading to burnout everywhere.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "A 2012 global work force study of 32,000 employees by the consulting company Towers Watson found that the traditional definition of engagement — the willingness of employees to voluntarily expend extra effort — is no longer sufficient to fuel the highest levels of performance. Willing, it turns out, does not guarantee able. Companies in the Towers Watson study with high engagement scores measured in the traditional way had an operating margin of 14 percent. By contrast, companies with the highest number of “sustainably engaged” employees had an operating margin of 27 percent, nearly three times those with the lowest traditional engagement scores."

more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 11, 2014 11:59 AM

Not only do we hate work, we hate the commute to and from our work. I told colleagues I would teach for 1/2 the price. That was the wrong thing to say to other teachers. Apparently, even limited altruism is not welcome. When we work for money, it is inevitable that we will become unhappy. When we work for the love of what we do, we find ways to overcome the obstacles.

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The education question we should be asking

The education question we should be asking | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

One area of education that doesn’t get enough attention in the loud education reform debate is exactly what is worth learning. In the following post Alfie Kohn explores this problem. Kohn (www.alfiekohn.org) is the author of 13 books about education, parenting, and human behavior, including “The Myth of the Spoiled Child: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom about Children and Parenting,” just published this spring. He lectures widely across the United States and abroad.

 

more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 5, 2014 11:42 AM

What is worth learning? This has been a question asked in educational research for some time i.e. John Dewey and is still being asked i.e. Bill Pinar and David Jardine. What is worth whiling over is not a bureaucratic and technocratic question, but one which comes to life in classrooms.

RJ Lavallee's curator insight, February 13, 7:41 AM

Alfie Kohn. Brilliant

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Learning Analyst | TC Media Center

The Learning Analyst | TC Media Center | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Baker and TC faculty colleagues focus on the exploding field of educational data mining (EDM), which uses advanced computer technologies to sift through huge amounts of data generated by intelligent tutoring systems and other online learning environments for information on how learners behave.  As Baker detailed in his MOOC, data mining – already a staple of the medical, financial services and retail worlds – can reveal why an individual student is getting the wrong answers to a subtraction problem; guide a teacher on how to make the best use of classroom time by pinpointing which homework problem stumped the most students the night before; and tell a superintendent which science curriculum is proving most effective with students across the district.    

 

These are issues that Baker, Associate Professor of Cognitive Studies, has won international recognition for probing.  At 36, he has published more than 150 peer-reviewed papers on the use of EDM that range from assessing boredom and cheating among students who use online tutoring systems to the mining of educational data to better understand metacognition, motivation and self-regulated learning. His ultimate focus is on creating computer-based environments in which users learn because they are genuinely engaged in their work. 

 
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: 

While he has only just begun to look at the data on his own MOOC, Baker is ready to share some anecdotal evidence about the efficacy of MOOC instruction.  Among his observations:

MOOCs are an excellent vehicle for introductory material. Many introductory courses are given by teaching assistants relatively new to teaching. By contrast, MOOC lecturers have to be subject matter experts who carefully hone their lectures and continuously work to improve them.MOOCs fill an educational void when subjects are locally unavailable. Programs in educational data mining, for example, existed in about five cities worldwide before Baker made his course available to anybody with a computer and Internet connection.MOOCs can be a vessel to interest students in more formal education programs, such as TC’s Masters in Cognitive Studies in Education (Focus in Learning Analytics) in the Department of Human Development.

The big question, of course, concerns how MOOC instruction compares with in-classroom learning. Baker takes a measured approach. He thinks MOOCs in their current state will not dominate education partly because of enrollment fall-off rates, but also because MOOCs have been made into an educational hybrid. The lectures, Baker says, are “mostly pretty good,” while homework assignments are not yet as effective.  Baker cautions against making the MOOC all things to all people.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Technology Resources for K-12 Education
Scoop.it!

A Wonderful Free Classroom Poster on Digital Citizenship ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

A Wonderful Free Classroom Poster on Digital Citizenship ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Via Anna Hu
Sharrock's insight:

simple picture with many implications for health, security, safety, and education

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The My Hero Project - Frederick Banting

It is interesting to note that Banting realized how his initial failure at a medical practice in Ontario led him on the road to a Nobel Prize. Like most heroes and discoverers, Banting showed the quality of perseverance, intuition, and courage in the face of what appeared to be insurmountable obstacles. Banting wrote in 1940: "...had I not failed in my one year at London, I might never have started my research work..." Nobel prize winner, accomplished painter, knighted by the queen, and a recipient of the Military Cross for bravery during World War I, Frederick Banting was a saver of lives. 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Technology: More than a tool, a new skill | The Thinking Stick

Technology: More than a tool, a new skill | The Thinking Stick | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

I have heard this said way too often-to the point, I believe, that some educators are using it to hide behind when it comes to using technology in their classrooms. 

Is Technology a tool? Yes.

Is it JUST a tool? No.

Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "The skills I’m talking about are skills of organization, of building research systems, and meta-cognition. Skills that go beyond the tools and deep into the learning process."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Meet The Americans Who Don't Use The Internet

Meet The Americans Who Don't Use The Internet | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Why?

A full 85% of Americans use the Internet.

That sounds pretty impressive, but when you think about the converse — the fact that 15% of American adults don't  use the Internet — who exactly are the ~38 million Americans who look at the Internet and think "Nope, not for me"?

Well, the Pew Center for the Internet tried to find that out in a report released yesterday titled "Who's Not Online And Why."



Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/meet-the-people-who-dont-use-the-internet-2013-9#ixzz2j7ZsuX6D

Sharrock's insight:

We can tell stories based on data we encounter. Students need to learn and practice at telling stories from the charts, graphs, and diagrams they are asked to read. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Emotional Intelligence and a Loyal, Motivated Staff

Emotional Intelligence and a Loyal, Motivated Staff | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Ruth Malloy is global managing director of the Hay Group Leadership and Talent practice, where she works with Fortune 500 companies to help them achieve their strategies. I've asked her to guest blog
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: 

"Boss B (Worst Boss)

Has his own agenda, keeps information to himselfVolatile, unpredictableCritical – any feedback is negativeGoals or vision tend to be around numbers versus a meaningful purposeDoesn’t listen well, is not really interested in my perspective or inputTakes all the credit, doesn’t acknowledge team contributions
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Internet Privacy and Social Networking Study

Internet Privacy and Social Networking Study | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Results of the Study

Not surprisingly, the AdLab found that communicating through social networking websites was second-nature to the study participants. However, while student were aware that the sites are inherently public, they were unaware of how public the information on these sites is and how that information can be used against them.

 

Through case studies and questionnaires, the researchers examined the students' use patterns and assessed their awareness of privacy and ethics online. The results reflect that while students regularly use the Internet in general, and social networking sites in particular, to find information about others online, many study participants had a "blind spot" in not fully realizing that the same type of a search could be performed about them.

 

The students in the study recognized that a person must take responsibility for his or her online profile, but insisted that it was wrong to judge that person by what he or she chose to post online.

 

In general, the study participants were only vaguely aware that people other than peers and classmates might be looking at their profiles. Instead, the students somewhat naïvely expected a degree of personal and professional separation online even if potential hiring managers, internship coordinators, or athletic coaches were viewing the materials online. In reality, the delineation between a person's "virtual" and "real" life appears to exist only for the college-aged participants. They appeared uncomfortable with the notion that few others make a similar distinction.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

10 Simple, Science-Backed Ways To Be Happier Today

10 Simple, Science-Backed Ways To Be Happier Today | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Did you know that the perfect temperature for happiness is 13.9C Adjust your thermostat then check out these quick tips for maximizing mirth.
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 13, 2013 7:51 PM

Two very important themes are mediation and healthy relationships. Work is an unhappy place for many and those who have positive relationships outside work are happier.