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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
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Beware those toxic co-workers

Beware those toxic co-workers | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
At some point in our careers, most of us have come across someone known as a “toxic worker,” a colleague or boss whose abrasive style or devious actions can make the workday utterly miserable. Such people hurt morale, stoke conflict in the office, and harm a company’s reputation.

But toxic workers aren’t just annoying or unpleasant to be around; they cost firms significantly more money than most of them even realize. According to a new Harvard Business School (HBS) paper, toxic workers are so damaging to the bottom line that avoiding them or rooting them out delivers twice the value to a company that hiring a superstar performer does.
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Why the PISA Debates Are Misleading -- and Useful

Why the PISA Debates Are Misleading -- and Useful | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
If the PISA test results give us the impetus we need to truly prioritize academic education -- in our families, communities, governments, and schools -- then all the hype will be more than worthwhile.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Methinks the bloggers doth protest too much. China is not the issue. Chinese statistics are not the issue. The statistical issues Dillon and Fallows discuss may explain why Shanghai significantly topped scores from ALL non-Chinese nations tested. They don't explain why the United States ranked 25th in math, 17th in science, and 14th in reading out of 34 countries surveyed. Or why students across Europe excel in two languages (three in Finland, which also tops the science ratings) while ours score in English below countries for which English is not a native language."

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APS Physics | FIP | What can we learn from physics teachers in high scoring countries on the TIMSS and PISA international assessments?

APS Physics | FIP | What can we learn from physics teachers in high scoring countries on the TIMSS and PISA international assessments? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Cherrill Spencer 

High-school teachers are amongst the most important contributors to the development of the science and technology workforce of the future. Many of the more than 23,000 US high-school physics teachers are not adequately prepared to teach the subject. Only one-third of them, for example, majored in physics or physics education. Can inadequate teacher preparation be a factor in the poor performance of US students on international assessments of their achievements in science and physics? Since 1995 the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) has been administered four times to many hundreds of thousands of students in over 60 countries. TIMSS is used to measure trends in the mathematics and science knowledge and skills of fourth- and eighth-graders. The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) has been administered three times since 2000, it focuses on 15-year-olds' capabilities in reading literacy, mathematics literacy, and science literacy. TIMSS Advanced (1995) assessed school-leaving students who have had special preparation in advanced mathematics and physics. In all these studies the US students, including the Advanced Placement physics students, scored below the international average, sometimes in the bottom third of countries!

Three knowledgeable speakers were invited to talk about the physics K-12 education systems in other countries: one that consistently scores at the top of the PISA (Dr. Pekka Hirvonen, Finland) or score much higher than the US on TIMSS (Dr. Jozefina Turlo, Poland, covering various Central European countries) and significantly better on recent bi-lateral comparisons (Dr. Lei Bao, covering China in comparison to the US). This session was designed to find out what we can learn from the physics teaching systems in these high-scoring countries that might be pertinent to our efforts to improve the teaching of physics and science to 8th through 12th graders in the US.

There are several differences in the design and purpose of the TIMSS and PISA assessments; for example the TIMSS focuses on the application of familiar skills and knowledge often emphasized in classrooms, whereas the PISA tests emphasize students' abilities to apply skills and information learned in school to solve problems or make decisions they may face at work. PISA test questions tend to deemphasize factual recall and demand more complex reasoning and problem-solving skills than those on TIMSS, requiring students to apply logic, synthesize information, and communicate solutions clearly

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: 

What can we learn from physics teachers in high scoring countries on the TIMSS and PISA international assessments? : Final words of advice from the three speakers:

Dr Pekka Hirvonen: "Education should be taken seriously; it's an investment for the future"
Dr Lei Bao: "It is not what we teach but how we teach that matters."
Dr Jozefina Turlo: "Follow the recommendations of the 2008 Nuffield Foundation report, Science Education in Europe: Critical Reflections."

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Why Creative Geniuses Hated School | Psychology Today

Why Creative Geniuses Hated School | Psychology Today | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

 George Bernard Shaw on School: “... there is, on the whole, nothing on earth intended for innocent people so horrible as a school.To begin with, it is a prison. But it is in some respects more cruel than a prison. In a prison, for instance, you are not forced to read books written by the warders (who of course would not be warders and governors if they could write readable books), and beaten or otherwise tormented if you cannot remember their utterly unmemorable contents." Read more. 

 

Thanks @GiftedHomeschoolersForum

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How Teaching Is Changing: 15 Examples | Tech in...

How Teaching Is Changing: 15 Examples | Tech in... | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
How Teaching Is Changing: 15 Examples (How Teaching Is Changing: 15 Examples via @AnaCristinaPrts http://t.co/JTHhVd2zub)
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Innovation

Today, technology is a significant driver behind change, and sometimes plays an important role in innovations in educational design and delivery. There are immense possibilities for greater and wider-spread change with the use of present-day technological advancements, as well as with the implementation of innovative educational programs. The challenge is to ensure that innovation plays a constructive role in improving educational opportunities for billions of people who remain under-served in a rapidly developing world.


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12 reasons why people resist change - change management

12 reasons why people resist change - change management | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Change Management - 12 reasons why people resist change - Torben Rick

Via Grant Montgomery
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AntonioMuggianu's curator insight, March 3, 2014 1:34 PM

12 motivi per cui i dipendenti tendono a opporre resistenza ai cambiamenti aziendali

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Four Conditions Essential for Instructional Coaching to Work | Edutopia

Blogger and former teacher Elena Aguilar describes four conditions she considers essential in order for instructional coaching to work at a school.

Via KathyPerret
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