School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
Curated by Sharrock
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Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class - Brilliant or Insane

Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class - Brilliant or Insane | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
How deep is your commitment to reflective practice?

Do you maintain a reflective journal? Do you blog? Do you capture and archive your reflections in a different space?

Do you consistently reserve a bit of time for your own reflective work? Do you help the learners you serve do the same?

I began creating dedicated time and space for reflection toward the end of my classroom teaching career, and the practice has followed me through my work at the WNY Young Writer’s Studio. I’ve found that it can take very little time and yet, the return on our investment has always been significant.

Via John Evans, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Darrington Lee's curator insight, March 7, 2015 9:36 PM

I feel that it is generally important to reflect on one self after taking a lesson, this ensures we are learning on the right track and doesn't "fall off" the topic. Reflection keep us calm and collected, so we can stand back straight up even after a failure to accomplish something. This gives us a never ending space to improve and beyond than just learning, but also to persevere, take responsibility in one's learning and also to excel in things we do.

Sue Alexander's curator insight, March 9, 2015 1:54 PM

Reflection...don't leave class without it!

Ann-Lois Edström's curator insight, March 10, 2015 12:52 PM

Att reflektera över sin undervisning och hjälpa eleverna att också göra det. Jättebra frågor!

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Are You Data Driven? Take a Hard Look in the Mirror.

Are You Data Driven? Take a Hard Look in the Mirror. | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The term "data driven" is penetrating the lexicon ever more deeply these days.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 6, 2014 12:44 PM

Most of these are not traits of education.

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How to Think for Yourself and Question Authority

How to Think for Yourself and Question Authority | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The mantra "think for yourself and question authority" speaks to a simple truth, which is: society isn't always right, and you have to trust your own heart and mind at the end of the day, no matter what anyone else thinks.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: 

 

Always be willing to step back and reflect on what you are told from others. Is what they say true? Do they use evidence and logic to back-up what they say, or are they just trying to win you over with emotions? Are there other possible ways of looking at the situation?

 

Consume information from as many different sources as possible. The more different kinds of thinking you expose yourself to, the easier it is to find what you think makes the most sense. If you are only exposed to one viewpoint, then it’s unlikely you’ll be able to think outside of that limited perspective.

 

Challenge your current beliefs. There’s a good chance that many of the beliefs you already have are influenced by society and your upbringing. Make sure you question your own thoughts and assumptions, you may have learned them at an early age when you weren’t fully capable of thinking for yourself yet.

 

Stay “cognitively flexible.” No matter where you are in life, you’re never going to have all the answers. Make sure that you are always open to new information and willing to admit it when you’re wrong. Thinking for yourself means putting in the work to keep your brain sharp and updated, not just choosing your own beliefs, stubbornly clinging to them, and then never questioning them again.

 

Write your thoughts in a journal/blog/diary. I personally find that spending a little time each day (or week) writing down your thoughts, feelings, and experiences to be a great way of introspecting on your own mind, becoming more familiar with your thought processes, finding potential flaws in your thinking, and making changes in your thinking so that it better serves you and your goals.

These are guidelines on how you should approach thinking, but it’s really up to you to take responsibility over your own thoughts at the end of the day.

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How Busy People Find Time to Think Deeply

How Busy People Find Time to Think Deeply | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
During the first presidential campaign Michelle Obama was worried her husband's schedule allowed him "no time to think." You hear the same from business executives who traverse impossibly
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Robert Fisher Teaching Thinking homepage

This article explores what metacognition is, why it is important and how it develops in children. It argues that teachers need to help children develop metacognitive awareness, and identifies the factors which enhance metacognitive development. Metacognitive thinking is a key element in the transfer of learning. The child's development of metacognitive skills is defined as meta-learning. Meta-teaching strategies can help mediate the metacognitive skills of children, help to stimilate children's metacognitive thinking. The article draws upon reserch currently being undertaken in London schools on raising achievement in thinking and learning through developing the metacognition of children as learners in schools.


Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Brown claims that two versions of metacognition are often confused, namely 'the essential distinction between self regulation during learning' and 'knowledge of, or even mental experimentation with, one's own thoughts' (Brown et al 1983). Adey & Shayer (1994) agree with this distinction, which they categorise as going beyond, and going above, the present learning behaviour. Going beyond one's present repertoire of reasoning is linked to 2,3 and 4 in Brown's list above. This can be equated with what Newman et al (1989) call 'construction zone activity', a concept derived from Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development, which refers to mental activity, usually of a collaborative nature, which involves children going beyond their present levels of competence. 

 
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The Eight Archetypes of Leadership

The Eight Archetypes of Leadership | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Which kind of leader are you?
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A list of archetypes. Thought-provoking. 

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Ship deck logs- U.S. Navy; merchant ships; MSC

information about deck logs kept on U.S. Navy ships
Sharrock's insight:

I was wondering about Star Trek's "Captain's Logs" and how they were used in the past. (see below) But I as on the train of thought because Star Trek has been on my mind lately, and was wondering how some of the show's conventions would/could be used in education. One idea was the assessment simulation. With today's voice recognition technologies, transcripts of reflections might be used each day by teachers and administrators (educators of all kinds). These might then be used to support "action research". As schools evolve into knowledge management and learning management centers (knowledge and learning management centers: KLMs), maybe correlations might be found and matched against "hard" data what is recorded already (like attendance, disciplinary, etc). 

 

from the website: 

Deck logs are not "Captain's Logs"

A deck log is not a daily diary written by the ship's captain. The "captain's log" was a dramatic device used by the creators of the televison series Star Trek to introduce each episode, and does not exist in the U.S. Navy.

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